required readings

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required readings

Postby charybdis » Fri Oct 18, 2013 2:24 pm

I enjoy reading longform journalism pieces but I feel like a lot of clothes related journalism is either super utilitarian or kinda wishy washy and boring. I was wondering if we could share particularly well written pieces that were enjoyable to read.

I bring this up because I just pulled this profile of Daphne Guiness in the New Yorker for someone in FFA.

Not exactly "highbrow" but I also really liked this profile of the inventor of spanx.

Edit: They don't necessarily have to be long. Just something that you would have enjoyed reading even if you didn't give a shit about the designer/about fashion.

And while we're at it, here's a book review by John Updike of a book about power dressing and suits that I just found.
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Re: required readings

Postby rjbman » Fri Oct 18, 2013 2:28 pm

This is awesome, I have a half hour break or so between a few of my classes and usually enjoy sending articles to my kindle.
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Re: required readings

Postby can- » Sun Oct 20, 2013 12:26 pm

someone tell me if this vice bit on ervell is any good

http://www.vice.com/read/the-evolution-of-patrik-ervell
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Re: required readings

Postby bels » Sun Oct 20, 2013 5:55 pm

aldaily.com
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Re: required readings

Postby charybdis » Wed Nov 06, 2013 7:30 am

An article in the New Yorker about Supreme resellers.

“I’ve brought in seven figures a year for the last two years,” said Peter, the owner of the store, a thirty-year-old who refused to give his last name or be photographed. “I can’t show my face—I’m under a lot of eyes,” he said, sitting on a stool inside Unique Hype Collection last week. (Peter was actually under only four eyes: two posters of Lady Gaga looking at the camera while modelling a Supreme T-shirt hung on the ceiling above him.) “I do everything myself. With the eBay store, I even pack it and ship it myself,” he said, before pausing and thinking about this for a second. “Actually, I don’t drive myself. I have a driver.”


Pretty colorful stuff.

Edit: whoops, didn't realize that starfox had already posted this to the Supreme thread. Sorry bb.

Here's a piece on a fake model funeral.
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Re: required readings

Postby germinal » Wed Nov 27, 2013 12:40 pm

Nike’s Spirit Machine

Courtesy of our friends at 032c, BoF brings you an exclusive excerpt from Jonathan Olivares' piece on HTM, a three-person design collaboration between Nike chief executive Mark Parker, designer Tinker Hatfield and cultural consultant Hiroshi Fujiwara, conceived “to amplify new innovations, reinterpret existing designs, and explore concepts that take the brand to new places.”
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Re: required readings

Postby can- » Wed Nov 27, 2013 3:35 pm

the air mocs in that first photograph are so lovely
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Re: required readings

Postby charybdis » Thu Jan 16, 2014 8:48 pm

Lena Dunham in Vogue as a little girl.

There's no Prada allowed in one downtown household. Laurie Simmons and Carroll Dunham's eleven-year-old daughter, Lena, has a street edge that could leave even Miss Schnabel feeling momentarily inadequate. "I tried to model this after Helmut Lang," says Lena, showing off a shift she sewed herself. Her fashion pronouncements are something you'd expect from a woman (at least) three times her age: "I tend not to go for trends. You can only wear them for two weeks . . . . I really like Jil Sander, but it's so expensive.... I find Calvin Klein really hard to respect because he's everywhere. I view him as a clothesmonger . . . . Manolo is really classy." Then she returns to preteen reality—"But five dollars a week [i.e., her allowance] isn't really enough. I'm just looking."
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Re: required readings

Postby odradek » Tue Feb 18, 2014 2:40 pm

Intro to a book of essays by Arthur Danto on the end of Art

i bring this up because of how i perceive a difference between the representational aspects of clothing, which is to say, the pieces themselves, and the dialogue that clothes have and how that dialogue often becomes confused with the consumption of the product. people talk about copfreezes, being bored or excited by their wardrobes but that all feels kind of...superficial, like the internet conversation has wiped out or overstimulated that strictly aesthetic relationship with clothing. has conversation on the internet created [the need for] a post-aesthetic relationship with clothes in order for participation in the fashion world in a non-designer capacity to be worthwhile or interesting?

this isn't to suggest that relationship no longer exists, it's just that it has an endpoint, a cul-de-sac you can ride your trike around and still have a good time but never go anywhere. people become happy or content or discontent with their wardrobes and i argue that it's because we've done what we can in that domain and to be involved with clothing in a satisfying way, a different, additional relationship to your wardrobe is necessary.
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Re: required readings

Postby teck » Tue Feb 18, 2014 2:57 pm

how would you talk about clothes without talking about clothes?
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Re: required readings

Postby bels » Wed Feb 19, 2014 11:49 am

Is it because we're all modern individualists and therefore the clothes themselves aren't as interesting to us as our relationship to the clothes, which clothes we curate, etc?

A personal relationship to clothes is definitely easier to talk about, needs less historical knowledge and specialist language. As a result it's more immediate and relevant to more people, so more people talk about it. It's also a more circular and annoying discussion sometimes.

It reminds me of ben's designer friend. ben said she is "Not interested in the hobbyist aspect of fashion." and who can blame her when some hobbyist discussions are so banal. (Obviously consider myself guilty of this)

Then again there are few shows/lookbooks/pieces that aren't presented as "something you could buy" so is it so weird that the majority of the discussion is about whether people want it or not? It would be lame to go to an art museum and only talk about which paintings you'd buy to put in your living room, but then again paintings aren't mass produced, placed for sale, and then discounted if they don't move (generally)

Also reminds me of the common wish to "quit the game" and not actually care about what clothes one is wearing, just follow "fashion" and appreciate it for what it is and wear all Margaret Howell 1998 every day for the rest of your life.
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Re: required readings

Postby smiles » Tue Feb 25, 2014 9:28 am

nice reading. It's not really saying anything novel but it did nicely condense the last 600 years of western pictorial to non-pictorial art rather succinctly. I'm not sure how I feel about his criterion that art must be about something/have internal meaning. Because that traps it within the problems of interpretation and what various artists and critics have to say about it.


transferring that to clothes, meaning/interaction in a non-aesthetic (you could say philosophical or perhaps emotional vis a vis personal experiences) mode is pretty hard to parse. Seems to me that it can only really be accomplished through contemplation. Alternatively, we could approach clothes 1) functionally (which is the mode of the vast majority of americans) either in full function or non-function or disrupted/modified function, 2) culturally, which is to say examine the cultural expectations and uses of a various object and then interact with it either according to or against these uses, or 3) philosophically.

all three of these modes are not new ways to approach clothing at least in their positive modes. As people 'who like clothes' however, we could learn from these modes to approach clothing from a non hobby non aesthetic perspective.

is it possible to have a non-representational relationship with clothing? the act or wearing conforms a garment to a representation or operates through its denial. even a square bit of cotton takes on representational qualities when worn. to not wear an item is to deny it of a fundamental property though.

Architecture, i think, can provide some solutions. I was reading stuff by peter eisenman last semester (he's a hack though) and early in his career he expressed the desire to form an autonomous architecture, that is to say, an architecture that is generated from within itself and is not dependent upon any outside meaning or mode. Borrowing from his friend Derrida he wanted to disconnect (deconstruct) the sign from the signified. The classic example is of the column. In architeture the sign of the column is the same as what is signified, the function and appearance of the column are one and the same. A column is a vertical element that supports the crossbeams and operates as a unit. column is defined by function. Eisenman wanted to separate these so he created a wall with a surplus of supporting elements: a wall and a column in such number that it is impossible to tell which bit is doing the actual supporting. function is obscured and the sign flattens out. ANYWAY. is it possible to create such a disconnect in clothing? What would that look like (not simply aesthetically). Don't think too hard though because eisenman is a hack. But these kind of exercises could be a different approach to clothing.
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Re: required readings

Postby Syeknom » Sun Mar 23, 2014 11:42 am

Telegraph published an interesting insight into the world of Yoox: How Yoox became the Amazon of the fashion world

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Re: required readings

Postby Stingray Sam » Sun Mar 23, 2014 2:50 pm

Here straight-on but still seductive product shots for yoox.com and the many mono-brand sites are cranked out with martial efficiency.

This makes me think that the author has never visited Yoox.com

Also this article is awesome. This article makes Yoox seem like one of those companies that embodies everything i love about business. Logistics are such an interesting portion of business and i love learning about new innovations. Especially since it seems almost unique to find a company that uses efficient logistics. Also i just want to reiterate from my rep comment that that warehouse is absolutely amazing
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Re: required readings

Postby can- » Mon Mar 24, 2014 4:43 pm

I've had so many dreams where I enter the yoox factory
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Re: required readings

Postby iamacyborg » Mon Mar 24, 2014 6:55 pm

Stingray Sam wrote:
Here straight-on but still seductive product shots for yoox.com and the many mono-brand sites are cranked out with martial efficiency.

This makes me think that the author has never visited Yoox.com

Also this article is awesome. This article makes Yoox seem like one of those companies that embodies everything i love about business. Logistics are such an interesting portion of business and i love learning about new innovations. Especially since it seems almost unique to find a company that uses efficient logistics. Also i just want to reiterate from my rep comment that that warehouse is absolutely amazing


You'd be surprised.

Company I used to work for had over a million SKU's in a single warehouse, the logistics of the hole things always surprised the hell out of me.

/edit

Regarding the efficient photo bit, slide 17 here is relevant.
http://cdn2.yoox.biz/yooxgroup/pdf/yooxgroup_analyst_investor%20day_vfinal_0.pdf
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Re: required readings

Postby Syeknom » Tue Mar 25, 2014 1:01 pm

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Re: required readings

Postby pips » Thu Apr 03, 2014 10:32 pm

The Secret World of Fast Fashion

http://www.psmag.com/navigation/business-economics/secret-world-slow-road-korea-los-angeles-behind-fast-fashion-73956/

Interesting to see how Korean-Americans were able to dominate the fast fashion market in the US in just two generations. It also shows how different the production process of these Korean-owned fast fashion manufacturers from say, Inditex in Europe.
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Re: required readings

Postby germinal » Tue Aug 12, 2014 7:56 am

We were having coffee in the Patrons Lounge at the Met, at a midmorning hour when nobody else was there. Bolton looks like the perennial English schoolboy. He is reed-thin, with neatly parted brown hair, and he was dressed that day in a narrow-cut gray suit, a white button-down shirt with the collar points unbuttoned, no socks, and trousers that stopped well above the ankle. His shoes had taps on the toes and heels, which clattered irreverently against the museum’s marble floor.

Profile of one of the curators of the Met's Costume Institute in the lead up to the punk exhibition last year
http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2013/ ... -unleashed


Technically, Avedon’s work shows little reverence for the ideals of sharpness and accuracy that are still the goal of most commercial photographers. Not being concerned with realism, Avedon sometimes deliberately reproduces the imperfections of elementary photography in order to create pictures that have an unrehearsed and improvised—almost accidental—air about them.

1958 profile of the photographer Richard Avedon
http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/1958/ ... n-the-rain


Show days are tense for any fashion designer—a season’s worth of sales can ride on the result—but Galliano had more on his mind than clothing. He was keeping a secret from hundreds of his employees at Dior, from scores of fashion writers who had just arrived in Paris, even from many of his closest friends: three days earlier, Galliano’s father had died, and, at exactly the moment that his presence in the Dior atelier, on the Avenue Montaigne, was considered essential, Galliano had flown to Gibraltar to bury him.

John Galliano profile immediately before his Autumn 2003 Christian Dior Haute Couture show
http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2003/ ... -fantasist


Last year, her first at the store, she sold around two million dollars’ worth of merchandise. Combining old-fashioned sales psychology with new technologies, Victoria moves the merchandise in ways that seem magical even to the people who hired her.

Following Prada's leading salesperson in 1998
http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/1998/ ... ias-secret


His father’s interests ranged from Buddhism to astrology, and he did not allow a television in the house until Owens was sixteen. He required his son to read canonical works of literature and philosophy—Marcus Aurelius, Aristotle, Confucius—and to listen to classical music. “I developed this method of child-rearing after reading Thomas Wolfe’s statement ‘You can’t go home again,’ ” John told me. “I always interpreted that to mean it’s because you outgrow things. Well, I always wanted to expose Rick to things he couldn’t grow out of.”

Rick Owens profile from 2008
http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2008/ ... t-monsters


By mid-2004, with money saved from a cancelled graduation trip to Italy and the sale of Kate’s collection of rare albums (a first pressing of the Velvet Underground’s self-titled début album, Lou Reed’s “Berlin,” X’s “Los Angeles”), they had cobbled together sixteen thousand five hundred dollars to start their line.

Following Rodarte's Mulleavy sisters between their Autumn 2009 and Spring 2010 collections
http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2010/ ... ed-sisters


One of his favorite tricks was to use designer-leather trim to turn a generic garment—even a generic mink coat—into a name-brand one. His quest for the right material sometimes took him to the Gucci boutique, where he would puzzle the clerks by buying every garment bag in the shop. The long leather panels, printed with the Gucci logo, were perfect for the jackets he wanted to make. “You could get a complete yoke, front and back,” he says. “But it was costly.”

The story of Dapper Dan's Boutique
http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2013/ ... arlem-chic


Strivers upgrading their wardrobe for a promotion—in the boardroom or at the altar—invest in Halbreich’s expertise, though on that score she has a “strict policy,” she says. “I don’t take the second wife if I’ve dressed the first one, and I don’t take the mistress.”

2012 profile of a Bergdorf Goodman personal shopper
http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2012/11/12/ask-betty


Toward the end of the year, Yoox got a large order for expensive women’s shoes, which someone noticed came from a convent in Umbria. Like the Pope, the nuns apparently liked wearing fancy shoes—and they weren’t flats. “When we figured out who had made the order, we called the convent and told them they could have the shoes for free,” Marchetti told me. “The nuns said they would pray for us. So maybe that explains our success.”

The C.E.O. of Yoox, this time from 2012
http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2012/ ... ek-of-chic
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Re: required readings

Postby amathew » Tue Aug 12, 2014 11:46 am

Digging through the threads on Stylezeitgeist's "designers and their work" section is worth a look. I've read a number of "news" articles linked on there. Unfortunately, I haven't bookmarked them...so happy hunting

http://www.stylezeitgeist.com/forums/fo ... y.php?f=56
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Re: required readings

Postby sagc » Fri Aug 15, 2014 3:35 pm

Not any one article, but here's an issue of The New Inquiry that's focused on fashion - http://thenewinquiry.com/wp-content/upl ... d-iPad.pdf
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Re: required readings

Postby Iliam » Mon Aug 18, 2014 4:29 am

What is the most significant fashion innovation in history?

http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2014/09/the-big-question/375078/
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Re: required readings

Postby CleanThug » Mon Aug 18, 2014 8:44 pm

amathew wrote:Digging through the threads on Stylezeitgeist's "designers and their work" section is worth a look. I've read a number of "news" articles linked on there. Unfortunately, I haven't bookmarked them...so happy hunting

http://www.stylezeitgeist.com/forums/fo ... y.php?f=56


so many of the images are unavailable :(

or is it just my computer?
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Re: required readings

Postby maj » Wed Aug 20, 2014 5:14 am

something i wrote for mymum (please don't ask why)

Spoiler:
Casual culture is quite board, there have been many waves and the history is quite different to the area I will be focusing on which is the post 1960 era to where I would say the emergence of the casual we recognise today starts.

Fashion and football violence have gone hand in hand ever since the rise of the teddy boys back in the 1950’s, influenced by Edwardian fashion these groups wore it almost like a uniform for their group activities. As the 1960’s swung around these styles faded and you had the introduction of the mods and the skinheads to the scene wearing anything from suits and fishtails on one hand to docs and suspenders on the other. One thing has always remained constant and that’s the importance of fashion and image to these people. The subculture takes its first steps into the sportswear mecca we know today when Liverpool and Everton when Liverpool had their 1977 European Cup quarter final against the French side St Etienne. It sent British supporters across the channel for the first time and showed them what the continent is wearing, luxury sportswear brands from Italy and trainers from adidas and other European manufacturers. After a quick looting trip and a fight they set of home with their newly acquired look and got right to work putting it in place.

They stood out from your standard mod or rocker when they turned up to a firm meet, ditching their brogues and docs for a pair of soft soled adidas and the suspenders for a sweater from Lacoste. Strolling up as a firm to meets being regarded as “pretty boys” they still dealt the same punch they had before but now with the benefit of blending in with the regular crowds. As police were looking for skinheads, mods and rockers to target and search these men in designer clothing waltzed on by unknown to the police with what was unfolding under their noses. It was this ability to move unchecked which caught onto other firms as they came in contact with Liverpool, people went crazy for it and you had working class and middle class boys to adults scrambling to drop huge portions of their pay check on the latest designer fashion (sound familiar?) or run the risk of stealing it when on tour to a rival town.

It was in the late 80’s that the casual hit their peak with a combination of notoriety being at an all-time high as these people in their community were seen as untouchables, the top boys being able to go wherever they wanted in their networks. Off set by the rising political pressure to crack down on football violence and Margaret thatcher promising to take a heavy hand on sentencing for anyone caught partaking labelling events at home and abroad an “embarrassment”. The nail in the coffin came from the introduction of the growing acid house, rave scene in Manchester which attracted the same crowd. If you ever need to calm angst ridden teen youth drugs are always the answer.

It was in the mid 90’s and late 2000’s casuals had picked up again but the people had changed and so had the styles. You had a lot of guys who had grew out of the rave scene and now had full time jobs and incomes looking to recapture their youth from the dull cubicle they worked in. shift of brand focused moved away from sportswear to designer brands like Prada, Burberry, Hugo boss or Paul smith (before the commercialisation) as well as the classic jackets from that of stone island and cpcompany with the sweaters and polos from the likes of lacoste and fredperry transitioning over. It was very much a new look for a new time. this time also brought the era of cctv to England and made operating a traditional firm hard, any fighting or riots were quickly shut down with new police tactics like kettling or the use of air support to follow and track known trouble makers, with the liberal handing out of bans from clubs be it years or life. Now as it stands casual is a surface image, people reliving their youth or romanticising others with most the top boys now being friends and discussing the good old days like many do as they grow up. Many brands set up to capitalise on this like that of the peaceful casual and so on.

the reputation of these people are of course over shadowed by the violent past of these groups (arguably more so than the rockers, punks, mods) and that we do not glorify, and i don't think they themselves would either. innocent people get caught up and there were some stray targets. but on the level of most youth culture movements, revolving around tribe like mentality, music and fashion it really is quite endearing.

Extra reading // sources

http://www.football-hooligan.com/footballcasuals.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teddy_Boy

http://80scasuals.io.ua/s32932/history. ... all_casual

http://fluoglacial.free.fr/index.php?20 ... s-football

http://vividriot.wordpress.com/2012/01/ ... and-music/

film/TV recommendation to get a dramatised feel

* away days (prince and pauper tale set in a angsty, casual setting)

* the firm (new and remake) (both good, new one is again nick love)

* football factory (to the point 90/2000's nick love'ism arguably "bad")

* cass (follows the whole era from boyhood to adulthood, "true story")

* the real football factories with Danny dyer (bit laughable at points danny.)

* casuals a documentary on the topic

http://imgur.com/a/6EQLq, instagram has a somewhat large following of revivalist/ex casual


music to get you in the mood


soft cell

new order

the ceasers

oasis

kasabian

blur

arctic monkeys

razorlight

pretty much any britpop between 1980 and now

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Re: required readings

Postby charybdis » Sun Sep 07, 2014 4:56 pm

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Re: required readings

Postby BIGBEE » Wed Sep 10, 2014 8:20 pm

If anyone has knows of any long form journalism articles about ACRONYM I'd love to read them
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Re: required readings

Postby rjbman » Wed Sep 10, 2014 9:44 pm

@bigbee It's a SISP interview with Hugh, but still pretty cool.
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Re: required readings

Postby breakadawn » Thu Sep 11, 2014 6:14 am

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Re: required readings

Postby bels » Sun Sep 21, 2014 4:59 pm

http://mobile.nytimes.com/blogs/tmagazi ... blogs&_r=1

Pretty depressing article about the modern world's obsession with branding and boringness. Focusing on SLP
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Re: required readings

Postby yoyobeat » Sun Sep 21, 2014 5:18 pm

@bela, thanks for sharing.

"Today, as high fashion moves closer to mass media — with brand-hosted YouTube channels, films, huge spectacles — there is pressure to simplify." Sums it up well.

"Holland Cotter, an art critic for The Times, wrote, “We’re in an age of remake culture, an epidemic of re-enactment fever.” " Everyone loves the music metaphor of sampling. But I'd say creatives were always bricoleurs, just not so obviously, since now we have quick access to see where their flintstone came from; might have been less transparent pre-Internet.

I have a book recommendation for you and anyone else: http://www.amazon.com/Brand-New-Jane-Pa ... 1411223744

I'm reading this right now, about half-way through, and some of the brands it references are old at this point but it's still an interesting and relevant read.
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