Twombly garms

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Twombly garms

Postby maj » Fri Mar 13, 2015 6:58 am

Thread for general uk centric YOOF CULCHYA, none of that mod and punk shit this is straight 2010+ Mandems.
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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby maj » Fri Mar 13, 2015 7:00 am

http://shop.palaceskateboards.com/password

Palace drop last night was some next level shit, featuring some sick tech jackets and bare cutNsew. Hojestly the best shit these guys have bashed out for bare.

Picked up a vent jacket and parrot long sleeve.

Although I have now received a call from consortium with them noticing my Jedi price tricks and apologising for marking the jacket wrong, I now have to wait for a refund and rebuy once paypal sorts itself out. He was a lovely chap though would order from again.
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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby can- » Fri Mar 13, 2015 10:31 am

why doesn't chrome offer to translate thispage?
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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby can- » Fri Mar 13, 2015 10:45 am

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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby stappard_ » Fri Mar 13, 2015 11:38 am

huge banter merchant
opens a banter boutique
atelier du bants
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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby haz » Fri Mar 13, 2015 2:01 pm

this thread hits a bit too close to home
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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby Chimpskibot » Fri Mar 13, 2015 10:03 pm

Image Is this gravy enough?
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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby pirxthepilot » Mon Mar 16, 2015 8:41 am

bela told me the robert geller zip blazer was 'pong', i was too embarrassed to say i didn't know what that meant. pls clarify yoof mandem
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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby maj » Mon Mar 16, 2015 8:55 am

Pong is cts filter for p e n g which implies your blazer is attractive and desirable in the eyes of bela
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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby Thomnd » Mon Mar 16, 2015 9:26 am

My 50 year old Oor Wullie books taught me pong meant smelly
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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby maj » Mon Mar 16, 2015 9:51 am

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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby pirxthepilot » Mon Mar 16, 2015 9:55 am

wait, now you've confused me and im not even foreign. i thought at least UW and albam were kind of tasteful dad heritage-lite?
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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby maj » Mon Mar 16, 2015 9:59 am

we don't discriminate between taste here, wear what you want to wear even if it's bright and vintiage, dull and vintage, skatewear, and so on. th thread is for uk street fashion and culture post 2010. a slight side step away from baller designer wear and more into "every day brands" that the "every day person" would find out about if they had moderate interest in clothing and visited carnabey street, canden, shoreditch, manchester, birmingham, liverpool ect bi anually.

wavey garms

Ebay might be responsible for some of our most dubious purchases since launching 15 years ago, but we should also credit it with changing the way young people shop.

Take Wavey Garms. One of the many e-commerce sites spawned from eBay (which is celebrating its birthday this week), the Facebook selling group was set up 18 months ago on a small scale and has since become the go-to site for discerning youth after new and vintage streetwear. It’s now at the point of dictating what young people wear, ahead of even trend forecasters.

Set up by Andres Branco, 25, a former chef, and later joined by his girlfriend, Gabrielle Roberts, 24, a fashion graduate, it was created in part as a reaction to Branco’s experiences of eBay: “He was fed up with all the fees and having to trawl through tat to get what he wanted” explains Roberts. Their main goal was to create a “cool” environment for like-minded people to buy and sell niche clothing.

18 months on, Wavey Garms has over 70,000 users between 16 and 30-ish, three groups (Wavey Garms, Wavey Garms Ladies and Wavey Kicks) and 7,050 people on the waiting list. As Vice put it more succicntly, Wavey Garms is “Reddit for people selling old Hilfiger windbreakers instead of atheism”.

Streetwear seems to be the overriding theme on Wavey Garms, and the pair have accidentally or not hit upon a largely untapped market: “We knew streetwear was big, but we never thought it was grow at the rate it has,” says Roberts.

Streetwear is undergoing a terrific resurgence in popularity thanks, it is thought, to the merging of minor labels with major-league wearers. Hood By Air is a case in point. Since launching in 2006, it has become a cult brand thanks to its celebrity fans including Kanye West, A$AP Rocky and Daniel Sturridge. Equally, Business of Fashion credits the influence of designers such as Raf Simons and labels like Supreme for propelling streetwear into the luxury market while simultaneously bolstering the status of affordable pieces by Nike and Puma. The trickle-down effect has been tremendous for Wavey Garms, which has cornered the vintage end of things: “It’s mainly the 1980s and 1990s, which people want, and things will sell out in minutes.”

Wavey Garms works like this: users request to join the Facebook group and then post pictures of things they want to sell. These are the wavey (cool) garms (garments). Other members can then direct message them and negotiate a price which is then paid, usually via PayPal, and delivered either by hand or posted. Most things go for less than £100 unless they are really sought after. The owners can’t check every item so it operates on trust and as yet, it hasn’t had any official complaints although it will ban people who seem to be using it for the wrong reason.

As yet the pair are making very little – “a bit via advertising, pop-up markets, things like that” – but the idea is turn it into a profit-making e-commerce site.

More importantly, though, Wavey Garms has become a yardstick for what people are actually wearing and coveting: “Andreas is from south London so he knows what’s current. It’s very instinctual for him. He just looks at what his friends are wearing, what people look like at parties, it’s streetwear in the real sense.”

So what are people wearing? “The most coveted items seem to be printed Versace shirts, anything with the Moschino logo on it, Supreme, which is still huge despite being quite mainstream, 1990s Fendi items and these sweaters by Champion, the tennis brand. There was a pair of Moschino printed shorts on there the other day. It was sold in less than five minutes.”

Whereas the Asos Marketplace – a subsite of online retailer Asos and not dissimilar to Wavey Garms – is fairly indiscriminate, Wavey Garms is very selective about the quality of merchandise, although much of the vetting is down to the group remembers themselves who aren’t shy of “tearing something apart” if it feels a little bit late. If trends move fast in real life, they move 10 times faster on social media: “Six months ago we had loads of postings for Nike Huarache trainers. Everyone wanted them. Since then there’s been a serious influx – if you try and sell a pair people will post: ‘Bit late mate’.”

Having tapped into the pace of changing trends, and in particular streetwear, Wavey Garms piqued the interest of a trend forecasters who keep “secret” tabs on their Instagram page. In essence, trend forecasters are looking to them to tell them what’s cool. “WSGN [one of the biggest trend forecasters] told us we’ve changed the way people dress,” says Roberts.

As to what happens next, forecasting or consultancy seems like the most obvious move – “although we are also meeting with investors and expanding worldwide”.

Wavey Garms now have sellers and buyers in the Netherlands, as well as interest from Australia and Denmark: “One of the voluntary admin guys is from Copenhagen so it’s made it there,” says Roberts. It’s even become a status symbol: “When he tells people what he does they’re very impressed, especially the girls. People have hooked up, or formed friendships through a shared love of style. It’s beautiful.”


http://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2014 ... -in-the-uk

when i get some time later i will scan a few articles from proper mag and throw them up, very good stuff.
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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby stappard_ » Mon Mar 16, 2015 10:08 am

numerous wavey garmists spotted on a bad choice night out in west london on friday night

not made in chelsea west london but that sort of west london where VICE might write an article about the death of the suburban dream

- zx flux is the crepe of choice
- cdg play matters to these people
- washed jeans. like, really washed jeans. ripped
- fake supreme
- real palace
- nhs specs
- vintage 90s fleeces abound. the weirder the brand the better
- basically the whole feel in Q1 2015 is d'ya-like-dags-era brad pitt


- girls uniform is bomber and docs
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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby pirxthepilot » Mon Mar 16, 2015 10:17 am

interesting, i don't see this around my bit of east london, possibly im just too old and blank it out, or maybe the whole area is too self-conscious anyway, everyone here either is or thinks they should be a trend spotter/digital brand strategist yadda yadda
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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby maj » Mon Mar 16, 2015 10:25 am

class got canceled

RISE OF THE JOHNHEAD

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PROPER EDIT FT TOO HOT

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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby maj » Mon Mar 16, 2015 10:35 am

UNIFORMES GENERALE

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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby stappard_ » Mon Mar 16, 2015 10:40 am

circa 2003 you were nothing if you didn't have a JD sports bag for your PE kit

the next level was having an empty JD sports bag worn round the front with nothing in it and then refusing to do PE
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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby maj » Mon Mar 16, 2015 10:49 am

worcester forgate st maccy's is my fave on a saturday night, just before the drinkers come out around 10/11 you see all the college folk standing about wearing windbreakers and skinny jeans with a shoe of choice. you can tell the difference between the heads and the followers as the ones behind will have whatever the local jd stocks where as the heads will have some pair they travelled to brum too/ scoped out online. several times i've been called out by these people walking back from work when i'm in a si shirt or the like.

the truest head i see on occasion always looks great rocking vntg polo/si caps with his other related bits, huge tnfs paire with some great choice in wheels, puma suedes older c/w's of am1. we exchange nods on occasion.
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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby CPV1 » Mon Mar 16, 2015 11:07 am

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It's all about this kinda look in London at the moment. It seems like everyone I know is cracking out old Fila and Ellesse gear. Like I look around a club these days and I'm surrounded by tracksuits and bobbing baseball caps. Even I bought a couple recently. I think it's to do with garage being so popular again.

Also, I suppose, people not wanting to be seen as "hipsters" while out in trendy parts of London. Like trying to completely disassociate themselves from that look of beards and flannel shirts by taking it super urban and street. As if they're really from the ends.

Started spotting quite a few Avirex jackets out and about as well. Pretty sure that's just because they're always mentioned in early grime lyrics, which is obviously pretty popular these days.
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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby maj » Mon Mar 16, 2015 11:12 am

despise the word chave but,

http://www.standard.co.uk/fashion/trend ... 28441.html


Is the "chivster" a thing, then? According to LS:N Global — the trends network of the Future Laboratory — he is. Specifically, he is a hipster bored with the bearded lumberjack trope and eager to add a bit more "edge" and grit into his look.

This means short hair, clean-shaven cheeks and the augmentation, undercutting or offsetting of elements of his carefully curated Shoreditch Twat wardrobe with the kind of vintage sportswear, Burberry caps and chunky jewellery associated in an earlier age with the chav. I say he, because the chivster is, apparently, a he.

"You hear so much about women supplanting men in the boardroom and John Gerzema’s Athena doctrine [which asserts that women will run the future] — it was looking as if men were on the decline in some respects, amid a massive surge of empowerment for women," says Peter Firth, Insight editor of LS:N.

"With hipsterism so ubiquitous in east London, men are bored with that identikit look and looking for different means to assert manhood."

He identifies Reebok Classics and Adidas tracksuits as key items of the look, with “wraparound shades” sometimes giving a more “European” twist. It’s lads who grew up in the Noughties embracing elements of chav fashion “almost for kitsch value”, rather than wholeheartedly embracing underclass stereotypes (so no mobility scooters or XL Asda trackpants, for instance).

Hmmm. Let’s leave aside the doubtful assumption that the patriarchy has been overturned. What about the dynamic implied by the terminology? “Both hipster and chav are pejorative terms,” concedes Firth.

LS:N’s report advises brands that “the word chav still reminds many of class-war wounds, and so any embracing of chivster should be wholehearted and in the sincerest of spirits”.

That may not be enough. LS:N describes the clean, sharp aesthetic of John Holt’s LAW magazine as emblematic of the chivster look, but Holt says: “I’m going to have a word with them about that. It’s something I’d never say or ever want to be associated with, and completely at odds with everything the magazine stands for.

“I think it’s spiteful and derogatory to brand people with a name like that. Who would want to be a chivster? It’s hardly ‘We are the mods’, is it?” (LS:N also namechecks designer Nasir Mazhar and the FunkyOffish faux-bling jewellery line.)

Undoubtedly there are people out there archly appropriating working-class fashions that were once beyond the pale: you can see them on the streets. But the chivster label reminds me of Will Ferrell’s fashion designer character Mugatu in Zoolander, who shows a collection called Derelicte “inspired” by the homeless.

All that’s required for a thing to become a “thing” is that enough people talk about it. Thus trends blogger Jim Whyte has already picked up LS:N’s term for this “new aesthetic” and it’s starting to circulate on Twitter (pity poor user Tom Chiverton, whose Twitter handle is @chivster).

We’ll know it’s over when the sixth form at Marlborough College look like extras from Shameless and there’s a street-level backlash in favour of silk toppers and morning suits. Toffsters, anyone?
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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby maj » Mon Mar 16, 2015 11:19 am

https://i-d.vice.com/en_gb/article/intr ... lad-casual


What the hell am I wearing?! How did this… What's happening to me? Sometimes I have to ask myself these sorts of questions when I look in the mirror. Recently my clothes have started slipping into the sort of young men's uniform of the time, what's been called "lad casual" or the "new casual" (or even the "confused laddish"). You'll know the look I'm talking about, because it's everywhere in East London and elsewhere. It's a tidy combination of Supreme 5-panel hats, Palace T-shirts, Reebok classics or similar, accompanied by a lifestyle of liking football and pubs. A lot of these people are my mates and I'm not having a go at all, I like the style and borrow from it a lot, I'm just befuddled as to where it came from.

What these two wardrobes have in common is a crisp, clean aesthetic. There's a focus on comfort and athleticism, and box-fresh running shoes.

Also, while this look is very influenced by 90s East Coast skaters and 90s suburban British blokes - great - there's also a widespread alternative that's much more Joey Essex (although, in my opinion, he's also a really sharp dresser) and that's the deep house "shuffling casual" kids in cropped skinny jeans or denim cut-offs, plain T-shirts and monochrome Free Runs. Consider this very off-putting video of misplaced swagger and hats worn on bums. In the words of one of our favourite old i-D interns, Lewis: "Boys that wear Nikes, tanks and dance like this need to f*ck off." Obviously I'm much less sympathetic to this form, especially the music, which is simply awful, however I do still like their trainers.

What these two wardrobes have in common is a crisp, clean aesthetic. There's a focus on comfort and athleticism, and box-fresh running shoes. It looks good although, on the other hand, it's unadventurous and offers a somewhat tame, boyish vision of adulthood. In the words of writer Clive Martin, "'the new casual' is the movement which formed as an antithesis to the idea that we all had to grow beards, drink expensive beer and dress like railroad workers. It's clean-shaven, it smells good and it drinks cans of lager on the street. It doesn't care what clubs it goes to. It's sporty, streamlined, the return to a kind of teenage take on masculinity."

So, another thing that defines the "lad casual" style is that it's very different from hairy vintage hipsters with birds nesting in their beards. I'm totally happy for these sorts to make my coffee and cut my Swiss cheese, but personally I'm not going to dress like an Edwardian child-catcher under any circumstances. It has of course been noted that hipster culture has adopted a lot of the tropes of traditional masculinity - bushy beards and twirly moustaches, lumberjack shirts and weathered workwear, massive wooden tables and stuff like that - and it has also been noted that a lot of hipster culture is horrendously misogynist, and only hides behind a cloak of irony in order to pretend that it's not. So it's totally for the best that men are finally throwing away their Barbour jackets, and other grown-up grouse beating apparel, in favour of a more modern, more youthful jizz.

The original New Lad culture wilted away like an obnoxious lettuce towards the end of the 20th century, sometime after Euro 96, and British masculinity's been in a crisis of sorts, and certainly we've been awful at international football ever since.

Today's attitude is also very different from that of the 90s "new lad", who was very loud, very boorish and wished he was from Manchester. Now it's about London and its orbital suburbs, everyone's neater and tidier, buttoned-up and polite. They're probably not going to bottle you in the pub. The clothing comes from an unexpected mix of skater and working class cultures, and that's what wants exploring. Palace, in particular, is dominating British streetwear right now and - alongside Nike as always - feels like the most influential menswear brand around. When they did the England kits with Umbro; that's the "lad casual" look in a nutshell. Honestly though how the hell did skating and football come together?

I asked Fergus Purcell, who originally designed the Palace triangle logo as well as this season's Marc By Marc Jacobs graphics, about the traditional football casuals look, and this is what he had to say: "It's a great look and it's tough, it's very stylish, it's the best of all worlds… Personally though, ideologically, I grew up in the time in the 80s when really there was a big divide between, you were a soccer type of bloke or you weren't - and I wasn't. I kind of wasn't allowed into that party and I was like, 'Fuck you!' and that look still sort of has those connotations for me. I actually admire the style… it's just that there was mutual antagonism, and them being tough lads it was more antagonism from that side, when I was growing up... But I think it's cool that that's not a factor in how people see things now. I love how, generationally, things gradually, gradually shift and then they're completely on someone's menu that they wouldn't have been ten years ago."

Obviously subcultures aren't as clearly delineated and separated out as in the past. The original New Lad culture wilted away like an obnoxious lettuce towards the end of the 20th century, sometime after Euro 96, and British masculinity's been in a crisis of sorts, and certainly we've been awful at international football ever since. Lads' magazines have fallen by the wayside too, with their topless, soapy visions of commuter-belt babes and coy Big Brother contestants cruelly usurped by horribly hardcore internet pornography. Everyone's turning into something else.

As football as a source of national pride and teenage flintstone has deteriorated, skating has sort of taken over, and you can trace this back to the turn of the century, when today's early-20-somethings were starting high school, beginning to come of age, and Sk8er Boi was topping the charts. If you wanted to snog Avril Lavigne (and who didn't?) you'd better have Zoo York jeans, lots of pop and sweet nollie hardflips to impress her. Skateboarding was absolutely exploding at this time - even more so than any alternative music movement really, as it was able to subsume rap and post-post-punk and nu-metal and everything good into itself, like Gargantua - and rolling fast into the mainstream. Jackass, which ran from 2000-2002, sold us the dream of Bam Margera skating (relatively badly, but then he was willing to jump off very big things), and messing around in his parents' house, and making so much money that he could just drive around in sports cars and sleep with mega-babes. It was very other to the classic skater ethos, but very in keeping with traditional adolescent fantasies. At the time Bam and his acolytes appeared as invincible men-children, forever young piss-takers like Peter Pan, long before laughing gas addiction and a terrible car crash and other unfortunate incidents turned everything to darkness.

Today the best skaters are multi-millionaire superstars, the most handsome ones show up in fashion magazines and the X-Games and Street League are bombastic competitive sporting events like any other, with lots of Nike sponsorship. When I was growing up in the noughties Nike were selling limited edition Air Force Ones in Slam City and you couldn't buy them unless you could kickflip in front of whoever was working there. That's what it was like before the recession; having to land a kickflip to be allowed to buy some shoes… Now HTC have opened a skatepark in the cellar of Selfridges and Converse have opened one next to the churches in Peckham, and the House of Vans opens in the Old Vic Tunnels this week.

The "lad casual" look is a sweet mixture of different subcultures, it comes from a place of peace and intermingling, it blows raspberries at the history of youth tribes and violence.

Over the last decade in Britain there's been a delirium in masculinity and an ongoing embarrassment in football. The male self-image has been shattered into so many pieces because these days you could be waxed and tanned like TOWIE; you could bulk up ridiculously like the boys of Geordie Shore; you could become a football fashionista like Daniel Sturridge; you could dream of shagging lots of stylists like Harry Styles. Almost everyone wears skinny jeans and there's no real prevailing narrative, it's not even considered that weird to wear jeggings or a really, really deep-V, although it obviously should be.

Young men are confused! Blame the absent fathers, blame the buyers at Topman, blame the Football Association, blame Rob Dyrdek if you wish, but whatever the cause there's commotion everywhere. Still, no-one should feel nostalgic for a time when skaters and football fans fought with each other. The "lad casual" look is a sweet mixture of different subcultures, it comes from a place of peace and intermingling, it blows raspberries at the history of youth tribes and violence. Also, as I can personally attest, you don't actually have to be a lad to wear any of it, and you don't really have to be able to kickflip down the Southbank Seven either; although you should join the Long Live Southbank campaign to save it. Because everyone likes skating now, even Jerry Seinfeld and Chris Rock: "I'll tell you one of the great activities is skateboarding. To learn to do a skateboard trick, how many times have you got to get something wrong 'til you get it right? And you hurt yourself, and you learn to do that trick, now you've got a life lesson. Every time I see those skateboard kids I think, 'Those kids'll be alright.'"
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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby pirxthepilot » Mon Mar 16, 2015 11:31 am

tangential but i signed up here after reading a post talking about how cool asian kids look wearing dishdasha, sliders and adidas track top. where can i see/read more about subcultures like that?

edit: i meant that i see that look a lot in my area, just surprised it is relatively undocumented, particularly given that there are like 17 trend spotters in every single coffee shop, also surely kids like that have tumblrs etc
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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby bels » Mon Mar 16, 2015 12:16 pm

Sknss linked me a photo essay about that once.

Alternatively be my friend on line for my mosque creepshots

Wonder if we could get a thread going about it
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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby wiggly--woo » Wed Mar 18, 2015 2:51 pm

noticed this article in the grauniad today, attempting to situate the "nu-lad" and how it relates to hipsterism and laddism.

i feel like its been written a bit late though - seems to write about it as if its some underground new look about to rise to the mainstream when, as far as i can tell, its been fairly mainstream for a wihile now.

Spoiler:
Nu-lads on the block

Forget the cringey ‘banter’. The post-hipster, post-Loaded lad is all about refreshing terrace style – think Reebok Classics and catwalk activewear

You may have seen nu-lad: he’s the guy in the pub with the shaved head or slicked-down fringe, his baseball cap tilted back. He’s probably wearing a pair of Reebok Classics and a bunch of labels, which seem at odds with fashion’s narrative: think Lonsdale, Ellesse, Fila, Puma, Reebok, Champion, alongside some higher-priced pieces by Supreme, Palace and Hood by Air. Imagine, if you will, a hipster that doesn’t look like a hipster. This is nu-lad, a 20-something guy from no discernible background, who prefers tracksuits to tweed, and a warm can of Stella over a pint of craft beer.

Drawing on an era wedged somewhere between Alan Shearer’s heyday and the birth of “banter site” the Lad Bible in 2012, nu-lad grew up and got a taste for sportswear as off-pitch clothing: he gave up boorish tracksuits and moved towards a conscious, rebellious “terrace-inspired” styling that encompasses affordable, nostalgic sportswear. The SS15 catwalks were a case in point, with collections by big names such as Balmain and Calvin Klein showcasing activewear, sportswear and streetwear, albeit with a high-fashion twist via plastic, neoprene and colour-blocking, alongside emerging labels such as Christopher Shannon, Y-3, James Long and Astrid Anderson. Think football kit with mega price points.

According to Chris Sanderson, co-founder of trend forecasting agency the Future Laboratory, this look started to emerge last summer, around the same time that the hipster backlash started. But instead of one influencing the other, these two looks couldn’t be more disparate. “Hipster style – the flat caps and beards – was about trying to look older and more distinguished,” says Sanderson. “This nu-lad style is the opposite – it’s about looking young and real, and more masculine, too. It’s about youth trying to demarcate itself from the older generation of flat-white-swigging dandies.” In 2015, the latter not only feels passe but grown-up. New York Magazine refers to the post-2004 hipster and Sanderson adds: “The people who started this hipster look are now in their late 30s and early 40s. They are no longer part of youth culture. Nu-lad, if we can call it that, is the inevitable next phase of coolness.”

Another contributor is the ubiquity of sports-luxe (expensive leisurewear masquerading as sportswear), another trend near peaking point. The rise of Lonsdale could be seen as a reaction to £400 hoodies. Daryoush Haj-Najafi, senior editor of Complex UK, agrees, seeing it more as a “reaction” to the “pretend anti-consumerist mentality” of the so-called hipster look, and less about a “return to masculinity”.

Musicians are naturally pioneering this look: MC Skepta last year collaborated with wunderkind designer Nasir Mazhar and soundtracked his recent show. He did the same thing with Sports Direct, becoming its unofficial brand ambassador (“it’s the most fashionable shop in the UK true story,” says Haj-Najafi). Alongside him is Swedish rapper Yung Lean (North Face, Nike), musicians Drake (often seen in seminal-now-hip terrace-wear Stone Island), and Kanye West, who has collaborated with Adidas.

While examples littered the SS15 collections, it’s being reflected on the high street too. Later this week, Topman will launch its collaboration with French 1990s waterproofers K-Way. Adidas’s latest campaign is geared around the whole nu-lad aesthetic. Champion and Nike have concessions in Urban Outfitters. It’s almost close to becoming mainstream.

In certain circles, this look has always existed. Boys have always worn tracksuits. The obstacle to its emergence as a serious trend is, obviously, the word “lad”, which is laden with negative connotations. But the stereotype is changing – the Lad Bible (the 12th most read site in the UK) has admitted it is trying to rebrand its image as something broader, and a recent YouGov poll confirmed the “evolution”. This is a post-metrosexual, post-Loaded-reading guy who still drinks cans, likes chips, prefers dogs to cats and enjoys The Inbetweeners; he still wears Adidas and Nike. But he wants to do all of the above without being weighed down by the boobs and banter of the laddish culture we know and loathe.

Carri Munden, the designer behind seminal 2000s-style label Cassette Playa, has long been designing fashion for nu-lads, or as she calls it, “the future vision of masculinity”. But it’s her very-noughties SS15 collection, which feels more consciously reactive than ever, “totally no more beards and heritage”, she explains, when asked about the thinking behind it. “This nu-lad is the powerful identity of British working-class style,” an aesthetic she compares to the mods, which has been “a constant flintstone on my designs”. She namechecks labels such as Iceberg, Moschino and Sergio T and subcultures like “UK garage” and “terrace-casual”.

Of course, there is an argument that this style is as “disingenuous” as the pseudo-dandy look adopted by so-called hipsters, at least on some wearers. Andreas Branco – who founded Wavey Garms, a Facebook e-tailer that has huge success selling used, nostalgic sportswear by Champion and Stone Island, and running club nights (the most recent saw 600 kids dancing to Wookie and spilling beer all over their Tommy Hilfiger bumbags) – believes some are fetishing the style. “These people want to look working-class when they’re not,” he has said. But arguably much of fashion is about trying to identify with a certain tribe, be it 1960s dandy (Saint Laurent) or health goth (Alexander Wang). “Which I get,” continues Branco. “A lot of us grew up with this stuff. It’s cool that it’s back.”

To people like Branco, it’s less of a trend and more of a lifestyle. New magazines such as LAW, which stands for “lives and work”, appeal to this new demographic; it’s less the aspirational, middle-class reader and more “mates who work hard all day and drink in the pub” as its editor, John Holt, has said. Even the music scene is in on it, with British acts such as Only Real and Real Lies showcasing a new type of urban man. Though musically very different, both appeal to urban, melancholy youth, and they do so in Reebok Classics and Nike.

“What’s clear is that the hipster aesthetic needed to move on,” says Sanderson. “This next wave is inevitable. The point is – it feels genuine, a style that almost transcends fashion. And what the kids do, everyone else follows.”
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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby ramseames » Wed Mar 18, 2015 3:01 pm

Everything about that makes me feel like they're misinterpreting several separate trends and then trying to combine them into one thing.
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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby wiggly--woo » Fri Mar 20, 2015 6:04 pm

Even The Daily Mash is writing about it now...

Nu-Lads and hipsters in Brighton beach battle

A SEASIDE town is being plagued by confrontations between rival youth fashion tribes.

Brighton seafront has witnessed tense stand-offs as hipsters and so-called ‘Nu-Lads’ make the resort a no-go area.

Locals have been terrorised by hipsters descending on the town en masse on their Penny Farthings, facing off against Nu-Lads on their ironic BMXs.

Nu-Lad Tom Logan said: “There’s no hope for me and my generation. All we’ve got for kicks is a fashion narrative that incorporates high end and low end labels from Lonsdale to Palace and a style aesthetic that combines activewear and neoprene.”

Bearded hipster Nathan Muir said: “If these Nu-Lads fancy a tear-up they’re welcome to it. Whether it’s a Krautrock karaoke smackdown or a cupcake bake-off, we’ll meet them anywhere, any time.”

May bank holiday has been scheduled for the next major clash between the two tribes, with all police leave cancelled amid fears of passive-aggressive sneering on the pier.

Tom Logan said: “We’re hoping the boys will come down in numbers even though Nu-Lads are entirely the figment of a Guardian writer’s imagination.”


http://www.thedailymash.co.uk/news/soci ... 5031996451
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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby DeafIdiotGod » Fri Mar 20, 2015 6:13 pm

Four Pins wrote a response of sorts to the Guardian article

http://four-pins.com/style/nu-lad-worki ... -guardian/
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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby maj » Fri Mar 20, 2015 7:08 pm

Don't like that four pubs article, it presumes lack of shared cultural background. The kids wearing this shit were wearing it 10 years ago when they kicked footballs on the primary school playground, London and the Home Counties were all a wash of sportswear late 90s early 2000's then with lad culture and the emerging distinction of Middle class in the mid 2000s (hipsters, chinos, indie ect) was a reaction against that, subsequent rejection of working class roots, arguably linked to world events and the shift away from Blair government after it appeared to betray everyone. Now in this time of osterity people don't have that same belief that they can drag themselves up, and are becoming more socially aware, as well as other cultural elements from music and film bringing it all together pushing this in the fashion sphere. (Someone takes social sciences, right?)

If this was kids in Eton suddenly donning all this in a vacuum I could see his point, but the fact it's simeotaneous amongst teens up and down the country, combined by teens and other cultural elements pushing it I don't see the argument he wants. While I agree with his argument as a whole when applied to other contexts, using this as the veil seems a bit off, when fashion mega corps start selling it yeah he's got a point (gosha cdg), but teens buying vintage garms they probably owned/ wanted/ knew of at some point anyway? Nah. Also no idea on the race comment? Half this stuff comes from predomantnly White working class and multicultural backgrounds, calling it all "black mans clothes" is sketchy in itself as well as ignorant to the cultural backgrounds of half the things he's listed. Of course there is some exceptions that you can hold to his point, and the gaurdian writing this article probably does seem a little weird considering who they write for, but all in all holding everyone too it seems bare odd.
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Re: Wavey garms/ Johnheads/ banter lads

Postby bels » Sat Mar 21, 2015 4:24 pm

Can't tell if the gaurdian typo is the classic diss on their constant typos or just a typo.
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