Vegan clothing

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Vegan clothing

Postby maj » Tue Sep 01, 2015 2:32 pm

NO LEATHER

NO WOOL

NO SILK

NO ANIMAL OR ANIMAL BY PRODUCT

JUST 100% SICK GARMS

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Re: veggy garms vs the environmental clock (3rd round knocko

Postby maj » Tue Sep 01, 2015 4:01 pm

currently looking for a waterproof sneak for winter after i was caught in the rain wearing palidas and it ruined my life

bobbin spoke to me about kings and umbrellas but here we are in this fashion hell hole where we torture ourselves under the false pretense of "utility"

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these r grails but sold out in my size, the goretex trimm trabbs have dead animal on them which makes me baaaaarrreeee sad

want 2 b alble to ride my bike in them, need to be a lowkey next crepe as running goretex ones are too bulky although a strong look.

excited 2 see what brand bring out this winter

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although not waterproof these r some sick trainers
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Re: veggy garms vs the environmental clock (3rd round knocko

Postby vgtbls » Tue Sep 01, 2015 7:24 pm

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The K-Swiss Belmont T (modeled here by @sknss) looks quite nice.
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Re: veggy garms vs the environmental clock (3rd round knocko

Postby vgtbls » Thu Sep 03, 2015 12:44 am

A lot of jeans you might rule out because of a leather patch may be in fact not leather. Almost all Levi's use a "leather-like" heavy card stock. None of their dyes used are animal-tested. Wear those 501s!

I think the biggest pitfall by a long shot is shoes. Belts, maybe? Certainly on the more formal side tougher to get around.

Would love to hear from Vegarm wearers about hidden animal products we might not know about.

Is mother-of-pearl a vegan product? I assume it isn't. Where do U draw the line??
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Re: veggy garms vs the environmental clock (3rd round knocko

Postby thephfactor » Thu Sep 03, 2015 1:07 am

shoes deffo a prob. wear my leather sneakers a lot, got them before turning veggie. how to replace? canvas i guess.

derbies more of a conundrum. I'll probably try to start out with Docs vegan lows, but other than that there don't really seem to be many options?
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Re: veggy garms vs the environmental clock (3rd round knocko

Postby bels » Thu Sep 03, 2015 2:50 am

Yeknoms rombaut derbies are really nice but I don't think it's a staple style
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Re: veggy garms vs the environmental clock (3rd round knocko

Postby JonjoShelvey » Thu Sep 03, 2015 4:53 am

as far as waterproofing goes i heavily recommend a waterproofing spray. i sprayed my wallabees(veg-god please forgive me) with some kiwi water resistant shit last winter and once it dried there was no discoloration and they were straight up water resistant. i haven't tried it on a synthetic material yet tho.
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Re: veggy garms vs the environmental clock (3rd round knocko

Postby thephfactor » Thu Sep 03, 2015 9:02 am

bela wrote:Yeknoms rombaut derbies are really nice but I don't think it's a staple style

Yeah those are amazing. But yeah, idk if they're a widely available thing.
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Re: veggy garms vs the environmental clock (3rd round knocko

Postby bels » Thu Sep 03, 2015 10:23 am

JonjoShelvey wrote:as far as waterproofing goes i heavily recommend a waterproofing spray. i sprayed my wallabees(veg-god please forgive me) with some kiwi water resistant shit last winter and once it dried there was no discoloration and they were straight up water resistant. i haven't tried it on a synthetic material yet tho.


Yeah but you can't waterproof like, a mesh.

Could waterproof some canvas sneaks maybe. I don't know it seems very hit and miss. could go totally worng could be OK. Doubt you'd get AMAZING results from anything.

Could use a wax based waterproofer but I guess it'd have to not be beeswax.
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Re: veggy garms vs the environmental clock (3rd round knocko

Postby quitter » Thu Sep 03, 2015 3:20 pm

vgtbls wrote:I think the biggest pitfall by a long shot is shoes.

i got u, flaxsisters
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Geta (下駄) (...) are a kind of sandal with an elevated wooden base held onto the foot with a fabric thong to keep the foot well above the ground. (...) Sometimes geta are worn in rain or snow to keep the feet dry, due to their extra height and impermeability compared to other footwear
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Re: veggy garms vs the environmental clock (3rd round knocko

Postby thephfactor » Thu Sep 03, 2015 4:19 pm

Would wearing those be cultural appropriation?
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Re: veggy garms vs the environmental clock (3rd round knocko

Postby JonjoShelvey » Thu Sep 03, 2015 6:06 pm

Most likely but even worse you'll look like a weaboo
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Re: veggy garms vs the environmental clock (3rd round knocko

Postby thephfactor » Thu Sep 03, 2015 7:08 pm

Ok thanks guys but It was a serious question.
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Re: veggy garms vs the environmental clock (3rd round knocko

Postby schiaparelli » Sat Sep 05, 2015 9:17 am

no I think that's always an important question to reflect upon when buying something that is culturally iconic and endemic to a certain group of people

a really good situation to analyze this in is when the Boston Museum of Fine Arts put on an event called "kimono wednesdays" to tie into the showing of a Claude Monet painting depicting Monet's wife wearing a red kimono. there was a huge outcry bc people found it culturally appropriative and the museum had to cancel the events, but the discussion around it raised some interesting points about the extent to which Japanese people find things culturally appropriative and offensive (vs appreciative and transformative).

@rosenrot sent me this excellent piece in The Japan Times, "Underneath the Orientalist Kimono"

The original protesters — who, though not Japanese, identified as Asian-American — said the museum was perpetuating a racist stereotype that exoticized Asian culture. That stereotype has its roots in the colonial era, when Europeans viewed non-Western cultures as an oversimplified selection of traits in a way that dehumanized them — known by cultural theorists as an “Orientalist” perspective…

the reaction to the exhibition from Japan — where the decline in popularity of the kimono as a form of dress is a national concern — was one of puzzlement and sadness. Many Japanese commentators expressed regret that fewer people would get to experience wearing a kimono.

In fact, many in the kimono industry see growth in foreign markets as essential to the garment’s survival, as two new books recently published on the subject show: “Kimono: A Modern History” by Terry Satsuki-Milhaupt, and “Kimono Now” by Manami Okazaki.

Satsuki-Milhaupt reveals the kimono to be a tool of nationhood and a projection of Japan’s self-image. She shows how, during the mid-1800s, Japan itself was complicit in encouraging tacit Orientalism by making the kimono a symbol of the unified national identity it created after opening its borders to the West in 1853.


there's also an interesting bit on the contemporary Japanese concern that adherence to tradition will marginalize the kimono as an essential element of Japanese culture

Satsuki-Milhaupt suggests that portraying the kimono as “traditional” will only diminish its relevance. In fact, deliberate attempts last century to preserve the kimono industry by turning its once-anonymous artisans to celebrities had the ironic effect of transforming it from everyday apparel into a rarely worn form of ceremonial dress.

Those efforts also froze the kimono in time, codifying the way it is worn in a set of rules now deemed so complex that only special schools are able to teach them.

“The real reason why traditional kimono culture is about to (become) extinct,” wrote avant-garde fashion designer Yohji Yamamoto, “is because of its tendency to aspire to ‘perfection’ as a style that does not allow any other foreign item to be added to it. My advice for anyone wearing kimono is to challenge this rigidity; let’s forget about attending kimono lessons.”


I guess I'm currently of the mind that

  • cultural appropriation isn't terribly offensive to Japanese people;
  • but Japanese-Americans (or other hyphenated Japanese-somethings in other countries) may still find it offensive, and their feelings are also valid given that they have to bear the brunt of offensive Japanese stereotypes interacting with their everyday lives much more keenly than Japanese people in Japan;
  • and then lots of people will find it culturally appropriative bc a vast quantity of borrowed cultural things in fashion are still offensive;
  • and then also it's hard to wear a lot of traditional garments (e.g. a full-on kimono, full-on geta) in a way that feels normalized and contextualized into today's fashion, instead of costume-y

I think geta will probably be the most wearable when someone does to them what Margiela did for tabis, bc right now they always feel a bit off, and even then (if Galliano releases a cool geta or whatever) you just know some street style "star" is going to try wearing them with some ludicrously ill-matched hype jacket, and then it'll all be a disaster
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Re: veggy garms vs the environmental clock (3rd round knocko

Postby TheLouisVuittonPawn » Wed Sep 09, 2015 11:41 pm

Native fitzsimmons are pretty slick, thinking about picking up a pair for winter

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Anyone have experience with native and know about quality, etc?
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Re: veggy garms vs the environmental clock (3rd round knocko

Postby ramseames » Wed Sep 09, 2015 11:50 pm

the material they're made from is weird, don't look or feel like regular shoes. quality is fine for what they are, not something you'd keep for more than a few years really but they're cheap

would function well in terms of keeping your feet dry at least

native is from van so i see them/other styles a ton here and I'm not a huge fan tbh

the apollo mocs with the microfibre upper are conceptually quite neat (even if they do look/wear sorta like roshes)
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Re: veggy garms vs the environmental clock (3rd round knocko

Postby rjbman » Thu Sep 10, 2015 7:33 pm

@twins you can just ask that in the thread lol

pretty sure (never can be 100% on c-t) this thread is about vegan garments that do not use any animal products in them
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Re: veggy garms vs the environmental clock (3rd round knocko

Postby yourdad » Fri Sep 11, 2015 12:16 am

@TheLouisVuittonPawn i've got a pair of those in blue that i bought back in 2010-2011. they're still holding fine but i really only wear them when it gets really cold (which isn't very often here). if you or anyone else is a size 11 and is willing to pay for postage, you're more than welcome to take them. it's been wayyy too warm here for them the past few years
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Re: Vegan clothing

Postby tomsfood » Mon Sep 28, 2015 11:55 pm

Since the spring I've slowly transitioned from meat eater to not meat eater. I still have a lot of old leather things (shoes, belts mostly) that I feel mixed up about. On one hand I hate wearing dead animal flesh on my body but on the other hand I don't want to be wasteful. I suppose I could donate them but someone out there is still using the dead animal flesh so idk. It's a bit of an internal debate.

I also made the decision to buy a pair of jeans even though they had a small leather patch. I feel kind of bad about it.

Anyways, I have a few questions with regards to shoes for people more experienced in the vegan market:

My leather nikes that I have worn pretty frequently for the last two years are deteriorating quickly. At some point I would like to replace them with a white shoe of similar shape. I think eytys would do the trick quite nicely (I love my black eytys) but they are kinda spendy. Vans has a fair few vegan options but nothing with the kind of profile I'd be interested I'm afraid. I'm open to really any material, as long as an animal didn't die to make the shoes. Anyone have any suggestions/general places to look?

They look like this
Spoiler:
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Also, looking ahead to winter and some shoes that might provide some respite from the winter apocalypse. Those native boots above seem like a decent option, what other brands make vegan wintry shoes? Doesn't necessarily need to be boots, just something thats not thin canvas like vans.

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I never used to get bothered by leather too much (probably because I didn't think about what it actually was) but now I just see it as animal flesh and it grosses me out so much. Especially like natural veg tanned leather, it's just so flesh-y. Like something used to live and breath in that hide and now its being used to hold up my pants? Eek. Kinda interesting that most people (myself not so long ago) are NOT weirded out by it. Agh now I feel really bad about buying those jeans again.
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Re: Vegan clothing

Postby Bobbin.Threadbare » Tue Sep 29, 2015 8:44 am

There's a decent chance those nikes aren't actually leather at all. Check in store on the label but the bulk of athletic sneakers aren't apart from certain trims or inners.

I think Good Guys Don't Wear Leather have a kind of tennis shoe thing. Not bought anything from them yet but I'd like to sometime.

I really don't seem to have as much of a rain anxiety as other people but I do wonder if it's just a bit of overthinking things. If you don't work outside and only use the outside world to commute and shop you can easily get by with canvas.
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Re: Vegan clothing

Postby Vaeltaja » Tue Sep 29, 2015 2:42 pm

What do y'all do about non-leather non-vegan shoe bits? Stuff like rubber, I mean. Brands like Rombaut specifically mention how their rubber is vegan sourced, but I remember reading somewhere that most rubber isn't. Do you just sorta go minimal loss (basically 'it's not leather so it did the least "damage"') or actually source super hard for allveganeverything?
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Re: Vegan clothing

Postby Bobbin.Threadbare » Wed Sep 30, 2015 4:43 am

The bulk of vulcanised rubber is not made with animal product because it's now more expensive and less commercially reliable than synthetics.

That said I think there's a sort of line here you need to draw yourselves. If you ever buy a car, a house, fly in a plane there's a good chance animal product was at some stage used somewhere. Steel manufacture sometimes still uses animal, tap water is filtered through bone char and white sugar is refined with the same.

I can only say where I stand: I dont want to choose suffering. I eat no flesh, wear no flesh. I don't drink the milk of imprisoned animals and I dont support the murder of creatures for animals. I dont drink beer with fish in it because its easily avoided and unnecessary and I live on plants.

If I was to completely avoid animal products in processing I wouldn't be able to get on the underground every morning. Or touch my fridge. Or run my tap.

The world is fucked, but I know that telling people that are vegan that they arent 'actually vegan' because paving slabs they walk on were made in in a victorian kiln with bone char puts people off entirely.

In short - I wouldn't worry about vulcanised rubber myself.
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Re: Vegan clothing

Postby Bobbin.Threadbare » Wed Sep 30, 2015 10:27 am

@Cowboy I'm aware of anthropocentrism - what exactly do you think I would take away from it? As it stands I think it's a bullshit world view one step removed from more extreme views that certain racial types are less than human and deserve less than human treatment.

My view is that humans are more evolved than most animals and as such can exert enlightened will as a privilege - but we are still all animals. Not that humans are special and animals are a commodity to serve us.
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Re: Vegan clothing

Postby Cowboy » Wed Sep 30, 2015 10:30 am

I was hoping you have

I wasn't supporting it. But have you looked into its critics?

I haven't read deeply, but a lot of your final point(s) have had attempts given to answer them, ranging from absolute extinction to mindset shifts.

They try not to be entirely defeatist

One outlook is Ecofeminism. I'm not familiar and can't offer author names (for any of this as a matter of fact, soz)

Probably could have cleared up that I meant the criticism of it! I'm not a fan of any master race/better race theory of any sort, believe me.

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Re: Vegan clothing

Postby sknss » Wed Oct 21, 2015 10:12 am

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Re: Vegan clothing

Postby SisterRayVU » Wed Oct 21, 2015 1:15 pm

Something I'm interested in incorporating as time goes on. It'll be a process, especially with wool, but minimizing suffering is a pretty good value and who cares about convenience or good looks when something else is hurt by it?
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Re: Vegan clothing

Postby parastexis » Wed Oct 21, 2015 1:21 pm

what are my options for cold weather trousers?
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Re: Vegan clothing

Postby raags » Wed Oct 21, 2015 9:43 pm

does anybody know about the work conditions of nike / adidas etc? are they still horrible like they were purported to be a few years ago? i'm not sure if avoiding animal products to still buy things that are made effectively on slave labour is a great compromise..
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Re: Vegan clothing

Postby Naka_ » Wed Oct 21, 2015 10:59 pm

@parastexis Yes because ethical discussion should be holistic.
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Re: Vegan clothing

Postby raags » Thu Oct 22, 2015 1:33 am

@parastexis well if your intention is to 'be a good vegan' then no, but if your intention is to 'consume ethically in ways that are sustainable in environmental and human costs' then yes. this isn't me trying to undermine people who don't want to consume animal products - i don't eat meat or fish, i don't buy leather, and try to avoid other animal products as well - but i don't really see the point if you are trading animal suffering for human suffering and think its an important thing to be aware of and not overlook in any framework where one is trying to consume ethically. i wasn't trying to be combative or condescending.
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