womenswear

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womenswear

Postby can- » Wed Jul 17, 2013 5:33 pm

this is my roommate who just graduated and and her final collection @ parsons MFA

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all prints are her own and give the gear this surreal look-- all of those pieces are actually laying flat but look very 3d/voluminous
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Re: womenswear

Postby Syeknom » Wed Jul 17, 2013 5:36 pm

They look really cool, would like to see them on a person
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Re: womenswear

Postby can- » Thu Jul 18, 2013 3:03 pm

this is my sister in 2003 teen vogue

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im pretty sure memories of this keep her awake at night with shame
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Re: womenswear

Postby sknss » Thu Jul 18, 2013 4:03 pm

i'd like to see those balenciaga cargos
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Re: womenswear

Postby Syeknom » Thu Jul 18, 2013 5:15 pm

Haha, that's great

Does your sister "do" fashion, ben?
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Re: womenswear

Postby bels » Fri Jul 19, 2013 2:13 am

I think if I recall correctly ben's sister exists in a post fashion nirvana where she looks good by accident and doesn't care AKA the dream.
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Re: womenswear

Postby Syeknom » Sun Jul 21, 2013 12:29 pm

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Annemie Turtelboom, Belgian Minister of Justice, wearing an Ann Demeulermeester jacket and Margiela silver ring for today's abdication speech of Koning Albert II
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Re: womenswear

Postby can- » Sun Jul 21, 2013 12:31 pm

Mad jawnzz
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Re: womenswear

Postby bels » Sun Jul 21, 2013 12:49 pm

Is Belgium big on fashion syek?
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Re: womenswear

Postby Syeknom » Sun Jul 21, 2013 2:20 pm

Depends where but not really

Antwerp and Hasselt sure

Gent has a lot of "hip" young folk but most dress like badly

Leuven everyone dresses bad middle-class

Brussels is either atrocious or atrocious-posh

Saw a women once in Brussels station wearing the H&M/Margiela duvet coat
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Re: womenswear

Postby bels » Sun Jul 21, 2013 5:16 pm

Don't think there's a poltician in the UK who would wear Andy
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Re: womenswear

Postby Syeknom » Sun Jul 21, 2013 5:46 pm

About 10 years ago the city of Antwerp asked Walter Van Bierendonck to design the uniforms for the city's municipal workers

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Not sure if they were ever used though
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Re: womenswear

Postby bels » Sun Jul 21, 2013 5:53 pm

thats fucking awesome.
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Re: womenswear

Postby can- » Sun Jul 21, 2013 10:09 pm

first fit beyond dope
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Re: womenswear

Postby germinal » Mon Jul 22, 2013 7:02 am

bela wrote:Don't think there's a poltician in the UK who would wear Andy


But there's bound to be a politician who wears, i dunno, Christopher Kane (bad example i know) or some other British designer

like Michelle Obama wears thom browne... i think for female politicians there's a certain amount of status to be gained from being seen to wear a designer from your country. perhaps even for male politicians too. although i remember reading a thing in the Telegraph (lol) where they criticised one of the Millibands for wearing a floral print Paul Smith shirt
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Re: womenswear

Postby Syeknom » Mon Jul 22, 2013 7:12 am

Yeah, that's it really. The royals here and politicians have their outfits for events designed by approved designers - Natan did most of the outfits for this ceremony for example. I've no doubt MervrouwTurtelboom enjoys fashion (my girlfriend describes her as always being dressed like this) but there's certainly a degree of wearing Begian designers for the symbolic elements.

That said I really like how she brought a designer as full-on as Ann into a pretty serious and formal/business-like event.

The royals in the UK obviously have the same thing with the royal approval given to a variety of mostly good British brands who supply the family - Barbour, Trickers, Drakes, etc. Also shit like Austin Reed and Daks though.

Italian businessmen take pride in getting their shit made by the Italian bespoke houses.
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Re: womenswear

Postby adhi » Wed Jul 24, 2013 4:54 pm

syek is your gf also an englishperson living in belgium? or are you with a local belgian? jw.
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Re: womenswear

Postby Syeknom » Wed Jul 24, 2013 5:19 pm

I've gone native, she's a local.
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Re: womenswear

Postby bels » Fri Jul 26, 2013 7:45 am

http://www.fashionsnap.com/collection/u ... 2013-14aw/

I thought the sue undercover stuff looked cool.
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Re: womenswear

Postby schiaparelli » Mon Jul 29, 2013 6:32 pm

kine økland. from her artist statement of sorts (google-translated):

Kine Økland is concerned with colors and shades, chance against repetitions, contradictory material that overlaps and small details with big impact. She wants her work to reflect good craftsmanship, unexpected combinations and a commitment to the final result. Her expression is going through draping and construction and she likes best when she's working on fabrics before they become garments. There is also a continuing desire to combine minimum with a maximum in a balanced form where details u ten feature will avoid owned if possible. She will always be focused on her work to provide durability in terms of both physical qualities as well as sentimental value among carriers.


below is an image from her graduating collection (she has a B.A. in dress & costume design), entitled "the catch". i think it's quite beautiful to see how rigidly it's structured, but also how soft the folds are…tightly crunched-together pleats that fall from front to back like a slowly elongating crescendo of fabric. i'm sorry that sentence was so pretentious. i'm truly sorry.

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i feel the need to also note that the photography is excellent (by christian lycke), as is the model's pose. makes it seem quite regal, kind of reminds me of those super overdone pre-revolutionary france gowns. of course this is a bright yellow and not a french grand dâme damask and it's much shorter. it feels kind of refreshing, like a youthful kind of stateliness. you can find more images through the designer's website of the graduate collection. here's a photograph of the same dress in white that gives a little more information re: the construction—

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i'm pretty obsessed with pleats && rigidly structured garments && geometric motifs in fashion so this piece (also by øklund) pretty much hits the sweet spot for me (and also, i think, it's another hint of the stupidly rigid…what's it called…where aristocratic women back in the day would have this massive wire boning/whatnot to support a gigantic skirt for a gown? what is that)—

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Re: womenswear

Postby Rosenrot » Mon Jul 29, 2013 8:59 pm

Hmm.. Visually pleasing as it may be, her construction ability lags behind her concept. Granted it's a BA-level work so good attempt.
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Re: womenswear

Postby schiaparelli » Tue Jul 30, 2013 3:36 am

what specifically stands out to you as poor construction or unsatisfying construction? i'm curious because it's still hard for me to pick up on these things and articulate my findings.
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Re: womenswear

Postby germinal » Tue Jul 30, 2013 4:40 am

I think what Rosenrot is getting at is that the garments aren't as well-finished as they could be, e.g. the puckering around the bust on the yellow dress, or most obviously, in the third picture, the lines of the boxes could be straighter, the corners better defined, the surfaces flatter etc.
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Re: womenswear

Postby germinal » Wed Jul 31, 2013 7:29 am

whilst we're on the topic of poorly-finished clothing, here's a review of Christian Dior Haute Couture F/W 2013:

Garmento wrote:Haute Couture represents the highest echelon of clothes making in the Western tradition. As it has once been explained, haute means “high” or “superior” and couture means “clothes” or sometimes regarded as “sewing,” and so the term simply refers to the best of the craft. As an enterprise it was formalized in Paris in 1868 by Charles Fredrick Worth and until the mid-1960’s it not only represented the highest levels of technical ability but also conceptual. Until the 1960s haute couture dictated the trends and shifts in Western women’s fashion, it was solely responsible for determining how women dressed until youth culture and a prevalent and widely observed street culture usurped its eminence and influence and fashion leadership shifted towards the domain of ready-to-wear.

Today couture faces an ongoing struggle to maintain its vitality. As a business it has dwindled due to increased labor and material costs making turning a profit an aloof goal. Modern lifestyles have outmoded what was essentially a glorified client/dressmaker relationship of the days of yore and the customer base of not only those who can afford it but care to buy it has shrunk exponentially over the last few decades. It exists in our hearts and minds as a memetic abstract derived from our outdated memories of what it once was. From the golden age of Dior and Balenciaga to its last significant revival in the ‘80s, the decade of excess when Lacroix and Ungaro reigned supreme, it has become synonymous with larger than life gowns, wedding dresses for heiresses, and red carpet looks for Hollywood’s elite. In our enthusiasm for its hyperbolic glamour we have lost sight that Cristobal Balenciaga did his business with navy day suits or that Coco Chanel revolutionized the trade with modest jersey dresses.

There are only a handful of couture houses that function at a capacity anywhere close to where the industry was just less than a century ago when a single house among dozens would employ a workroom of hundreds. Perhaps the most prestigious and high functioning couture house, after Chanel, is Christian Dior who’s creative director Raf Simons just showed his third haute couture collection for the house on Monday.

The collection is said to have been inspired by various global perspectives from four continents and the idea of interpreting Dior through their different lenses. His was a more abstract and possibly intellectualized take on an exercise that his predecessor had practically invented. In fact John Galliano’s debut for the house in 1997 was a spirited and wondrous homage to the Masai, the African tribe known for their vibrant and detailed personal ornamentation and textiles that Simons also made reference to in this recent globetrotting adventure. All around the world Simons applied an idea of Dior that he has cultivated over the last several seasons; mixing it and juxtaposing it with various ethnic costumes, as if to find some kind of synergy between them all – a poetic if not artful statement about a famously French house flanked by a shrinking global culture. The result was, as far as one could observe online, a pastiche of color, fabric, texture, form and symbols. The ethnic references were far less on the nose than anything Galliano did which, though seemingly more ideal for the current mood and climate, muddled his intentions given the vast amounts of information in the collection. The sequence of looks, each with little connection to the other beyond a great taste for turbid color schemes and embellishment, could leave one confounded. And at the collection’s most ethnic moments, perhaps in a deconstructed peekaboo dress or in a kimono sleeved coat, it seemed to rely more on recent innovations in contemporary fashion rather than an earnest investigation of how the dress and costume in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas could actually inform. And this is in spite of a precedence for this manner of research that has long been established by designers like Issey Miyake and Bonnie Cashin who appropriated ideas like layering, wrapping and the kimono cut and championed them for their innate universal appeal rather than the mere suggestion of worldliness they might offer after pasted onto a couture carapace.

Simons has received praise with this collection for modernizing couture; this has also been said of his last two collections. But what does modern couture mean? Is this referring to modernizing the craft aesthetically or contextually? Certainly Simons has brought a sea change to how couture garments are viewed and what is expected of them visually. The idea that a proper couture dress must be an oversized ball gown has gone out the window, and thankfully so. Simons has embraced minimalism, wardrobe essentials, and clothes that are far more real in their circumstance than a dress that requires two assistants to hoist onto a runway. It speaks back to when couture was a vital industry that actually dressed people for life and not for photo ops and red carpet credits (though Jennifer Lawrence’s unfortunate fall on her way to accept her Oscar award seems to invalidate this appeal). And then again, Lagerfeld at Chanel has always been sure to avoid the traps of pageantry in favor of offering his clients a full and functional wardrobe, which they always seem to buy. And there is of course Adeline Andre who has injected minimalism into couture years before the idea would come to fruition in the ‘90s. Dior’s new modern couture is a refreshing revelation for the house but it is only a personal one.

But then you wonder if Simons is modernizing couture via craft and technique. In an industry based on workmanship this would be an exciting prospect yet it is when considering craft that this collection faces its greatest challenges. Not long after hi-resolution photos of the show hit the internet did a blogger who goes by Mari J do a frank and up close study of the collection. The zoom-in shots of seams, details, and hems are revealing. Highlighted are what appears to be copious amounts of seam pucker, fabric buckling around the body, and on the inside lining of the dress that closed the show, a dressmaker’s chalk line left there for the world to see. This is startling when you consider that couture is prized on the fact that the inside is as beautiful as the outside. Seam pucker is a typical issue in construction and is usually due to the tension of the stitch being greater than the fabric causing the seam, once sewn, to scrunch up. It’s a sure sign of rushed sewing. Many of the finishings Mari J highlights, which we can assume are all done by hand, are inadequate in controlling the fabric and shaping it to the specifications of the design. The fabric is resisting the way it’s been cut and sewn and so it buckles around the body causing the contortions and in many parts, especially in the sleeves, a bad fit. In Mari J’s highlights this can be observed in everything from the hems to the darts to the shoulders seams. In garments that Mari J does not focus on there are just as many issues and what is observed is an overall lack of knowledge of fabrics and garment construction, the two most important skillsets of the couturier. These issues force the question of how valid any of Simons ideas are when they are not being executed with the standards that define the genre he is working in. If haute couture truly is “superior sewing” then what is this collection? And can one truly modernize couture if they are not earnestly designing it?
http://garmentozine.com/2013/07/03/chri ... et-review/
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Re: womenswear

Postby sknss » Wed Jul 31, 2013 8:48 am

that blog is absolutely hysterical.

so what went wrong in this collection?
raf has already proved his tailoring talent and the seamstresses seem to be quite experienced as well
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Re: womenswear

Postby germinal » Wed Jul 31, 2013 8:57 am

OMG! Raf Simons is a real shame for DIOR! Somebody,throw him out !!!

but yeah i dunno, a rush job perhaps?
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Re: womenswear

Postby bels » Wed Jul 31, 2013 10:56 am

Sick of this huckster charlatan "Raf Simons" bring Galliano back he seemed like such a nice, reliable young man.
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Re: womenswear

Postby starfox64 » Wed Jul 31, 2013 11:24 am

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Re: womenswear

Postby germinal » Wed Jul 31, 2013 12:02 pm

been meaning to make a BLESS thread
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Re: womenswear

Postby germinal » Sun Aug 04, 2013 7:00 am

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Fashion Show Nº30, Women’s Collection Spring–Summer 2000

"This was my favourite show. On the sound system you could hear all this dialogue from crazy Spanish films, banditos riding away, then this couple having a passionate argument, then you’d hear them making up, then the squeak of the bed. It was so funny. He’s got a such a fabulous sense of humour, he doesn’t take himself seriously at all. It was held in this theatre in the Trocadéro that was absolutely falling apart, but they transformed it with bright colours, and the catwalk was running across the room, with models coming around the corner in profile. The collection was full of the biggest skirts. So you had this juxtaposition of the soundtrack, and the fashion, and all these people who were completely confused because they couldn’t understand which were the best seats, and they were all taking themselves so seriously. They just didn’t get it. But what a clever idea."
- Debi Greenberg, Louis Boston


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Perhaps the biggest challenge in staging his show is finding the exact shades of paint demanded by the designer. The catwalk runs horizontally along a concrete wall in the former Musée du Cinema in the cellar of the Trocadéro, and the wall must be painted fuchsia and orange, in the style of the Mexican architect and garden designer Luis Barragán, to create a backdrop for a brightly coloured, Mexican-themed collection. However, the site is under renovation and the wall requires several coats before the colours are deemed acceptable.


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Press and buyers arrive to find this powerful graphic statement, and receive a small pumpkin, full of pumpkin soup. The pants and shorter skirts have been edited out of the presentation, in an attempt to break with the minimalist tendency of the time. Instead the show features a single silhouette: a long, full voluminous skirt, worn with blouses and jackets. Some of the biggest skirts have eight metres of fabric, and must be worn with underskirts to hold them out. There is scepticism among sections of the press about this new romantic feeling, which seems out of step with current trends. However, the show proves to be directional, and within a few seasons bright colour, larger volumes and longer skirt lengths are commonplace.


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The soundtrack is considerably less romantic than the collection: a compilation of snippets of dialogue from Pedro Almodovar’s films, featuring lots of screaming and shouting, drama and passion. The show is dedicated to Christine Mathys, co-founder of the Dries Van Noten fashion label, who had passed away shortly beforehand.


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"Seriously, I rarely go to fashion shows. They treat you so badly. But a few designers, I go to the shows because they treat you well, they entertain you, they give you a reason to be there. And Dries is definitely among them. And you know what? Everybody else puts their name up on a wall at the back the catwalk. Or they say ‘Oh, my show was so expensive,’ and I think, ‘Yeah, because you spent all your money on a big name PR company and champagne and a party in a swanky restaurant, rather than doing something creative that might have cost half as much.’

At Dries they always serve food, and that’s such a gracious thing. You’re rushing to get there and somebody hands you some warm food or a cool drink, and that’s where the personality really shows through. There is no one in the industry even remotely like him, he really has love for everything he does."

- Debi Greenberg, Louis Boston


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"I wanted to create a collection about passion and love, something to prove that intensity is not necessarily about women with tight clothes and high heels."
- Dries Van Noten


Dries Van Noten, 01–50 Golden Anniversary
http://cotonblanc.tumblr.com/
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