the massimo osti experience

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the massimo osti experience

Postby maj » Fri Feb 06, 2015 10:26 am

this is a thread for massimo ostis brands and how they've either been destroyed *cough* cp company *cough* through various takeovers, grown to great heights like stone island or re-branded like MA Strum.

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stone island

A culture of research, experimentation, function and use are the matrixes that have always defined Stone Island: the sportswear brand established in 1982, designed to become a symbol of extreme research on fibres and textiles, applied to an innovative design. Season after season, it is through the study of form and the “manipulation” of the matter that Stone Island has found its own language with the aim of establishing new boundaries in the world of garment making.
The study of uniforms and of work wear, its evolution according to new requirements of use, has become Stone Island’s observation post for defining a project in which the clothing item’s function is never just aesthetic.
An ongoing investigation, thorough and without frontiers, on the processing and ennobling of fibres and textiles, leading to discover materials and production techniques never used before in the clothing industry.
Jackets constructed in nylon monofilament, deriving from the water filtering technology. Highly reflective or thermo-sensitive fabrics, changing colour with the variation of temperature. Featherweight polyester cloth vacuum- coated with a 100% stainless steel film used in aviation technology to protect the on-board computers. Non-woven materials, Kevlar® and polyester felt, rhomboidal nets in polyester used in the construction industry and coated in polyurethane. These are some examples of materials conceived by Stone Island philosophy.
Stone Island’s strength is also based on the unique ability to intervene on the finished item, through the continuous tests on dyeing and treatments carried out in the Sportswear Company’s laboratory of colour. A department able to combine advanced technology, experience and human capacity and that has developed more than 60,000 different recipes of dyes throughout the years.
All the accumulated knowledge and experience, an inalienable heritage, on which great part of Stone Island’s know-how is based, is kept in the historical archive that collects the trial tests, and the recipes for textile dyeing and handling that have been developed by all those people who have worked on this project with pas



COMPANY HISTORY


Sportswear Company, a historical company in the scenario of Italian casual wear manufacturers, started off in 1974 under the name "Chester Perry". At the end of the Seventies it became C.P. Company and growth followed accompanied by clear-cut success: that of Boneville and Stone Island joined the historic label.

Towards the mid-Eighties the company was taken over by Rabaldo Togna and by GFT and, with the arrival of Carlo Rivetti as Managing Director in 1989, the sportswear activity of GFT got underway with the name of Sportswear Company.

In 1993, following the selling off policy adopted by GFT, Sportswear Company was taken over entirely by Rivetex, the financial company held by Cristina Rivetti and her brother Carlo, with Carlo Rivetti as president.

The most recent take over was by FGF in 2010 and the first season as owners of this historical brand is Spring Summer 2011.

C.P. Company began manufacturing Italian casual wear in 1975 with the idea of bringing traditional clothing elements back into a man's wardrobe. Since then they have gone onto produce over 40,000 garments, each piece reflecting C.P. Company's philosophy – Function and Use.

The design and creation of C.P. Company clothing originates from their interest and research into military uniforms and work suits and more recently emphasis has fallen on the evolution of urban city wear. The main attraction of this type of clothing is the way in which function and wearability is combined with elegance and comfort.

C.P. Company design also focuses on the use of technical properties, either added to the fabric or the finished garment. For example, the use of large pockets, smog masks and heavy durable materials are all created carefully to suit specific situations.

One of C.P. Company's main aims has been to produce garments, which are exclusively individual, using new fabrics and finishes. This is achieved from continual experimentation with different weaves, fabrics and colours. The company uses advanced creative technology – new found raw materials are dyed, printed on, coated, washed and treated, all in ways to find the ultimate C.P. Company product.

C.P. Company unites technology and knows how with human resources with the aim of maintaining coats and outerwear, knitwear, shirts and trousers all with one unique look. In this day and age where clothing is seen as a form of personal identity, C.P. Company believes that their philosophy has become more actual – Function and Use has become a symbol of individuality, style and as always functionality.


ma strum

BONEVILLE WAS LAUNCHED IN 1981 BY LEGENDARY DESIGNER MASSIMO OSTI.

To elaborate the results of his extensive research, Osti decided to create a second menswear line, Boneville, following the launch of his first brand C.P. Company (Chester Perry), one that would precede the launch of Stone Island a year later.

The brand was created to find a use for the tremendous volume of ideas and experiments that seasonally exploded from Osti’s volcanic mind. From its ‘81 launch to its final days in 1993, Boneville set a benchmark in the men’s fashion arena, pushing boundaries both aesthetically and technically, adding to the rich tapestry that is the career of Massimo Osti....
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Last edited by maj on Fri Feb 06, 2015 10:50 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: the massimo osti experience

Postby maj » Fri Feb 06, 2015 10:40 am

si history lesson


1982

Stone Island, the Italian brand that reinvented the concept of casual wear, was founded in 1982 out of the passion and brilliant research into textile finishing performed by its creator and art director, intellectual from Bologna, Massimo Osti. It was Osti, in the mid-Seventies, who researched thousands of uniforms and pieces of work clothing and catalogued their functional characteristics. In Ravarino, in the province of Modena, he created a company whose hub was a full-scale centre of research into materials and treatments became a sophisticated laboratory for garment and experimental dyeing.
The story of Stone Island began, almost by chance, with research into a special material, a thick truck tarpaulin, the outstanding feature of which was that it had been resin-treated in red on one side and blue on the other. The first prototype was too stiff, so it was washed for a long period in water with pumice stones to break down the structure of the material. The result was surprising, a worn-look garment with great appeal. It was therefore decided to create seven jackets in that unique fabric, called Tela Stella, and to give this product a name. The strong identity of the project called for an important name, which was identified by analysing the most commonly occurring words in Joseph Conrad’s novels: the words Stone and Island were chosen.
Stone Island has a marine feel, conjuring up old oilskins corroded by the sea and a military feel, which is drawn from the fund of research completed until that time. The name also evokes a love of the sea and that first treatment selected to “process” the garments. The badge, the detachable fabric label that has distinguished Stone Island garments since the first season, showed a Compass Rose, displayed like a military badge.

The reaction is immediate. Stone Island became a success phenomenon, with no set plan or marketing research behind it.
A typically Italian mix of creativity, intuition and entrepreneurial spirit.

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1983

in 1983, Massimo wanted to dedicate himself to the creative side of the company and, together with his partners, decided that to give the company structure and resources, it would be a good idea to join forces with a large firm. GFT, Gruppo Finanziario Tessile in Turin bought Osti out.
Carlo Rivetti, a shareholder in the group, entered the scene. He believed in casual wear and fell in love with the product, research, concept and creative tension in the air in Ravarino, so much so that ten years later, in 1993, together with his sister Cristina, he bought out the entire firm, renaming it Sportswear Company S.p.A.. And it is precisely owing to the continuity of Carlo Rivetti that the brand has never lost its basic make-up and its integrity, continuing to pursue religiously the research and experimentation that has always set it apart with enthusiasm and dedication.

Tela Stella drew to an end and the research was extended to other materials like Jock 23, a cotton canvas with a thick matte PVC coating and latex detailing.

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1984 – 1986

In the meantime, the collection was evolving, expanding to include further elements: jumpers, trousers, t-shirts and shirts; each one very special.
Further lines of research were embarked upon, into fabrics, treatments and coatings.
It was in ’84 that Raso Gommato was introduced, a cotton satin of military origin, with an inner or outer polyurethane coating. This fabric took its place alongside Tela Stella as a symbolic Stone Island fabric.

Those were the years of the boom. More than a fashion, Stone Island became a mania. Young people in Italy felt that Stone Island provided them with assertive garments that helped them to express their personalities and the GFT structure supported foreign expansion.

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1987 – 1988

Together with the evolution of Raso Gommato, Stone Island explores the heat-sealed PVC and creates the Glazed Silk Light: shiny trilobate nylon coated in PVC, with thick, glazed effect.

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1989 – 1991

The Ice Jacket was born. Created in heat-sensitive fabric, it amazed onlookers by drastically changing colour with changes in temperature. It morphed from yellow to dark green, white to bright blue and pink to grey. It was a totally innovative way of interpreting clothing, which interacted with the behaviour of the wearer.
The Ice Jacket then evolved in terms of colours and fabrics, to create mimetic garments, which lost their printed patterns in the cold.

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1992

A highly reflective Japanese fabric, coated with thousands of micro glass spheres inspired the Reflective Jacket. It was metallic white or bright red, green, yellow or blue. It reflected light from even the weakest light sources.
The jackets used the language of colour signs and safety work garments. They were assertive and tremendously striking garments.

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1993 – 1996

In 1993, Carlo Rivetti and his sister Cristina left GFT to devote themselves entirely to the firm in Ravarino, which they renamed Sportswear Company. There was a need for a Milanese branch and in 1994 the first showroom was opened, covering 500 square metres in Via Bramante.

Amongst the new fabrics introduced between ’93 and ’96, was Formula Steel, a nylon canvas bonded to a polyurethane film; Radiale, a fabric with a thick rubber laminate coating with raw cut edges and Oltre, a fine layer of nylon with an ultra shiny coating.

1996 was an important year. The association with Massimo Osti came to an end as he had opened Massimo Osti Production some seasons earlier with several partners.
Carlo Rivetti entrusted Stone Island to Paul Harvey, an Englishman of genius, who took up the challenge to succeed Osti in order to lead Stone Island towards the next millennium. This gamble turned out to be a real winner. Paul developed the range and reworked the materials, then he went a step further: driving research, he investigated materials that were entirely outside of the clothing field and studied extremely innovative construction and technical solutions.
Paul evolves the Radiale with an effect called ‘esploso’ and works on techniques of WQR -Water Resistant Quilting-.

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1997 – 1998

Reverse Colour Process on Raso Gommato – which was first printed black, then faded using a corrosion technique on the majority of the surface and then over-dyed and Nylana – a heavy nylon canvas used to line tanks -, became a part of the Stone Island collections.
Stone Island starts the research on nylon monofilament, industrial materials used for water filters and gauzes laminated.

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1999 – 2001

The end of the century and a new millennium: Stone Island invents new techniques, as the NOC 1, a rubber hood made in a mould, and the Laminate, a forerunner of the Made in Stone Island performing textiles.
The Pure Metal Shell Silver and Pure Metal Shell Bronze and were launched: parkas created with 100% stainless steel and 100% bronze metallic mesh bonded to a fabric base. The Pure Metal Shell Silver was exhibited in the huge foyer of the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris to celebrate its reopening.
Silver Spray was also introduced, a fine polyester base bonded by means of a vacuum seal to a 100% stainless steel film, born to be used to shield aeroplane on-board circuits.

In 1999, the coordinated image for the Stone Island flagship stores was fine tuned and launched. It was pure innovation: shaped poles in luminous fibreglass, in oak and carbon fibre, freely embeddable in a stainless steel floating floor. In September, the Milan store was opened at 12 Corso Venezia and in December in London, at 46 Beak Street, in the heart of Soho.

The research focus shifted to Kevlar®, which is five times stronger than the same weight in steel and highly thermo-insulating. Stone Island’s interpretation of this impossible to dye material, entailed coupling it with a nylon mesh and a polyurethane coating to allow the colour to seize upon the finished piece through garment dyeing.

The Ventile® was introduced: a military textile 100% cotton, naturally performing, developed in Great Britain for British fighter pilots’ overalls during the Second World War.
Research continued on Nylon Monofilament . The origin of this study is found in SERIE 100, an experimental project on female clothing that – from 2001 to 2004 – acted as the incubator for the countless explorations made by Stone Island in the world of monofilament textiles, in many of its declinations, as in the materials utilised for the filtering of water or the nets used in the construction industry.

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http://www.stoneisland.com/experience/e ... the-brand/
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Re: the massimo osti experience

Postby maj » Fri Feb 06, 2015 10:42 am

mille miglia history lesson

In 1988, C.P. Company sponsored the Mille Miglia, one of the most prestigious vintage car races in world.

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Massimo Osti, the innovator of Italian Sportswear had been collecting and studying protective hoods worn by the Japanese Civil Defence, and grew excited about the idea of making a jacket with lenses sewn into the fabric. The problem of preserving the fabric’s integrity around the perimeter of the lenses was resolved thanks to a frame created especially by the Italian company Baruffaldi, a world leader in the sports optics field. The first prototype, which featured lenses sewn into an extended collar, inspired Massimo and was produced in very limited quantities for S/S 1988 in Mais cotton.

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Following further research into protective hoods used by the army, Massimo created several further prototypes. Anti-gas goods, a new flintstone, gave him the idea to include lenses in the hood. The forms of this new version of the goggle jacket adopted the multi-functionality of Swiss field jackets, whose intelligent pockets could perform numerous tasks. Another lens was then added to the sleeve, allowing the wearer to view his watch, adding further functionality to this iconic jacket.



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Once C.P. Company agreed to sponsor the race in 1988, Massimo realised that the garment seemed as though it had been designed specifically for the Mille Miglia. It best corresponds with his vision of the perfect jacket to wear on any adventure, protecting the wearer from rain and mud, in addition to having a system of pockets allowing him to carry a full range of necessities, from identification papers, to a canteen, victuals, and maps. He then offered it to organisers and participants.

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The version of the Goggle jacket used for the 1988 edition of the Mille Miglia car race was constructed from a simple beige fabric and featured the race logo printed in red on the pocket flap. It is from this version that the jacket model takes its unofficial nickname “MILLE MIGLIA”. Functional, timeless, and aesthetically bold, this jacket has become a symbol of C.P. Company’s creativity, and has been produced in endless variations ever since 1988.



http://www.cpcompany.co.uk/blogs/news/1 ... se-an-icon
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Re: the massimo osti experience

Postby maj » Fri Feb 06, 2015 10:48 am

massimo overview

Early years

Massimo Osti was born and raised in Bologna, Italy. He became a graphic designer and worked in the advertising business. His career in the fashion industry began in the early 1970s, when he designed a T-shirt collection featuring placed prints. He was the first to use new techniques like the four-color process and silkscreen which are used for producing T-shirt. Following the success of this first T-shirt collection, he accepted the offer to design a complete Men's collection and became an equity partner in the company he would name 'Chester Perry' (later renamed the 'C.P. Company').

1980s


During this period, Osti laid the foundations for a creative philosophy entirely based on experimentation. The first innovation he would be responsible for in the clothing industry was garment dyeing, a process that completely revolutionized the field. It was based upon the concept of different materials in finished garments reacting differently to the same dye bath. Osti discovered that garment dyeing creates interesting tone-on-tone effects. This particular dyeing technique became typical for Osti's C.P. Company. In 1981, he launched "Boneville", a new brand alongside the existing CP Company and CP Company Baby collections.

Ongoing research on finishing techniques and materials led to yet another clothing line in 1982: Stone Island. The first collection was made entirely from a revolutionary new fabric that inspired from the tarps used by truck drivers. The 'used' look of this highly resistant, two-tone, reversible fabric was obtained through stone washing. This new collection was so successful that it sold out at every location within 10 days.

In 1984, Osti relinquished his shares of CP Company to GFT, but stayed on as president. He and his team devoted themselves to product development and communication strategies for the company. In 1985, he became the editor of CP Magazine, an extra-large format catalog/magazine that was sold at newspaper stands. It featured photographs of every garment in the CP Company collections and visualized the C.P. lifestyle perfectly. A circulation of 40,000 copies per collection proved that this unusual advertising tool was indeed effective. It started a trend that would later be followed by many other companies in the industry.

1987 was an important year in Osti's career. He invented and presented Rubber Flax and Rubber Wool – linen and wool with a thin, rubber coating. The rubber made the materials waterproof, improved their resistance and added a totally new look and feel to the garments. In the same year Osti experimented with brushed combed wool for the first time. Today all mills use this procedure for processing woolen textiles, the same process Osti invented in 1987.

The year also saw the birth of the color changing Ice Jacket. In collaboration with ITS, Osti employed state-of-the-art technological research to create this new fabric which changed color by temperature variations. That same year, his constant commitment to experimentation earned Massimo Osti an invitation to represent the Italian clothing industry at an event commemorating the 750th anniversary of Berlin’s founding, the 150th anniversary of textile manufacturing and his own 15th year in the business. For the occasion, an exhibit was held inside the Reichstag building in Berlin.

In 1988, Massimo Osti’s designs developed a new means of communication with the public through the CP Company sponsorship of the Mille Miglia race. The company also showed its support of the Rainforest Foundation, the foundation spearheaded by Sting and Raoni, chief of the Kayapo tribe in Amazonia, whose purpose was to raise worldwide awareness of deforestation in the Amazon rainforest.

1990s

1991 marked the opening of a CP store in New York’s historical Flatiron Building, plus the launch of yet another iconic garment within the Stone Island line: the Reflective Jacket. This jacket was made from an innovative material, which was the fruit of technological research conducted in Japan. The material combined waterproof fabric with a very thin layer of glass microspheres, which reflected even the weakest light sources with astonishing effectiveness.

In 1993, a partnership with Allegri gave rise to Left Hand. This new brand was characterized by another exclusive material, a non-woven fabric made from pressed polyester and nylon fibers which, like felt, could be used with raw edge stitching. The following year, Osti founded Massimo Osti Production, a company that would reap the benefits of the experience and successes accrued from 20 years’ worth of formal and technical innovations. In 1995, the ST 95 line was launched and in 1996, Osti began a collaboration with Superga, which consisted in designing a collection of image-defining garments.

Just two years later in 1998, a new company was founded to produce and distribute the OM Project brand, the collaboration with the Frattini Group. This new line of clothing would also be characterized by the use of innovative fabrics:

Electric-j – a highly resistant material made of polyester and copper fibers
Cool Cotton – whose natural look is derived from its cotton component while its other component
Cool max – a hollow fiber that absorbs bodily moisture and wicks it outwards
Mag Defender – a canvas made of polyester and carbon fibers whose highly resistant weave shields its wearer from magnetic fields
Steel – an "urban armor" featuring a nylon canvas which is woven with twisted cotton and stainless steel, making it highly resistant to cuts and tears.
In 1999, Massimo Osti began the collaboration with Dockers Europe to design a new line of technical pants called Equipment for Legs. Of the technical materials used in this collection, a special blend of Kevlar stood out in particular; its increased softness and functionality made it appropriate to its application in garment production.

2000–present

Among Osti's last projects was the ICD line. Created in 2000 thanks to a collaboration with Levi’s, it offered a vast array of high performance technical outerwear. This collection was then supplemented by the ICD+ line which, thanks to an agreement with Philips, featured outwear garments which came equipped with a cell phone, mp3 player, and accompanying headphones and microphone which were all wired to the garment itself. It was the world's first commercial example of wearable technology.

Massimo Osti died in 2005 and his legacy lives on today through the Massimo Osti Archive, a textile archive which includes 5,000 garments and over 50,000 fabric samples from approximately 300 textile mills and garment finishing companies from around the world.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massimo_Osti
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Re: the massimo osti experience

Postby maj » Fri Feb 06, 2015 10:55 am

can anyone translate?

[vimeo]http://www.vimeo.com/15348735[/vimeo]

sheds some light on how it used to be
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Re: the massimo osti experience

Postby ynnrz » Thu Feb 12, 2015 1:23 pm

Some stuff on a lesser known Osti label, Left Hand.
In the early 1990’s Massimo Osti left Sportswear Company, the mother enterprise of Stone Island, Boneville and C.P Company. He then started his own brands, like Left Hand, Massimo Osti Production and ST.95. Once again he launched textile innovation and some of them had military connotations like the Thermojoint for instance which was nuclear radiation resistant.

In the year of 1993 one of the best quality and understated label of them all was realised by Massimo Osti in partnership with Allergi. The label was called Left Hand and the first pieces were sold in late 94. The Left Hand label was relativity short lived and the last collection was seen in 1999. Using his many years experience of technical innovations with Stone Island and CP Company this new breed of garment was again years ahead of its time with cutting edge design and materials. This new brand was characterized by another exclusive material, a non-woven fabric made from pressed polyester and nylon fibers which, like felt, could be used with raw edge stitching. It was to become known as Thermojoint. The range consisted mainly of outer wear at first and they came with a hefty price tag with some well over £500.

The Left hand Thermojoint sale tag read: “FULLY WATER AND MIST-PROOF MATERIAL”

For the manufacture of durable protective garments, ideal for Fisherman and Fire-fighters apparel and for outdoor living outfits in general. 80% Protection against Nuclear Radiation.

LONG LIFE LOW MAINTENANCE RECYCLABLE


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Above: Thermojoint inside label. All Thermojoint jackets have this inside.

The top end of Left Hand was the Thermojoint, the jackets claimed to give protection against nuclear radiation although no one has ever tested this claim to my knowledge. Its main characteristics are total resistance to water and wear, and has the appearance of a vinyl type material, they also had double taped seams to keep the weather out. As Osti had moved away from the sportswear company the Thermojoint was produced by an Italian company called its-artea. The jackets would often look plain but on closer inspection would be filled with small details like mobile phone pockets, Velcro adjusters, and fold away hoods. The branding was always more discreet with the heat embossed logo on the left arm and on the zip pulls. The label also produced in later collections many casual shirts, cargo pants, chinos, cardigans, jumpers, polo & tee shirts and even a small women’s range. Some of the designs we see today are direct descendants from Lefthand like the popular CP Company multi pocket Mille Miglia jackets, minus the goggles which have just been realised again for the S/S 11 collection.

The label had varying degrees of success around the UK being most popular in the North West of England and London but would be regularly seen on the sales racks at discounted prices at the end of each season. After the labels demise in 1999 the Thermojoint jackets instantly became a collector’s item and are still very much sought after today. They rarely surface on auction sites/forums and when they do they are normally in very large sizes. They can sell from a £100 to well over £250 depending on size, colour and of course condition.


Source: http://www.osti-archive.com/blog/2011/07/01/left-hand-by-massimo-osti/

That site has a bunch of good reads on other Osti stuff too, worth having a browse through it.
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