Page 168 of 215

Re: random fashion thoughts

PostPosted: Mon Mar 14, 2016 5:35 am
by dbcooper
.

Re: random fashion thoughts

PostPosted: Mon Mar 14, 2016 5:45 am
by bels
Isn't 032c that canned Notch project?

Re: random fashion thoughts

PostPosted: Mon Mar 14, 2016 7:05 am
by trasparenti
I handled a Fear of God MA-1 for the first time today while looking for clothes for packages. I know a lot of streetwear dudes really like this brand and there was an editorial in SENSE last month or something, plus Barneys carries it so I figured it had to be pretty nice.

It was this one
Image

It was junk. Thin, wimpy poly shell with a thin poly inner, cheap zippers (the zips were branded FOG which was kinda cool I guess), bizarre slouchy cropped fit, and to top it off, made in China. Lame. For $100 it'd be acceptable. Secondhand the thing was 75,550 yen, or over $660. That's insane, considering that Alpha bombers cost a fraction of that brand new, and you can get a legit nice used MA-1 for the price. There wasn't even any print or embroidery. I dun get it. Between that and that one brand I've been seeing on Hypebeast about an anti-social club or w/e I'm pretty unenthused on current streetwear stuff.

Re: random fashion thoughts

PostPosted: Mon Mar 14, 2016 8:12 am
by can-
whos making white bucks in sz14/51

Re: random fashion thoughts

PostPosted: Mon Mar 14, 2016 8:58 pm
by ramdomthought
there is a lot of joy in denim, wool socks, wool birk knockoffs, a shirt, and most importantly a jersey bib with a hood while lounging on a couch

you should all buy a jersey bib with a hood on it, it's definitely not ultra nerdy

Re: random fashion thoughts

PostPosted: Mon Mar 14, 2016 11:51 pm
by ramdomthought
@alby

Image

Re: random fashion jersey bibs

PostPosted: Tue Mar 15, 2016 9:52 am
by trasparenti
dunno if this'll be of any interest to anyone but found a ten-year old video some Italian store took while visiting the showrooms of UC and Carpe Diem


Re: random fashion jersey bibs

PostPosted: Wed Mar 16, 2016 3:06 am
by CheerUpBrokeBoy
Image

Re: random fashion jersey bibs

PostPosted: Wed Mar 16, 2016 4:56 pm
by fun_yunchables
happy 50th birthday to vans :')

Re: random fashion jersey bibs

PostPosted: Thu Mar 17, 2016 9:33 am
by jrisk
the sunlight came in through my window and caused a glare on my work computer. my coworker said "you know... it kind of looks like a drape..."

Image

Re: random fashion jersey bibs

PostPosted: Thu Mar 17, 2016 10:57 am
by Ques
just found myself on a Chinese style blog???

Image

http://3g.k.sohu.com/t/n122154165?from=singlemessage&isappinstalled=0

me and other "hot foreign men"

dead

Re: random fashion jersey bibs

PostPosted: Thu Mar 17, 2016 12:33 pm
by Julio
^on a similar note

played a weekend festival maybe two weekends ago; beach/mountain type thing. got style snapped or whatever you want to call it while i was zoning out/watching one of the performances (yes i wasn't exactly sober)
Image
l o l

Re: random fashion jersey bibs

PostPosted: Fri Mar 18, 2016 6:07 am
by shyan
Apparent flintstone?

Martin Margiela for Hermes 1999 (found on tumblr) vs Uniqlo Lemaire
Image

Image

Re: random fashion jersey bibs

PostPosted: Fri Mar 18, 2016 10:03 am
by bels
It's called a reference shyan, it's how all art is created. Ask @pirxthepilot for more info.

Re: random fashion jersey bibs

PostPosted: Fri Mar 18, 2016 7:24 pm
by weqe
i always kinda thought people were joking when they said unbranded's buttons pop off :(

Re: random fashion jersey bibs

PostPosted: Fri Mar 18, 2016 8:55 pm
by thecanadiancook
flintstone can come from anywhere
Image
(from my University paper)

Re: random fashion jersey bibs

PostPosted: Sat Mar 19, 2016 12:29 am
by WussWayne
I wonder if there's an intersection between wearing Supreme and scoring Radiohead tickets

Re: random fashion jersey bibs

PostPosted: Sat Mar 19, 2016 12:52 am
by hamburgerlady
Image

also got snapped recently in chicago (although i don't get the bible verse in the corner...)

Re: random fashion jersey bibs

PostPosted: Sun Mar 20, 2016 2:32 am
by ramseames
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/55c2141e-b488 ... z43QD59PqO

Spoiler:
Do you know the best thing we found?” asked Dickon Bowden, vice-president of Dover Street Market. “A picture of Yeltsin wearing a Burberry coat.” We were standing in the new home of Comme des Garçons’ multi-brand store, Dover Street Market (DSM), the Burberry building on London’s Haymarket that was left empty when Burberry moved headquarters in 2007, and is due to open next Saturday. It was still a construction site, but all traces of Burberry, including the clock on the front, had been removed. Radicalism is on its way in.

The tour was led by Adrian Joffe, 62, president of Comme des Garçons (Comme) and DSM, and husband of Rei Kawakubo, 73, who founded the label in 1969. “We are transporting Dover Street here and stretching it out because this space is so much bigger,” said Joffe. The move was prompted by a doubling of the rent on the Mayfair store where DSM first presented its disruptive vision in 2004. “We thought, ‘Dover Street Market: can it leave Dover Street?’ And we said, ‘Yes, why not?’”

Haymarket has been a retail “dead” zone. Opposite is a cinema. Down the road is Her Majesty’s Theatre, the long-term home of The Phantom of the Opera. Up the road is a bar called Tiger Tiger, to be avoided by anyone wanting anything like a civilised drink. The street is a one-way downhill slope, along which traffic hurtles after being liberated from congested Piccadilly Circus. “A lot of people are expressing their doubts or worries that no one shops in Piccadilly, but that’s stupid,” said Joffe. “We’re not worried, are we? No, I’m not worried at all.”

Counterintuitive thinking is part of the Comme mindset. It has a history of opening stores in uncharted retail waters. Comme moved into New York’s Chelsea in 1999 when only a few blue-chip galleries had started to colonise the area. There are DSMs in Tokyo and New York, the latter in the once unfashionable Murray Hill district. And from Saturday, the London original will no longer call Dover Street home.

At more than 31,000 sq ft, an increase of 20,000 sq ft, the new store is their biggest risk yet. “People will find it familiar,” said Joffe as we walked around the ground floor of the listed building. “We don’t want to discombobulate them too much. It took them six years to get used to the other one. It will look different and feel familiar. That’s the idea.”

I know the space well. For years it was where Burberry displayed its product to press and buyers. When its chief executive Christopher Bailey started as creative director, it was here you met him for a chat. The sweeping octagonal staircase that wraps around an elevator still remains. The grand ceiling is intact. Yet the intervention is disorientating.

“The entrance was there,” said Joffe. The previous entrance opened on to a bus stop. It will now be on a side street next to the old staff entrance. “There’ll be some major sculptural things in the window to block the view inside. One of the prerequisites of Westminster Council was that you can see it’s a shop. We’ve taken it to the total limit of possibilities.”

As we walked through the first floor, Joffe listed off some of the brands that will take up occupancy. “Céline. Dior. Comme. Alaïa. JW Anderson. Rick Owens. First ever UK shop for vachement.” Many have been given their own area to decorate as they choose, with the encouragement to do something different. “We give people freedom, but with a certain amount of regulation,” said Joffe. “It’s more about respecting the space next to you. People can’t build walls or go to the ceiling. It’s not exactly anarchy, but it’s freedom within the parameters.”

Alongside current brands, new labels will be introduced. The Row will have its own store, and Paul Smith will recreate the layout of its original tiny Nottingham shop. Joffe is excited about the arrival of revived French cosmetics brand Buly. On the top floor, the Rose Bakery, run by Joffe’s sister Rose Carrarini, will have an expanded kitchen and dining spaces. On the floor that once housed Christopher Bailey’s office will be a project corner, which for the launch will debut a range of smock coats and bags by Frances Von Hofmannsthal in a set recreating the studio of her father, the photographer Lord Snowdon.

The move was precipitated by a vast rent rise, explains Joffe. When they first went to Dover Street rents were relatively low, and there were no other fashion outlets on the sleepy Mayfair street. Since then, Acne Studios, Victoria Beckham and McQ, as well as galleries such as David Zwirner and Sprüth Magers, have moved in. When it came to renogatiate the contract, the price had doubled. “The new Haymarket building was also owned by our landlord Alan Sugar. Because of all the rents skyrocketing on Dover Street [Sugar’s property company Amsprop Estates] said, ‘We have to triple your rent’ — everyone else was paying three times the price. We settled for double, but then they said, ‘By the way, we have this other building on Haymarket, would you like to have a look?’ ” (The Haymarket property has since been sold by Sugar.)

“It’s double the rent but three times the size,” said Joffe. “We needed more space. We did the maths. It made sense. We like that kind of accidental good fortune.” Financially, DSM took years to come good. “In the beginning, no one understood it,” said Joffe. “A lot of our core Comme clients didn’t want to be polluted by other brands.”

Kawakubo founded Comme des Garçons in 1969 in Tokyo. Her first show in Paris in 1981 caused a storm with its all-black, destroyed aesthetic. She has proven herself to be a rare designer who can embrace chaos while respecting the traditions of her craft. South African-born Joffe met Kawakubo while working in Tokyo in the 1980s; the couple married in 1992. Comme has slowly evolved, creating a label for protégé Junya Watanabe in 1992, along with an ever-growing number of other brands.

Before DSM, Comme’s London store had been an act of minimalism on Brook Street in a space owned by the boutique Browns and run as a franchise. When that deal was up, Joffe began looking for a store of their own and found Dover Street, that had once been the home of the Institute of Contemporary Art. Initially, they thought of having just a traditional Comme store on the ground floor. “Then I said to Rei, ‘Why don’t we take the whole building and invite other people?’ She said, ‘Like Kensington Market?’, which is what Rei loved when she first came to London in the 1960s.”
Kensington Market was an indoor clash of autonomous stalls that fuelled London counterculture into the 1990s. “We would do our shop,” said Joffe, “and then all the space that we didn’t need, we’d invite people to do their thing, just like in the spirit that people would take a space in Kensington Market.”

Joffe cites a March 2007 article in British Vogue, “The Best Shop in the World”, as marking a turning point in their fortunes. “We’d had fans, but it wasn’t doing enough. Then that came out. It was really sudden, after a lot of hard work.” Today, annual revenues for the Comme group stand at $260m, with revenues for DSM in London at £23m. Combined, the three DSM stores account for 35 per cent of Comme revenues.

From the start, the store mixed luxury brands with the work of the young and unknown. “In the beginning, we went to see four people: Hedi [Slimane], Raf [Simons], Alber [Elbaz] and Azzedine [Alaïa].” All four agreed to create products for the launch. When Phoebe Philo’s first Céline collection arrived in 2009, DSM was a natural home. Soon, more conglomerate brands saw the benefits of taking a space in the store.

Nicolas Ghesquière’s first collection for Louis Vuitton in 2014 was said to be a tough sell in its own boutiques — too much of a shock change for established customers. At DSM, the collection flew out. And last year, Gucci debuted the fresh retail vision of its new creative director Alessandro Michele with a humble wallpapered space in the store.
Meanwhile, DSM has built a reputation as an early advocate for designers such as JW Anderson, vachement and Simone Rocha. “We always wanted both,” said Joffe. “We wanted that clash, that unexpected synergy that happens between things.”

When Joffe showed the brands their spaces at the new site, a few balked at their adjacencies. They were moved. Rather than renting out the spaces, DSM takes a commission, so different areas do not become isolated fiefdoms. “It’s not like a department store, where they pay rent and have minimums. It’s their stock, so we get lots of swapping of product, which is important,” said Joffe. The result is a rare egalitarianism, with underground labels such as Palace Skateboards given as much credence as mega-brands like Dior.

Joffe runs the store day-to-day but in control is Kawakubo. “Rei is the overall vision,” he said. “She does the whole image, all the common areas and the Comme brands, then she wants to see what everyone else is doing. She won’t criticise their space but she might say, ‘This is boring.’ Dickon then goes to the brand and says, ‘Do something more interesting.’ We don’t want them to spend a lot of money. We try to tell them: do something that can be changed a lot.”
Kawakubo has relinquished many responsibilities to Joffe and his team. “She can’t check all the brands,” he said. “If it were only things she likes, there’d be nothing in it. She likes people who work hard and who have something to say. That’s the one criterion.”

Retail is central to her ethos. “Without it there’s nothing,” said Joffe. “Rei’s always said the salesperson is the most important person. No one knows the amount of staff education she does. She has people come in to talk about philosophy and how to deal with customers. Everyone has to have a rounded knowledge.”

Joffe has described the company’s structure as horizontal, with each of its brands and products supporting the other. The success of its fragrances, wallets and T-shirts under the Play logo allows Kawakubo to create her catwalk Comme collection without compromise. Seen in this context, DSM is both a thrilling experiment and an enlightened strategy for sustained growth.
The move to Haymarket comes at a time of regeneration of St James’s by the Crown Estate. It is in the midst of a £500m project on new-builds and restorations. Now, without its asking, it has one of fashion’s most influential stores opening within its confines. It is easy to imagine the sleepy, small shops nearby being snapped up by the sort of affordable luxury brands that swarm to reborn retail areas.
It’s all so much work for Joffe. Does he find it fun? “Fun is not quite the word. It’s exciting. It’s what I do. There’s job satisfaction. There’s a lot of problems — with the designers, the adjacencies, the egos, the whole dynamic with Rei. It’s a nightmare, really, but it’s what pushes us forwards. There’s no progress without strife. If it was easy, everybody would be doing it. It’s also thinking about the future. There’s going to be a day when she’s not around. We have to . . . But that’s another conversation.”

Comme des Garçons has long been deft with collaborations, just like the juxtaposition of brands at Dover Street Market. It’s especially true of streetwear or casual brands, and for the launch of the new DSM there will be limited edition collaborations with Vans (pictured) and Timberland. Often these collaborations play with original design: for the launch, Kawakubo has “reimagined” the classic Burberry trench in a series of exclusive one-offs. It’s a clever twist on DSM inhabiting the old Burberry building, respecting heritage but taking it somewhere else entirely.

Labels are also eager to create products for DSM, and not just for its openings. Twice a year, the store closes for a three-day refit to bring in new collections and fresh décor, opening with celebratory limited editions. For the Haymarket launch, Simone Rocha has created a special gold capsule collection, while Sacai, Thom Browne and Molly Goddard (dress pictured) have made pieces that will only be available at the new space.

But it’s not just all high-minded designer fashion: East-London hardware store Labour & Wait has made a range in black. Can’t afford Comme des Garçons? Never mind. Leave the new Dover Street Market with a new black plastic bucket, yours for £30.

Re: random fashion jersey bibs

PostPosted: Sun Mar 20, 2016 7:18 am
by Julio
maybe i need to dive further into vachement and consider the possibility that my opinion of it is tainted by its oversaturated beginnings/INSTANT STREET STYLE BASED GAWD BCUZ $1000 SWEATSHIRT (that might be gildan) (JK) and that maybe there's far more going on than my initial dismissive nature regarding it?
but maybe i'm only considering this because WOW DSM SELLING U WOW GOOD FOR YOU & YOUR CLOTHES THAT I DON'T PARTICULARLY LIKE

but hey if i continue down the path of not liking it i should be able to say why; and say so beyond my opinion that it looks like a lot of things i've seen elsewhere put into a blender with an end result that is less than the sum of its parts (or even the value of one of its initial components)?

just thinking out loud carry on

Re: random fashion jersey bibs

PostPosted: Sun Mar 20, 2016 10:04 am
by trasparenti
really enjoyed this article about how Banana Republic started as a safari brand

http://www.adweek.com/news/advertising- ... and-170059

They also mentioned this guy's blog which has a ton of pictures and stuff from his collection of vintage BR stuff

http://scottcadams.com/bananarepublic/

all his scans of the catalogs are great

Image

blurbs about clothes and products are still done almost identically in Japanese magazines today. In fact, I think a store like the original BR would kill in Japan. If there's anything this country likes, it's 100% erstwhile vintage stuff sold in suitably decorated stores.

Re: random fashion jersey bibs

PostPosted: Sun Mar 20, 2016 10:10 am
by Copeland
Julio wrote:maybe i need to dive further into vachement and consider the possibility that my opinion of it is tainted by its oversaturated beginnings/INSTANT STREET STYLE BASED GAWD BCUZ $1000 SWEATSHIRT (that might be gildan) (JK) and that maybe there's far more going on than my initial dismissive nature regarding it?
but maybe i'm only considering this because WOW DSM SELLING U WOW GOOD FOR YOU & YOUR CLOTHES THAT I DON'T PARTICULARLY LIKE

but hey if i continue down the path of not liking it i should be able to say why; and say so beyond my opinion that it looks like a lot of things i've seen elsewhere put into a blender with an end result that is less than the sum of its parts (or even the value of one of its initial components)?

just thinking out loud carry on


That sounds like a good enough reason for not liking it. I think overcomplicated justifications for fashion taste, whether conceptual or political are often not very truthful. It's probably the least dishonest to judge something on its superficial appearance. The reasons usually come after. If vachement looked a little better, its dissenters probably wouldn't mind as much its business practices or narrative in the press.

Re: random fashion jersey bibs

PostPosted: Sun Mar 20, 2016 11:10 am
by kyung
Image

Image

Image

Re: random fashion jersey bibs

PostPosted: Sun Mar 20, 2016 12:59 pm
by sknss
Is that a time jacket?

Re: random fashion jersey bibs

PostPosted: Sun Mar 20, 2016 4:34 pm
by jujumaster
Copeland wrote:
Julio wrote:maybe i need to dive further into vachement and consider the possibility that my opinion of it is tainted by its oversaturated beginnings/INSTANT STREET STYLE BASED GAWD BCUZ $1000 SWEATSHIRT (that might be gildan) (JK) and that maybe there's far more going on than my initial dismissive nature regarding it?
but maybe i'm only considering this because WOW DSM SELLING U WOW GOOD FOR YOU & YOUR CLOTHES THAT I DON'T PARTICULARLY LIKE

but hey if i continue down the path of not liking it i should be able to say why; and say so beyond my opinion that it looks like a lot of things i've seen elsewhere put into a blender with an end result that is less than the sum of its parts (or even the value of one of its initial components)?

just thinking out loud carry on


That sounds like a good enough reason for not liking it. I think overcomplicated justifications for fashion taste, whether conceptual or political are often not very truthful. It's probably the least dishonest to judge something on its superficial appearance. The reasons usually come after. If vachement looked a little better, its dissenters probably wouldn't mind as much its business practices or narrative in the press.


No. No. No.

vachement is the second coming of Christ himself. If you dont like it then you obviously dont understand high fashion. Jeeeez.

Re: random fashion jersey bibs

PostPosted: Mon Mar 21, 2016 3:47 am
by saveed_samir
its the final season of black fleece and thats kind of sad !

Re: random fashion jersey bibs

PostPosted: Mon Mar 21, 2016 10:53 am
by harmsalmon
Sedaris essay in the New yorker about shopping in Japan (in which he details his buys of Kapital/Harnden/Cdg??)

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/ ... s-in-tokyo

Re: random fashion jersey bibs

PostPosted: Mon Mar 21, 2016 11:32 am
by Julio
trasparenti wrote:really enjoyed this article about how Banana Republic started as a safari brand
...
...


i have an old safari/photographer's vest which i believe is BR
Image
yeah i used it for my shikamaru halloween costume but sometimes when i'm lazy to bring a bag around i use it too

Re: random fashion jersey bibs

PostPosted: Mon Mar 21, 2016 6:02 pm
by rublev
Image

Image

let me climb

Re: random fashion jersey bibs

PostPosted: Mon Mar 21, 2016 8:38 pm
by bouquet
trasparenti wrote:really enjoyed this article about how Banana Republic started as a safari brand

I was surprised to see my very own nana-vest in the scan transparenti posted! I found it at goodwill in my hometown last year or something, and bought it on a whim, not really knowing how I'd like it. It's actually become one of my fav things to throw on top of any outfit really. It might be water resistant idk? water beads and rolls off of it so that's kinda neat. It is highly handy for carrying around snacks or a medium sized textbook, depending on which pocket is being used.
Image
Cool tag design, definitely a different "feel" than current banana
Image
I have never actually utilized this pocket, but it's fully functional and looks awesome honestly. I've put things in it though, and I could seriously carry around several notebooks or a textbook. basically a backpack.
Image
Spoiler:
And finally a low res fit pic
Image