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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby ramseames » Sat Jul 30, 2016 6:43 pm

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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby jujumaster » Sun Jul 31, 2016 3:19 pm

Grailed is where regrettable purchases go to die.
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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby rublev » Sun Jul 31, 2016 5:35 pm

would anyone be interested in buying a schneider knit from two winters ago? i'm kinda allergic to mohair so every time i go close to it i think 'nope', but i've held onto it 'cos it's nice. gotta move it on now tho, i think. it's the blue one with kinda patches of difference shades. A+ condition "with tags". i'll take photos fyi. will prob ebay it but care-taggers first etc.
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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby Copeland » Mon Aug 01, 2016 11:59 am

Does anyone else get Christopher Shannon, Christopher Kane, and Christopher Raeburn mixed up? From a non-Brit.
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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby maj » Mon Aug 01, 2016 12:26 pm

I only try to remember the good one
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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby ramseames » Tue Aug 02, 2016 12:11 pm

raph to ck

https://www.businessoffashion.com/articles/news-analysis/raf-simons-calvin-klein-pvh?utm_source=Subscribers&utm_campaign=0075d7f33b-&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_d2191372b3-0075d7f33b-419342709

Spoiler:
NEW YORK, United States — It's official. Raf Simons has been named the new chief creative officer of Calvin Klein, formalising the Belgian designer's next move after three years as women's creative director of Christian Dior Couture.

The arrival of Simons at the helm of the iconic American brand comes soon after the news that Dior has hired Valentino co-creative director Maria Grazia Chiuri to design its women’s collections, replacing Simons, who resigned in October 2015 from the LVMH-controlled French luxury house.

Simons’ non-compete agreement is thought to have expired at the end of July, which explains why his appointment at the PVH Corp.-owned Calvin Klein, though widely anticipated in industry circles, was never confirmed by the company until today. The company took to social media — including Instagram, Twitter and Facebook — to communicate the news.

“The arrival of Raf Simons as chief creative officer signifies a momentous new chapter for Calvin Klein,” said Steve Shiffman, CEO of Calvin Klein, Inc. “Not since Mr. Klein himself was at the company has it been led by one creative visionary, and I am confident that this decision will drive the Calvin Klein brand and have a significant impact on its future. Raf’s exceptional contributions have shaped and modernised fashion as we see it today and, under his direction, Calvin Klein will further solidify its position as a leading global lifestyle brand.”

Calvin Klein has also appointed Pieter Mulier, Simons' longstanding right hand man, to the position of creative director, reporting directly to the designer. "Mulier will be responsible for executing Simons' creative and design vision for all men’s and women’s apparel and accessories lines within the Calvin Klein brand," the company said in a statement.

In April 2016, it was announced that Calvin Klein Collection designers Francisco Costa (women’s) and Italo Zucchelli (men’s) would exit the company, paving the way for a new global creative strategy, unifying all Calvin Klein brands under one creative vision.

Simons will indeed lead the creative direction for the company's entire stable of brands, including ck Calvin Klein, Calvin Klein Jeans and Calvin Klein, as well as the men’s and women’s ready-to-wear collections. Under this new arrangement, the designer will have complete creative control over everything from brand imagery — including underwear and fragrance campaigns — to diffusion lines and home goods, something he is said to have coveted at Christian Dior, where men’s fashion, store concepts and beauty were overseen by other designers.

At the same time, Simons has been a vocal critic of the current fashion system and the pressure it puts on designers throughout the creative process. It's unknown how Simons will approach a new creative directorship at another major conglomerate. "Technically speaking, it works. Does it work for me emotionally? No, because I’m not the kind of person who likes to do things so fast,” he told Cathy Horyn in a 2015 interview for System magazine. “I think if I had more time, I would reject more things, and bring other ideas or concepts in. But that’s also not necessarily better. Sometimes you can work things to death when you take too much time."

The appointment appears to mark a distinct shift in the Calvin Klein playbook. Ready-to-wear contributes less than $10 million a year to the company's $2.9 billion in annual revenue and has long been seen as a mere marketing platform for the wider brand.

"It’s not a business that contributes to the bottom line and it probably never will be,” Tom Murry, former president and chief executive of Calvin Klein, told BoF in 2011. “For us, it’s a marketing expense.” Currently, PVH operates just one Calvin Klein Collection retail store on Madison Avenue in New York City.

By giving creative control of the company to Simons, Shiffman and Calvin Klein Collection president Michelle Kessler-Sanders seem to be signaling renewed interest in designer fashion. The move also underscores the opportunity in high-end accessories, a major revenue driver for luxury brands like Dior and a category in which Calvin Klein has not yet made a name for itself.

It also gives Simons — one of the great talents of his generation — his largest commercial platform to date. While his minimalist leanings and a deep connection to youth culture both clearly align with the Calvin Klein brand, the wide reach of the business will certainly require Simons to think more broadly than before. Simons is known as a first-mover whose ideas are often appropriated and repackaged for larger audiences. But questions remain as to whether he is ready to communicate with the masses himself.

"Fashion became pop. I can’t make up my mind if that’s a good or a bad thing,” he told Horyn in 2015. “The only thing I know is that it used to be elitist. And I don’t know if one should be ashamed or not to admit that maybe it was nicer when it was more elitist, not for everybody. Now high fashion is for everybody."

Calvin Klein has been largely reliant on its licensing and wholesale business since the 1980s, shilling everything from women’s dresses to bedding. But its retail partners, such as Macy’s, are struggling to attract customers as the rise of e-commerce, direct retail and other market shifts continue to reshape the way people shop. By buying Warnaco Group for $2.9 billion in 2012, PVH made the first step in consolidating the Calvin Klein brand, taking direct global control of both the jeans and underwear businesses, licenses for which were previously held by the group. While there is only one Calvin Klein Collection store, PVH operates approximately 1,450 retail stores under the Calvin Klein, Tommy Hilfiger and Van Heusen trademarks, and 1,100 company-operated department store concessions (or shop-in-shops) under the Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfiger trademarks.

In 2015, Calvin Klein's reported revenue was $2.9 billion, up 2.2 percent from 2014 on a GAAP (generally accepted accounting principles) basis. A significant part of that comes from royalties attached to its fragrance license, which has been held by Coty since 2005 when the beauty manufacturer bought Unilever's global fragrance business for $800 million. Coty also owns the Calvin Klein colour makeup license, which it acquired in 2010 from Markwins International, although a 2012 launch of a "CK One Color" makeup line seems to have been put on hold.

If Calvin Klein is indeed going to put more emphasis on Collection — and pay Simons a reported salary of $18 million a year — the question becomes how this diverse array of businesses, with their different models, can operate in harmony under one creative umbrella. In an era of intense competition, some companies are taking another approach, streamlining their portfolios to focus on what they do best. LVMH, for instance, just sold its Donna Karan International business, in part, because DKNY's diffusion model was a poor fit with the group's expertise. Notably, it is G-III — the publicly traded company that acquired Donna Karan from LVMH for $650 million — that owns the license for the Calvin Klein women's apparel, dresses, outerwear, performance and cold weather businesses, lower-priced lines sold primarily at department stores. (In February PVH and G-III brokered a similar deal for the Tommy Hilfiger brand.)

In another twist, Mr. Calvin Klein, the brand's founder, has been particularly vocal in the past few months, poking holes in the business model that made him a multi-millionaire. "The really smart retailers — Europeans like Zara, Asians like Uniqlo — they're not using the word luxury,” he recently said. “But I can tell you, I know denim really well, and the same denim that Uniqlo uses is $1,000 in a designer store on 57th Street.”

Klein sold his namesake company in 2003 to PVH, then known as Phillips-Van Heusen, for $400 million in cash, as well as $30 million in stock and up to $300 million in royalties “linked to revenues over the next 15 years,” according to a 2002 report by The New York Times. Klein and his business partner, Barry Schwartz, retired upon the acquisition, although Costa and Zucchelli were their hires. Simons’ modern-minimalist approach appears well-suited to the world Klein first envisioned in 1968, when he introduced his first range of smart outerwear. But Simons will also be the first designer to manage the brand without a direct link to its founder.

Of course, just how far PVH — not particularly well-versed in the ways of high fashion, compared to European conglomerates like LVMH and Kering — will go to transform the Calvin Klein business under new creative leadership remains to be seen. "As Calvin Klein looks to grow the brand to $10 billion in global retail sales, this new leadership is intended to further strengthen the brand’s premium positioning worldwide and pave the way for future long-term global growth," the company said in a statement.

But one thing's for sure: Simons’ runway debut — for the Fall 2017 season — will no doubt be the most anticipated show of New York Fashion Week.


@Copeland he left Dior in October, and as the article says presumably was restricted by a non-compete until now
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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby Copeland » Tue Aug 02, 2016 1:19 pm

But why would he go to a dead 90's American label when he was at Dior.
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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby bels » Tue Aug 02, 2016 2:23 pm

Apparently he gets FULL creative control at CK, wheras at Dior there were parts of the brand (I guess advertising, branding, etc) that he didn't control.

@rams I think you're wrong, Raf and Jlaw are besties:

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(pic i think predates raf at dior)
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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby can- » Wed Aug 03, 2016 12:43 am

i think theres more overlap between ckc and raf than you might immediately think. weird lux synthetic fabrics, structured garments, and similar shapes.

i LOVE ckc so hopefully this is cute.
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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby bels » Wed Aug 03, 2016 5:44 am

You love anything you can get for 70% off in XXL
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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby rublev » Wed Aug 03, 2016 12:45 pm

Spoiler:
Image

Image

which one? kinda want the waves but also...not sure. stripes are nice too. also these might be horrible.
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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby nevergreen » Fri Aug 05, 2016 12:34 am

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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby bels » Fri Aug 05, 2016 10:33 am

http://www.theindustrylondon.com/patric ... -clothing/

Sell your water resistant made in England harringtons on eBay Patrick. Go on. See if I care.

Approaching peak bela here.
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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby Copeland » Fri Aug 05, 2016 2:42 pm

blatant pandering but is wearing a big piece of leather, weird? Sneakers, dress shoes, leather jackets. From a non-vegan/animal rights perspective, still seems weird. Flyknits are more comfortable than any leather sneaker, tech jackets are more practical than leather outerwear. Outside of tradition, leather seems a strange material to fetishize.

Edit: That's true, leather ages unlike any other fabric, but that's also a little weird as the satisfaction is out of owning something living.
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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby adiabatic » Fri Aug 05, 2016 7:15 pm

Copeland wrote:leather


Unhelpful but relevant: Saturday Night Live, “The Leather Man”
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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby fun_yunchables » Fri Aug 05, 2016 7:22 pm

I disagree with that statement, there is nothing "weird" about deriving satisfaction from how some objects age.

"Weird" implies some sort of absolute cultural norm, which I think is a pretty destructive perspective--I'd much rather use something akin to "different." Allow me to explain:
Aging objects is something that is cherished in many cultures (even some western ones). The very idea of impermanence is central to Zen Buddhism, and arises in an object context through the philosophy of "sabi," which I'm sure many people are familiar with (the sabi half of wabi-sabi). It is not so much the object itself that is cherished as so much how the object changes with age, it is a perfect reminder of the ephemeral quality of life that Zen Buddhism embraces. Even materials other than leather are very much cherished. Jade, for example. The value of jade (also known as a "living" stone) is partially due to because of how it changes color over time. Cast iron, ceramic, paper, wood, brass, silver, gold-- these are all materials that are valuable to people because of how they age. Aging objects tell rich and illustrious stories.

As I understand, the idea of an aging object is particularly strange for you. I think some difference in opinion arises from a more fundamental perspective about impermanence, so I accept that the satisfaction of seeing something age is different. I, however, am not a fan of the language used to describe that feeling! I don't mean this as an attack in any way but I just don't like how that phrasing comes about.
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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby adiabatic » Fri Aug 05, 2016 7:46 pm

Copeland wrote:blatant pandering but is wearing a big piece of leather, weird?
[…]
Edit: That's true, leather ages unlike any other fabric, but that's also a little weird as the satisfaction is out of owning something living.

Off the top of my head:
  • A leather jacket isn’t any more living than a cotton shirt or a piece of paper.
  • There are many reasons for a given person to like a particular item made out of leather; “it was once part of an animal” doesn’t strike me as a particularly compelling reason to like a particular item (out of all the possible reasons one could like an item). Undoubtedly there’s at least one person on the planet who specifically enjoys wearing things made from the skins of dead animals, but I’d bet they’re a tiny minority of all people who like at least one thing made out of leather.

For example, I liked one of my father’s leather jackets back in the day; it was warm, was nicely hefty, and I liked the styling. That it came from cows didn’t make me like it either more or less; “it comes from animals” doesn’t matter to me.
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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby Copeland » Sat Aug 06, 2016 12:28 pm

Instead of "weird," I should've used "strange" to erase the negative/normative connotation. I see the satisfaction with owning leather, I like the patina on my wallet and that CPs mold themselves to my feet. The strangeness simply comes from having never reflected on how different leather is from other materials and having always accepted its use as a fashion norm. It's been used to make clothing for all of human civilization, but out of what's available now, leather rarely seems to be the most practical or effective material, in particular for sneakers and outerwear. Not considering its luxury status, there seems to be little reason to own leather unless for purely aesthetic reasons and considering that it's expensive. And again, owning leather for its cultural status or associated craftsmanship is understandable, I get that it's nice, even though I'm not into the subcultures of goodyear welts, full-grain, cordovan, etc. There's a lot of knowledge and discernment for leather, but I've honestly never found any of it to matter or make any practical difference in my experience; e.g. older season RO uses shitty leather, so and so dress shoe uses corrected grain instead of full grain, etc. This is separate from veganism/animal cruelty as I still like my wool sweaters and coats.

This is all highly biased and probably without a point, but I basically realized that I default to flyknits more often and not, and that vegan ramones have been the only "baller" sneaker I've worn consistently out of the box cuz I like waxed canvas better than the leather version. Strongly thinking of never copping leather sneakers again as I hate breaking in stuff on my feet and they're never going to be as comfortable as flyknits. I used to think leather jackets are awesome but now I don't see the point of getting one having owned Veilance/tech stuff.
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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby Morlin » Sat Aug 06, 2016 11:05 pm

Is there a word for jeans with a self edge that's nearly the same color as the outside? Like most black jeans (https://i.s-jcrew.com/is/image/jcrew/E0805_DM1084_m?$pdp_fs418_3x_zoom$) but with blue washes etc
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I think that it is not. Cowichan, etc., If you prefer a thick knit, how about you? It is cool there is atmosphere!
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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby bleeker » Sat Aug 06, 2016 11:46 pm

@morlin
3sixteen uses a fabric they call "shadow selvedge" for different cuts of their jeans. It has a black weft and indigo warp so it's dark on both sides of the fabric. Supposedly it fades to a dark blue over time... I don't know much else though.
Image
http://www.3sixteen.com/collections/den ... selvedge-1
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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby yourdad » Mon Aug 08, 2016 2:22 am

Shadow selvedge fades to a fairly bright blue in comparison to the rest of the denim, almost an electric blue. Definitely one of the key reasons a lot of people buy them, myself included. The contrast after a while looks really nice.

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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby pirxthepilot » Mon Aug 08, 2016 5:03 am

...
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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby bels » Mon Aug 08, 2016 8:31 am

What's the matter now pirx. Do you not want it getting out that you like e tautz?
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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby Bobbin.Threadbare » Mon Aug 08, 2016 11:43 am

bels wrote:http://www.theindustrylondon.com/patrick-grant-sets-ebay-store-community-clothing/

Sell your water resistant made in England harringtons on eBay Patrick. Go on. See if I care.

Approaching peak bela here.


must be getting a free ride from Ebay/Paypal for this - Ebay fees and a terrible imbalance of power between buyer/seller on the platform make it a really silly place to direct sell from as a brand.
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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby adiabatic » Mon Aug 08, 2016 4:56 pm

I’ve come to appreciate mid-2010s slim-fit shorts in modern fabrics, but this floor vent I’m standing over would cool me much more effectively if I were wearing my early-2000s shorts with wide leg openings
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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby rublev » Mon Aug 08, 2016 6:44 pm

Image

doing the round on the internet but barneys selling black flag tees for $265

Crafted of black brushed Japanese cotton-cashmere jersey, R13's T-shirt is printed at front with white "Black Flag" lettering and graphics and styled at sides with decorative elongated zippers.

Crewneck, decorative zippers at sides
Pulls over
Available in Black/Red
95% cotton, 5% cashmere
Hand wash
Imported


additionally... someone tell me about licence / copyright law? can a clothing brand print stuff like this no questions asked or would they have to speak to henry rollins?
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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby jujumaster » Mon Aug 08, 2016 7:16 pm

This current trend for ridiculously priced vintage band tees needs to fuck right off.
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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby CheerUpBrokeBoy » Tue Aug 09, 2016 2:21 am

vintage rock tees were the logical next step for the supreme/FoG crowd – "cool" and "edgy" while still aesthetically bland, can be resold for 15x retail, wear and tear accepted because it makes it more "authentic"

my friend wants to buy some more on the justification that he can "resell them for more after a while"???? like what? you've been into fashion since before jerry lorenzo was poppin, do you not see that this is a trend

i wonder how punk/metal fans feel seeing lil yachty fans wearing the iron maiden shirts they were shoved into lockers for wearing back in 1985

e: @ramseames yeah that's what i'm saying, 2 different groups. tryna throw a shot abt how none of these memeteens w 30yo tshirts on do it for the love of the band
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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby ramseames » Tue Aug 09, 2016 2:36 am

there's a moment in travis scott's nardwuar interview where he gets given this album



and he knows of it because he wore a tee with it on it in one of his videos

and then when asked about metal in general says "I never really got into it because it was super hard to listen to"

was on the nomad site looking at new bird on the weekend and saw they got a couple dozen of those lorenzo tees in and sold through them all, presumably for $1-300 each

on the other hand I saw maiden alone a few months ago and enjoyed myself but sorta in spite of the crowd, so I don't really feel like metal culture being ransacked by kids who own raf adidas is that much of a tragedy
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Re: random fashion jersey bibs

Postby trasparenti » Tue Aug 09, 2016 10:18 pm

I was in July's Men's Non-no!

sorry for awful picture but here's a little blurry me.
Image

I'm returning to America soon sadly but I'll try to get a bunch of magazine scans once I return.

also cuz I haven't been on in a little while... no cop begins now. one of the reasons I'm not too miserable about not staying here longer is because I can and will spend every cent I make and then some. If I had iron willpower I could do it but the combination of all the imports and exclusive items, original brands, and one of the liveliest secondhand markets in the world makes for a dangerous combo. I'll be back sooner or later though
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Last edited by trasparenti on Wed Aug 10, 2016 10:14 am, edited 1 time in total.
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