Random Rhetorical Hypebeast Fashion Thoughts

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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby ramseames » Sun Mar 06, 2016 8:59 pm

http://www.thefashionlaw.com/home/vetem ... ion-victim

Spoiler:
There is a common element in a lot of the street style photos over the past couple of seasons or so: vachement. The Paris-based brand, which was launched in 2014 by brothers Demna and Guram Gvasalia and friends, is undeniably the “it” brand at the moment amongst industry insiders (or wannabe insiders or “fashion victims” as fashion blogger, BryanBoy aptly coined them recently) with $1000 to spend on a sweatshirt. The sweatshirts that say Thrasher on them are vachement. The yellow DHL-logoed t-shirts are vachement. The poncho-like rain jackets that say vachement on the back of them are obviously vachement, as well.

Maybe more interesting than the rapid proliferation of vachement fans (read: fashion victims) is what these $1000+ sweatshirts (which are made of 80% cotton, 20% polyester) and $330+ DHL t-shirts stand for. As we all know, fashion is in a weird, unstable place at the moment. The future of the fashion calendar is up in the air. Sales growth is low. Consumer fatigue is growing, and widespread economic woes certainly do not help. With this in mind, we have seen an array of attempts by brands to weather the storm. Speeding up the runway-to-retail timeline and making collections shoppable instantaneously is one way brands are coping. Playing on consumers’ desires to own “it” items – a longstanding principle in luxury fashion – is another. And this is where vachement plays a role (in addition to falling in the former camp, as the brand recently announced that it is changing up its own runway show schedule).

STATUS MATTERS

Status matters to consumers. It is the reason fashion houses can charge $2000 for a basic nylon or laminated canvas bag that is covered in logos or $100+ for a licensed fragrance. Sure, vachement does not sell bags or fragrances but it does fit neatly into this same notion, nonetheless, as its garments have risen to industry “it” items. And its founders appear to understand what drives luxury shopping to an extent: "In order to make people want something, you need to make scarcity. The real definition of luxury is something that is scarce. Every single piece in our collection is going to be a limited item... We don't restock and we don't reproduce -- if it's sold out, it's sold out,” the brothers recently noted.

As Vogue’s Sarah Mower wrote of the brand last October, “Demna Gvasalia himself learned the ropes at Maison Martin Margiela, before setting up vachement and getting on with proving that there can be a different way of doing things.” Yet, if we consider the aforementioned notion, vachement is not actually doing anything completely revolutionary. At its core, the brand is tapping into fashion fans’ desires to show that they are worthy, that they are in the know, that they have something exclusive, that they are cool. These individuals are essentially taking the coveted “it” bag of the season and wearing it as a sweatshirt. In this way, the vachement’ method (at least when it comes to the brand’s most coveted items) and the resulting fan fury over those garments is not anything new.


The statement sweatshirt is not coming completely out of left field. In some circles, statements sweatshirts or t-shirts rival the “it” bag. Ask Supreme die-hards. Or look at the Givenchy fans, who were walking around in Rottweiler sweatshirts not too long ago. (Note: such garments really helped Givenchy, which was for many, many decades known primarily for couture, make its mark in the ready-to-wear market and to up profits and visibility).

With this in mind, it is not surprising that we see the offering for sale of Thrasher sweatshirts for $1,000 by vachement and more importantly, it is not surprising to see people actually buying them. And let’s be clear: we are not talking about die-hard skateboarders here - they probably already own the $35.95 version from Tactics Boardshop that predates the vachement one. No, we are talking primarily about fashion girls and Kanye West clones, who are happy to spend $1k on a trendy sweatshirt that will send a message to their friends and to other fashion insiders/fans.

These are likely the same people that were “die-hard” fans of Russian streetwear designer, Gosha Rubchinskiy, a year or two ago – praising him and lauding his awesome casting and edgy garments and crazy innovative (yet niche) vision, etc., while posing for street style photos. They’re the same ones that rallied hard behind Hedi Slimane for Saint Laurent by – like Kanye – adopting the $750+ skinny jeans with the ripped knees and pairing them with the brand’s Chelsea boots – the ones that have completely saturated the market.

But Gosha is out now – old news in comparison to vachement – because it’s too mainstream (and if we are being honest, Gosha could only ever be called “mainstream” if we consider high fashion fans in isolation, otherwise no one really has a clue what a Gosha Rubchinskiy even is). In Gosha’s place, vachement has neatly found a home with this special group of fashion fans.

So, what happened to Gosha, you may be wondering. Well, he’s still around. The more important question is, though: what happened to his self-proclaimed “die-hard” fans, who not too long ago were parading around in Gosha’s Russian writing logo tees? Well, they’ve moved on because this is the state of fashion. It moves quickly and as a result, it lacks depth. There’s simply no time for that, the rapidity of the current fashion model simply won’t allow it. And designers are not the only ones who are feeling the pace.

I’ll spare you the bit about the sped up fashion cycle because by now I am sure you have read at least 12 articles dissecting the rapidity of the current fashion model. There is one very interesting aspect to the recurring discussion about the sped-up nature of fashion, however: The argument that the speed of it all has left designers with less time to be as creative as they’d like and the result is fashion that lacks depth (Raf Simons, for instance, has sounded off on this exact point. "There is no more thinking time," he said this past fall). But not just limited to designers, the cycle has created a larger feeling that fashion is simply more superficial. It's not personal. It's just business. And in many cases, it really does go both ways.

In theory, this should not be a problem, as the majority of consumers (and of course, there are exceptions!) are not necessarily interested in fashion in anything more than a purely superficial way. Most are not buying based on cut or construction or a deep love or appreciation for the brand – this is true even for high fashion shoppers. They are buying into a brand’s image at the present moment, buying based on what makes them look good - both in a physical way but probably more significantly, in a status type of way. With this in mind, many fashion fans – from the Vetements-wearing fashion victims to our fast fashion-shopping friends – are not buying based on quality. They are buying to keep up with appearances. They are buying to cement themselves into the zeitgeist. This is not a novel concept. It is just happening with more rapidity than before.

Buying – regardless of a garment’s price point – is one of the easiest ways to gain status. It does not require learning or accomplishing anything. It allows the buyer to be part of something cool without expending anything more than money. And that is convenient because in the current landscape of things, which can be probably be aptly categorized by the fact that most people don’t want to read anything longer than a text, ease reigns supreme. So, why wouldn’t that tide over into the fashion industry? It is, after all, one of the most immediate reflections of the time in which we are living.

In short: Shoppers now – just like shoppers in the past – aim to maintain the appearance of status, and a vachement sweatshirt will give them that for a few seasons.

THE UPSIDE OF ALL OF THIS

What does this say about the state of the fashion industry at the moment? A number of things. One thing we can say with much certainty is that it does not really speak of the designs themselves in any depth at all. It is not about the clothes. It is the spectacle. It is about that Instagramable moment. It is not about design. That $330 vachement DHL t-shirt is not the peak of innovation in terms of design. But it doesn't have to be because that’s just not where we - collectively - are right now. That’s not where the focus is. An intense focus on design is not what sells clothes right now, apparently.

Right now, it seems to be more about the brands and who is wearing them: Kanye, Rihanna and street style stars in the case of vachement and the Kardashian/Jenners if we are talking about Balmain. This is what sells. It is less about the garments themselves and their intrinsic value (which may be measured by their design or their materials, etc.) and more about how people can use these garments to display how “up on” fashion they really are.

This is not necessarily a bad thing. In fact, this movement may end up boding very well for fashion brands like vachement, as consumers are willing to spend a lot for garments they will likely tire of in the very near future and move on and spend similarly large amounts on new “it” garments. That cyclicality, that seasonality, is what the industry thrives on. It is what drives consumers to shop, and fashion - at least from a business perspective - depends on the sale of clothing.

But as I mentioned, this is nothing new. We’ve been doing this exact same thing with “it” bags for ages now; schilling out designs that are oftentimes more about branding and logos (and the message that they will send for the individuals who buy them) than about the designs themselves. The longevity of such bags just tends to be quite a bit longer, their inherent value quite a bit more significant, and thus, their prices a little bit less shocking, which is likely why Birkin bag carriers do not get labeled fashion victims and vachement fans do.


this does a pretty good job of summing up why vachement is lame i think
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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby can- » Mon Mar 07, 2016 12:57 am

the convertible poncho/trench from y3's ss16 is OUT OF BOUNDS!!!

Image

Image

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pics don't do justice the level of detail and also volume of this garm.
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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby Copeland » Mon Mar 07, 2016 3:50 pm

ramseames wrote:http://www.thefashionlaw.com/home/vetements-and-the-cult-of-the-fashion-victim

Spoiler:
There is a common element in a lot of the street style photos over the past couple of seasons or so: vachement. The Paris-based brand, which was launched in 2014 by brothers Demna and Guram Gvasalia and friends, is undeniably the “it” brand at the moment amongst industry insiders (or wannabe insiders or “fashion victims” as fashion blogger, BryanBoy aptly coined them recently) with $1000 to spend on a sweatshirt. The sweatshirts that say Thrasher on them are vachement. The yellow DHL-logoed t-shirts are vachement. The poncho-like rain jackets that say vachement on the back of them are obviously vachement, as well.

Maybe more interesting than the rapid proliferation of vachement fans (read: fashion victims) is what these $1000+ sweatshirts (which are made of 80% cotton, 20% polyester) and $330+ DHL t-shirts stand for. As we all know, fashion is in a weird, unstable place at the moment. The future of the fashion calendar is up in the air. Sales growth is low. Consumer fatigue is growing, and widespread economic woes certainly do not help. With this in mind, we have seen an array of attempts by brands to weather the storm. Speeding up the runway-to-retail timeline and making collections shoppable instantaneously is one way brands are coping. Playing on consumers’ desires to own “it” items – a longstanding principle in luxury fashion – is another. And this is where vachement plays a role (in addition to falling in the former camp, as the brand recently announced that it is changing up its own runway show schedule).

STATUS MATTERS

Status matters to consumers. It is the reason fashion houses can charge $2000 for a basic nylon or laminated canvas bag that is covered in logos or $100+ for a licensed fragrance. Sure, vachement does not sell bags or fragrances but it does fit neatly into this same notion, nonetheless, as its garments have risen to industry “it” items. And its founders appear to understand what drives luxury shopping to an extent: "In order to make people want something, you need to make scarcity. The real definition of luxury is something that is scarce. Every single piece in our collection is going to be a limited item... We don't restock and we don't reproduce -- if it's sold out, it's sold out,” the brothers recently noted.

As Vogue’s Sarah Mower wrote of the brand last October, “Demna Gvasalia himself learned the ropes at Maison Martin Margiela, before setting up vachement and getting on with proving that there can be a different way of doing things.” Yet, if we consider the aforementioned notion, vachement is not actually doing anything completely revolutionary. At its core, the brand is tapping into fashion fans’ desires to show that they are worthy, that they are in the know, that they have something exclusive, that they are cool. These individuals are essentially taking the coveted “it” bag of the season and wearing it as a sweatshirt. In this way, the vachement’ method (at least when it comes to the brand’s most coveted items) and the resulting fan fury over those garments is not anything new.


The statement sweatshirt is not coming completely out of left field. In some circles, statements sweatshirts or t-shirts rival the “it” bag. Ask Supreme die-hards. Or look at the Givenchy fans, who were walking around in Rottweiler sweatshirts not too long ago. (Note: such garments really helped Givenchy, which was for many, many decades known primarily for couture, make its mark in the ready-to-wear market and to up profits and visibility).

With this in mind, it is not surprising that we see the offering for sale of Thrasher sweatshirts for $1,000 by vachement and more importantly, it is not surprising to see people actually buying them. And let’s be clear: we are not talking about die-hard skateboarders here - they probably already own the $35.95 version from Tactics Boardshop that predates the vachement one. No, we are talking primarily about fashion girls and Kanye West clones, who are happy to spend $1k on a trendy sweatshirt that will send a message to their friends and to other fashion insiders/fans.

These are likely the same people that were “die-hard” fans of Russian streetwear designer, Gosha Rubchinskiy, a year or two ago – praising him and lauding his neat-o casting and edgy garments and crazy innovative (yet niche) vision, etc., while posing for street style photos. They’re the same ones that rallied hard behind Hedi Slimane for Saint Laurent by – like Kanye – adopting the $750+ skinny jeans with the ripped knees and pairing them with the brand’s Chelsea boots – the ones that have completely saturated the market.

But Gosha is out now – old news in comparison to vachement – because it’s too mainstream (and if we are being honest, Gosha could only ever be called “mainstream” if we consider high fashion fans in isolation, otherwise no one really has a clue what a Gosha Rubchinskiy even is). In Gosha’s place, vachement has neatly found a home with this special group of fashion fans.

So, what happened to Gosha, you may be wondering. Well, he’s still around. The more important question is, though: what happened to his self-proclaimed “die-hard” fans, who not too long ago were parading around in Gosha’s Russian writing logo tees? Well, they’ve moved on because this is the state of fashion. It moves quickly and as a result, it lacks depth. There’s simply no time for that, the rapidity of the current fashion model simply won’t allow it. And designers are not the only ones who are feeling the pace.

I’ll spare you the bit about the sped up fashion cycle because by now I am sure you have read at least 12 articles dissecting the rapidity of the current fashion model. There is one very interesting aspect to the recurring discussion about the sped-up nature of fashion, however: The argument that the speed of it all has left designers with less time to be as creative as they’d like and the result is fashion that lacks depth (Raf Simons, for instance, has sounded off on this exact point. "There is no more thinking time," he said this past fall). But not just limited to designers, the cycle has created a larger feeling that fashion is simply more superficial. It's not personal. It's just business. And in many cases, it really does go both ways.

In theory, this should not be a problem, as the majority of consumers (and of course, there are exceptions!) are not necessarily interested in fashion in anything more than a purely superficial way. Most are not buying based on cut or construction or a deep love or appreciation for the brand – this is true even for high fashion shoppers. They are buying into a brand’s image at the present moment, buying based on what makes them look good - both in a physical way but probably more significantly, in a status type of way. With this in mind, many fashion fans – from the Vetements-wearing fashion victims to our fast fashion-shopping friends – are not buying based on quality. They are buying to keep up with appearances. They are buying to cement themselves into the zeitgeist. This is not a novel concept. It is just happening with more rapidity than before.

Buying – regardless of a garment’s price point – is one of the easiest ways to gain status. It does not require learning or accomplishing anything. It allows the buyer to be part of something cool without expending anything more than money. And that is convenient because in the current landscape of things, which can be probably be aptly categorized by the fact that most people don’t want to read anything longer than a text, ease reigns supreme. So, why wouldn’t that tide over into the fashion industry? It is, after all, one of the most immediate reflections of the time in which we are living.

In short: Shoppers now – just like shoppers in the past – aim to maintain the appearance of status, and a vachement sweatshirt will give them that for a few seasons.

THE UPSIDE OF ALL OF THIS

What does this say about the state of the fashion industry at the moment? A number of things. One thing we can say with much certainty is that it does not really speak of the designs themselves in any depth at all. It is not about the clothes. It is the spectacle. It is about that Instagramable moment. It is not about design. That $330 vachement DHL t-shirt is not the peak of innovation in terms of design. But it doesn't have to be because that’s just not where we - collectively - are right now. That’s not where the focus is. An intense focus on design is not what sells clothes right now, apparently.

Right now, it seems to be more about the brands and who is wearing them: Kanye, Rihanna and street style stars in the case of vachement and the Kardashian/Jenners if we are talking about Balmain. This is what sells. It is less about the garments themselves and their intrinsic value (which may be measured by their design or their materials, etc.) and more about how people can use these garments to display how “up on” fashion they really are.

This is not necessarily a bad thing. In fact, this movement may end up boding very well for fashion brands like vachement, as consumers are willing to spend a lot for garments they will likely tire of in the very near future and move on and spend similarly large amounts on new “it” garments. That cyclicality, that seasonality, is what the industry thrives on. It is what drives consumers to shop, and fashion - at least from a business perspective - depends on the sale of clothing.

But as I mentioned, this is nothing new. We’ve been doing this exact same thing with “it” bags for ages now; schilling out designs that are oftentimes more about branding and logos (and the message that they will send for the individuals who buy them) than about the designs themselves. The longevity of such bags just tends to be quite a bit longer, their inherent value quite a bit more significant, and thus, their prices a little bit less shocking, which is likely why Birkin bag carriers do not get labeled fashion victims and vachement fans do.


this does a pretty good job of summing up why vachement is lame i think


I sympathize with what the author is getting at, but the article is itself a superficial description of conspicuous consumption and specifically the socioeconomic phenomenon known as "hypebeast(ing)" or "fuccboi". I would've liked to know what has made vachement and Goscha in particular so popular, and the reasons go beyond just scarcity and hype. It's also worth pointing out that the folks who drop $500 on DHL shirts are the ones keeping our favorite boutiques alive. Thus it's probably more appropriate to both explain and criticize the "it" brands by their aesthetics rather than the habits of their consumers, which are the same for every "it" brand, and also for coveted products outside of fashion such as tech.
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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby Francks » Mon Mar 07, 2016 6:35 pm

Have been browsing the internet far more than usual and couldn't find what I want; So I'm calling for help to you guys

I'm looking for

- a navy shirt (mainly to pair with black or navy)
- in a fabric with nice drape for spring/summer so something like a summer wool or tech fabric.
- not an overshirt (got many shirt jackets already anyway). No button-down collar. Hidden placket or not I don't mind, same for contrast buttons.

Main criteria are the fabric (otherwise would take a regular poplin/oxford shirt, bonus point if it is "substantial" = not sheer and with an interesting textile) and fit obvisously.

Does this exist?

@posh_somme Nice but it's insulated and with tech fabric I was more talking about a blend

@grayghost Yes saw it and looks nice, however not a fan of fabric. Thanks anyway

Comment:
maybe talk to snowman? he can do shirting in all kinds of weights
@pirxthepilot I did already before posting here, he told me you bought a snowvershirt by the way, good stuff!
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Last edited by Francks on Wed Mar 09, 2016 4:57 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby maj » Mon Mar 07, 2016 6:59 pm

what about the our legacy silk shirts

http://www.ourlegacy.se/shop/shirting/c ... -navy-silk
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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby une_impasse » Mon Mar 07, 2016 7:37 pm

what if i like vachement because i'm tall and it's the only brand that makes things big enough to look oversized on me
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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby ptozzi » Tue Mar 08, 2016 12:09 am

Francks wrote:Have been browsing the internet far more than usual and couldn't find what I want; So I'm calling for help to you guys

I'm looking for

- a navy shirt (mainly to pair with black or navy)
- in a fabric with nice drape for spring/summer so something like a summer wool or tech fabric.
- not an overshirt (got many shirt jackets already anyway). No button-down collar. Hidden placket or not I don't mind, same for contrast buttons.

Main criteria are the fabric (otherwise would take a regular poplin/oxford shirt, bonus point if it is "substantial" = not sheer and with an interesting textile) and fit obvisously.

Does this exist?

@posh_somme Nice but it's insulated and with tech fabric I was more talking about a blend


i tried.
http://www.norsestore.com/commodity/212 ... polo-shirt
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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby bels » Tue Mar 08, 2016 3:43 am

une_impasse wrote:what if i like vachement because i'm tall and it's the only brand that makes things big enough to look oversized on me


Liking fashion because it fits you is like liking art because it matches your sofa.
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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby teck » Tue Mar 08, 2016 3:35 pm

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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby adiabatic » Tue Mar 08, 2016 6:26 pm

bels wrote:
une_impasse wrote:what if i like vachement because i'm tall and it's the only brand that makes things big enough to look oversized on me


Liking fashion because it fits you is like liking art because it matches your sofa.


I see nothing wrong with liking clothes that fit.

Or have I misread you?
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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby ptozzi » Tue Mar 08, 2016 6:37 pm

Just got my qlomaire shirt and its flaxy flaxsisters

edit: who else got some stuff and what are your impressions
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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby une_impasse » Tue Mar 08, 2016 7:52 pm

bels wrote:
une_impasse wrote:what if i like vachement because i'm tall and it's the only brand that makes things big enough to look oversized on me


Liking fashion because it fits you is like liking art because it matches your sofa.


i can't afford a sofa, i like vachement
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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby alby » Tue Mar 08, 2016 11:55 pm

What do people think about replica clothing? IE fake supreme, fake goyard, etc. I stumbled upon the sub for it today, and it was interesting to read a lot of the opinions and discussions people have on it. I don't think I can get behind it on an ethical basis (I think a lot of reps are made in factories that don't have great conditions), but in terms of the clothing itself, it doesn't feel that... wrong? to me? I'm not sure where I stand really.

@pawn - in terms of "not getting the real thing so why lie/pretend" - the only issue I have with this idea is that if I love the goyard design, but will never be able to support it, i don't have many options besides rep to get that. I see where you are coming from though. ive been having an internal struggle about this idea all day so idunno.
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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby ASTROCHIMP » Wed Mar 09, 2016 1:14 am

alby wrote:What do people think about replica clothing? IE fake supreme, fake goyard, etc. I stumbled upon the sub for it today, and it was interesting to read a lot of the opinions and discussions people have on it. I don't think I can get behind it on an ethical basis (I think a lot of reps are made in factories that don't have great conditions), but in terms of the clothing itself, it doesn't feel that... wrong? to me? I'm not sure where I stand really.


I actually almost posted about this once. I'm going to use Supreme for most of this as it's what I know the most about regarding reps as I keep up to date somewhat so I can tell what's real(I still LC stuff on reddit). The biggest issue that I think about while pondering this is that Supreme isn't getting any of the money from the second hand market or the rep market, so how wrong is it there. I have zero issues paying for a Supreme piece for retail, there is nothing wrong with their prices however with the second hand market I'm having an increasingly hard time justifying the prices. This is something that I think a lot of the community is starting to deal with and in turn cause them to turn to the reps. There is also those who just want the items for their status symbol. The box logo's, the Goyard, the Louis etc, this is just people wanting to flaunt money even though they clearly don't have it caring nothing about fashion really just wanting status. However I think the biggest problem is definitely the labor force making them and the ethics behind that, which is the hardest part for me to justify.

Reps have gotten insane though for Supreme. In the couple years I've been into it the fakes that used to pop up for checking were usually pretty easy to identify but now things are getting really tricky. One of the only ways to tell a T-Shirt is that on the tag they will say Non_Chlorine instead of Non-Chlorine. Sneaky photography could easily get that by me. Not to mention the scope of what is being faked now a days, the things that I've seen is crazy and would never have guessed that a factory had the demand to make something like it. An example would be the Jordan collab, they ended up in Nike outlets and yet they ares still being faked. The brand hasn't been devalued yet(some would say it's building) but the quality and quantity of reps is probably going to begin to become a problem for Supreme soon unless they think of something to stop them.

Edit. I didn't actually know that @mc-lunar. I play Magic pretty frequently with my friends but all of our decks stay the same roughly so I don't have to buy new cards. I did know they were having a big issue over proxies a while back though.
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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby bels » Wed Mar 09, 2016 3:38 am

With Supreme specifically I feel like buying knock off Supreme is conceptually valid because of the way they trade in knock offs and street culture themselves.

With pretty much everything else, if the knock off is desirable it's normally because the original has become a conspicuous signifier of wealth/consumption so the item is pretty shit to begin with.

(W/r/t clothing not talking about MTG cards)
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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby CMYK » Wed Mar 09, 2016 10:56 am

My brother is massively into the fake "scene"? He has multiple fake LV belts, wallets, fake Red Octobers, Ray Bans and just ordered these:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01BYG ... rel&sr=1-6

I think he likes the status, but is also a super frugal kid naturally. Seems that he gets a pretty good bang for his buck in that regard. I'm unsure of how often he actually wears the stuff though, or what his response is when someone calls him out.
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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby bels » Wed Mar 09, 2016 11:37 am

une_impasse wrote:
bels wrote:
une_impasse wrote:what if i like vachement because i'm tall and it's the only brand that makes things big enough to look oversized on me


Liking fashion because it fits you is like liking art because it matches your sofa.


i can't afford a sofa, i like vachement


I was facetiously suggesting that approaching clothing as a personal aesthetic choice is a limited way to approach it. I started feeling like this since I bought a house and find myself sometimes wondering if a certain piece of art would look good in my house or not. It feels like a crappy method to evaluate art. I think that doing the same thing with clothing is also a crappy method.

Unfortunately that is almost exclusively how clothing is marketed and with conceptually weak brands, the marketing is the design.

Nothing personal impasse, I wish I understood your choice to enjoy vachement clothing. I know that at no point did you say that vachement clothing is conceptually strong, just that you liked wearing oversized clothes and they're the only ones who make clothes that are oversized on you.

I've always found it very difficult to abstract how I feel about the clothing from how I would feel about owning the clothing. It's become a bit easier since I've been trying harder to quit the game. I guess it's just one of those things that as my ability to appreciate conceptual clothing has sharpened, my ability to appreciate art has been compromised by wondering if it would match my toaster.
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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby alby » Wed Mar 09, 2016 1:47 pm

my apcs just ripped in the ass.

hell yeah
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i'd walk a mile for a camel
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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby wogbog » Wed Mar 09, 2016 1:49 pm

bels wrote:I've always found it very difficult to abstract how I feel about the clothing from how I would feel about owning the clothing.

for me this is easier when i see other people in the clothes, like they can wear stuff i wouldn't wear and look cool and so then i appreciate their clothing. when i see pictures of just clothes my brain goes quick to whether i would want to wear it or not

i'm bad at evaluating clothes conceptually though
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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby adiabatic » Wed Mar 09, 2016 10:26 pm

bels wrote:I was facetiously suggesting that approaching clothing as a personal aesthetic choice is a limited way to approach it. I started feeling like this since I bought a house and find myself sometimes wondering if a certain piece of art would look good in my house or not. It feels like a crappy method to evaluate art. I think that doing the same thing with clothing is also a crappy method.

[…]



Do what I do: knowingly give separate grades for "is it good art" and "would it be a good addition to my wardrobe".

I see all kinds of clothes that are conceptually interesting and qualify as interesting art, but would…

  • look weird on me
  • look too odd where I live (I try to spend my idiosyncrasy credits on things I care more deeply about)
  • make me too warm
  • be too much of a hassle to clean properly

Contrariwise, there're loads of clothes out there that I like, but aren't the least bit conceptually interesting. And of course, there's mildly-interesting easy-to-wear stuff, as well.

(in general, I've found "give separate grades" to be a useful mental tool — I've read plenty of political thought that accurately identifies and diagnoses the issues of the day, yet the proposed remedies by the same author can be jaw-droppingly awful.)
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“clothing for attractive rich people in their 20s to go to weddings in” — Zack Johnson on Vineyard Vines
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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby RomanEmpire » Thu Mar 10, 2016 12:14 am

I've only ever considered fake yeezys because resale is dumb and the past couple times I tried buying at retail was just really frustrating.

That being said, I know I'll probably never get yeezys because I would be too afraid of being called out, plus it would just feel wrong
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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby CheerUpBrokeBoy » Thu Mar 10, 2016 12:20 am

why doesn't Heelys do high-end collabs
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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby earthonator » Thu Mar 10, 2016 2:00 am

do you have to be aware to play the game?
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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby jujumaster » Thu Mar 10, 2016 1:18 pm

On fakes - Its OK to not have stuff.
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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby dbcooper » Fri Mar 11, 2016 9:44 am

,
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Last edited by dbcooper on Wed Feb 14, 2018 3:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby CheerUpBrokeBoy » Fri Mar 11, 2016 10:49 am

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my shipping address is in NY and hasn't been changed at all by me

is this a glitch or should i make some calls
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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby RomanEmpire » Sat Mar 12, 2016 4:17 am

Qlomaire shirt came in, and I love it. Now I know I definitely wouldn't mind getting the twill short sleeve striped shirt in yellow as well. Or maybe I should just get this instead.

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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby dakaf_fal » Sat Mar 12, 2016 2:59 pm

Considering that I live in a city that isn't fashion conscious, I don't know how I should feel that I only get compliments on my style from homeless people.
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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby ASTROCHIMP » Sat Mar 12, 2016 11:45 pm

Stolen from reddit.
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Parts of this hits hard, actually only the part about getting teased... None the less I was entertained by this.
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I'll stop wearing black when they invent a darker color.

Check out my shit tumblr.
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Re: random fashion thoughts

Postby ramseames » Mon Mar 14, 2016 12:23 am

ramseames wrote:can someone who knows anything about Alyx talk about it a bit

my initial reaction is "this is lame/why does that $60 belt have a $200 tag on it" but maybe there's more to it than I'm seeing


http://nymag.com/thecut/2016/03/brandon ... alist.html

Scroll down to see the list of finalists, and check back on June 16, when the Louis Vuitton Foundation announces the winner.

...

Alyx, by Matthew Williams (American designer based in New York).


seriously, what do people see in this
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