Random Rhetorical Hypebeast Fashion Thoughts

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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby jujumaster » Fri Jan 13, 2017 1:45 pm

jujumaster wrote:one last before Xmas.

feeling Andrea Pompilio SS17, that 70s typewriter nerd by day who rocks the b boy stance and busts sick headspins by night


B Boy went all political activist for AW17

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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby une_impasse » Fri Jan 13, 2017 4:56 pm

for what it's worth: i got to see some of the Calvin Klein Jeans pieces a few days ago (not Collection, but the Jeans stuff that ends up and Nordstrom's, Urban Outfitters, etc.) that Raf worked on and it's not too bad. it appears as if Raf actually will leave a real mark on every facet of the brand. the Jeans stuff usually looks generic and super down market but i thought these pieces had some real design, not revolutionary, but enough to pull Calvin out of a rut.
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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby pirxthepilot » Sat Jan 14, 2017 6:41 am

interesting discussion on sf last few days of the ethics of consumer capitalism, in particular @dieworkwear- sample quote from him:

"I think it's fine to think that companies should be more socially responsible. I don't think anyone wants to see socially irresponsible behavior. I'm saying: when people bring this stuff up, in terms of actions, it always goes back to "buy local," "buy from rich countries," "buy less altogether," or "eschew capitalism."

At which point, if you originally cared about the welfare of people in poor countries, you're doing worse for them than if you just bought the thing from the sweatshop. Better working conditions are always better, but no working conditions is worse than bad working conditions. And at the end of the day, all these views seem like they're just about protecting Western jobs. Or ideas about injecting meaning into the lives of rich Western people, who can enjoy all the benefits of post-industrial society (peace, law and order, liberal norms, etc) while everyone else is just trying to sell their cheap, crappy things so they can survive."

he mentions this article: http://web.mit.edu/krugman/www/smokey.html
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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby oucho » Sat Jan 14, 2017 7:25 am

Whilst reading a very interesting book about cottage gardens I came across a passage that said that the romantic idea of the 19th c English cottage garden vs the terrible slums was not real. Idealistic visions of children playing in cottage gardens did not reflect the fact that the children would much rather have been working in factories than working the land (which they would have been doing if they were living in a cottage). Not to mention cottage thatching is very high maintenance and a harbourer of disease and pests, and cottages are cold.

The scary thing is that because there is a demand for ethical and sustainable production businesses are going to find a way to offer that, or appear to offer that, even if they aren't really. I like to think of fashion marketing as a nuclear arms race which leaves no room for honesty and which no one can step back from.

On the other hand I've heard stories of big brands switching production of suits from one factory to another for a price difference of 50c, ON A SUIT?!! Which is insane.
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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby pirxthepilot » Sat Jan 14, 2017 7:50 am

you have to understand how things work within corporations. wall street analysts care about one thing: profits. if your top line is not growing, as of course it won't be sometimes, then you better be saving on costs. if you can demonstrate that you've cut several million dollars a year from your production,you're at least being a pro-active manager and it might keep your stock from being downgraded. until the next quarter

tl;dr dont become a garm world big shot, stick with your mum

(incidentally yes there are pressures specific to wall street but i would say this managerial mindset is equally in evidence in the public arts institutions or media organisations that i know well. and i mean god help the poor nhs)
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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby oucho » Sat Jan 14, 2017 9:19 am

Top line didn't grow last year so I locked mum in the garage and forced her to make a fashion collection
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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby jujumaster » Sun Jan 15, 2017 3:29 pm

Prada AW17

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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby Cowboy » Thu Jan 19, 2017 2:28 am

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This shows courage
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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby tweefwend » Thu Jan 19, 2017 3:11 pm

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Do it for the culture
They gon' bite like vultures
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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby jujumaster » Thu Jan 19, 2017 8:12 pm

cmmn swdn with a nice little collection, far cry from that cliche blvck streetwear rubbish they started out with

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http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2017/0 ... -D050.html
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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby ramseames » Fri Jan 20, 2017 2:43 pm

http://hypebeast.com/2017/1/heron-prest ... collection

off white is bad but at least it contains original ideas every season

this is basically the center of a venn diagram of the worst brands making clothes in 2017
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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby rublev » Fri Jan 20, 2017 3:11 pm

wanted one of those garment dyed poplin maggie howell shirts. it sat in tres b sale for weeks, then went to 50% off + additional 15% off code and i still looked at it and thought 'hmmm'.... not surprisingly it went.

anyone know if the MH website sale go deeper into discount? it's a bit rubbish just now
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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby parastexis » Sun Jan 22, 2017 1:36 pm

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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby rublev » Mon Jan 23, 2017 4:03 pm

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Luxury Brands Struggle to Steer Iranians Away From Knockoffs - WSJ

Iranians love high fashion, but luxury companies planning to tap Persian appetite for designer clothes and bags are facing stiff competition from their very own brands—albeit fake ones.

In the forked walkways of Tehran’s central bazaar, many shops offer convincing copies of Gucci belts and Cartier handbags. One young vendor sells a fake Louis Vuitton belt made in Turkey for about $8; the authentic product retails for around $400. “I have the box if you want to wrap it as a gift,” he offers as a deal-clincher.


Spoiler:
Cut off from the global economy by international sanctions over the past decade, Iran’s importers have had a tough time bringing in real European goods that the growing middle class wants to buy. Fakes—many high-quality—have been meeting that demand.

Now that most sanctions on Iran have been removed with the country’s nuclear deal, this ecosystem of knockoffs is confounding genuine luxury retailers, slowing their entry into a promising new market.

Despite Iran’s ultraconservative leadership and official aversion for Western values, industry analysts see the youthful, oil-rich country of 80 million as an exciting prospect for retailers of the world’s most famous brands. Per capita consumer spending in Tehran’s urban core averaged $4,700 last year, the highest level in the Middle East, according to the London-based Planet Retail.

Roberto Cavalli opened a boutique in Tehran’s wealthy Zaferaniyeh neighborhood last February, and Versace followed in April, both in partnership with Iranian businessman Farshid Jamali.
“Sales have been satisfactory, but lower than what we expected,” Mr. Jamali said.


The reason, he said, was that many wealthy Iranians aren’t well informed about the change in the retail landscape and still assume luxury goods in local boutiques are convincing fake versions of the Western brands they profess to be.

There are no statistics on the market for fake fashion in Iran. While making and selling knockoffs is technically illegal, they are sold openly, with little sign of government oversight.

“In Iran it’s all fake,” said Mehrnaz, a Tehran-based businesswoman and luxury shopper who asked not to be identified by her full name. “There are no licenses, even for those who have the logos and claim to be original.”

Consumer doubt has been reinforced by players like Zilan, a company that has imported clothes made by Zara and other brands under Spain’s Inditex SA since 2006. Its stores look like official Zara outlets, according to its website. Zilan’s existence means Zara would face competition with unlicensed, rogue versions of its own stores if it entered Iran.

An Inditex spokeswoman said Zara had no stores in Iran, and declined to comment further. Zilan couldn’t be reached for comment. Zilan is using the Zara brand and selling Zara clothes, but there is no relationship between the companies.

While Iran has well-functioning trademark laws, Inditex would have to register its Zara brand and go to court to shut Zilan down, according to Sadegh Shamshiri, an intellectual property lawyer at Hengam Legal Services in Tehran. That process would take at least a few months, Mr. Shamshiri said.

Iranian consumers have grown used to a market littered with fake goods, and in some cases prefer them to the real thing because of their affordability and availability. One Tehran-based importer of fakes from China, who would only identify herself as Forouz for fear of legal liability, said interest in counterfeit goods began to pick up a year or two ago as upwardly mobile Iranians grew more brand-conscious.

“My Gucci sandals sold out, and I am now going to China to buy more,” said Forouz, who advertises using the Instagram handle mezon.blanche. “Women love them. I have customers who drive Toyota Prados, own holiday villas in northern Iran, but they don’t pay for the original.”

Even if the Iranian government tackled the impostor problem, foreign luxury brands still face the challenge of changing consumer habits.

“Right now, our goods are 40% less expensive than the same in Dubai, but there is a perception here that it’s expensive anyway,” said Mr. Jamali, the Iranian businessman backing the Roberto Cavalli and Versace boutiques in Tehran.

Luxury brands learned from setting up shop in China in the early 1990s that being a pioneer in a market with large potential can pay dividends, even if the business isn’t an immediate success, said Armando Branchini, the vice chairman of the Milan-based Fondazione Altagamma, a foundation that represents Italian luxury brands. It took until the early 2000s, when China joined the World Trade Organization, for Italian luxury brands to begin reaping their rewards there, he said.

“The pioneers benefited years later from having their reputation established much better than the second followers,” Mr. Branchini said.

By the time Iran’s market makes a similar transformation, however, Sadra Hosseini thinks e-commerce will be a powerful competitor to traditional luxury outlets.

Mr. Hosseini co-founded The Luxe London, a U.K.-based startup that has been selling luxury goods to Iranians directly from Europe, eliminating middlemen and leaving little doubt about the authenticity of products.

The Luxe London has done hundreds of thousands of pounds worth of sales in the past year and a half, he said, a sign that retailers may have online solutions to address the lack of confidence in locally available luxury goods.

“There’s an Iranian mentality that if it’s made in Iran it’s crap,” he said. “That will persist in the future.”
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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby Cowboy » Tue Jan 24, 2017 6:58 pm

I'm trying to place what season this dries women's piece is from and struggling if someone could help.

It was bought at Bergdorfs a little less than 2 years ago apparently.

Perhaps it wasn't shown on runway? I don't really know much about how ready to wear translates into retail

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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby rublev » Wed Jan 25, 2017 1:45 pm

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Want to look polished and Parisian? Vanessa Seward has the answer - FT

...the brand also falls at a fairly accessible price point (a SS17 tulip-print Italian jacquard silk blouse is €450). Seward says, “We all thought there was a gap in the market for affordable designer clothes. My label is not cheap, it’s not Zara, but we are doing really good prices, without making anyone suffer. It’s nicely produced in Europe.”


Seward’s conversation flows easily. “I have been described as neo-bourgeois,” she says.


an insight into both FT readership and vacuous self important fashion

full article
Spoiler:
The man Vanessa Seward describes as a “real creative force next to me” has just sped past the window of her new Notting Hill boutique, on a bicycle, in the rain. It’s her husband Bertrand Burgalat, an electro pop singer with a kooky 1970s-record-producer-meets-geography-teacher style. Seward and her husband have come over to London from their home in Paris to check on the shop, and he’s decided that braving the drizzle on two wheels is the best way to counter a Tube strike.

Seward cuts a more obviously glossy figure, in her largely black own-label ensemble of chunky cardigan over nude silk polo, culottes and knee boots, but the couple share an unpretentious, friendly manner. She immediately shares her umbrella when we get out of a taxi into the rain, despite wearing a highly spoilable suede coat. Burgalat, who often creates music for her shows, doesn’t look like the prescriptive type, but Seward shows her husband her clothes “to have the guy’s point of view”. In her animated French accent she says: “I want to design collections which men like. Sometimes with fashion we forget that. It’s upsetting when you have invested a lot of money in something and your boyfriend says, ‘Oh my god, are you going to wear that?’ ”

Taking male opinion into account is frequently regarded as a feminist faux pas in high fashion circles, a capitulation to conventional codes of what’s “attractive”. However, Seward’s approach is less about courting male approval than creating “clothes that are understandable for everyone. I don’t like it when sometimes, as with art, if you don’t know the story and the artist then you don’t get it. I don’t want my clothes to only be for insiders,” she says.

Dedicated followers of French fashion and loyal customers of APC, with whom she has collaborated, will be familiar with Seward, but for many UK consumers her first boutique in the country will provide an introduction. That, or recent images of the Duchess of Cambridge wearing a floral dress from her autumn/winter collection (“Great timing, I have a lucky star,” says Seward).

Born in Buenos Aires, the daughter of a diplomat, 47-year-old Seward grew up in London and Paris, and trained at the Studio Berçot fashion institute. She worked at Chanel for nine years from 1991, then with Tom Ford at Yves Saint Laurent, and joined Azzaro in 2002, serving as creative director from 2003 until 2011. The following year, she started creating capsule collections for APC. “APC is super Left Bank, the ideal cool student at La Sorbonne,” says Seward. Her label’s aesthetic could be seen as that student grown up, with a flat on the Right Bank and a job on the board of the Pompidou Centre. Her clothes are feminine and wearable, with a retro, intellectual edge.

It was APC owner Jean Touitou who suggested Seward start her own brand, and she says it had always been “in a way my secret wish”. She and Touitou are partners in Vanessa Seward, which launched in 2015. She is adamant she “couldn’t have attempted it on my own, at my age. To create a team with the production, and everything, it takes years. Doing it with Jean is like I won seven years in the process.”

The decision to open a store in Notting Hill, in addition to three in Paris and one in LA, was based on the fact that there’s a branch of APC there which is “doing really well”. Designed by Laurent Deroo, the new shop is minimal but warm, with navy walls, marble till, and 60s-style coloured glass panels.

Like APC, the brand also falls at a fairly accessible price point (a SS17 tulip-print Italian jacquard silk blouse is €450). Seward says, “We all thought there was a gap in the market for affordable designer clothes. My label is not cheap, it’s not Zara, but we are doing really good prices, without making anyone suffer. It’s nicely produced in Europe.” One of Touitou’s other reasons for collaborating with Seward was her womanliness. “I have always been shy with femininity/womanhood,” he tells me by email. “That border between grace and possible vulgarity always scared me but I knew she could do it. For me her look is uptown Parisienne.”

Discussing the nuances of Parisian style, then scrolling through Instagram looking at French It girls or interior design, Seward’s conversation flows easily. “I have been described as neo-bourgeois,” she says, “as I have a more polished thing going on, a bit sexy but also Sloaney and glamorous. In France, I’m worn by a lot of actresses [such as her friends Julie Delpy and Léa Seydoux, and Isabelle Huppert] and authors [Leïla Slimani, winner of France’s Goncourt prize] who like my clothes because they can relate to them. They can go to an office meeting, feel good and not be ridiculous. I wanted to make clothes that give you confidence. They make you look good but after that it’s your personality that comes across.”

Seward learnt about the power of clothes early. As a diplomat’s wife, her mother would go out, “to all sorts of events such as the embassy ball, and she would really go all the way. She used to make herself little hats with veils. The way you looked was important in my family. At least I made a living out of it.”

In her twenties, while clubbing in Parisian nightclubs such as Les Bains Douches, she noted that all you needed to mingle with the celebrities who partied there was eye-catching style.

“I also got my job at Chanel because of my look,” she adds. “I was 21, going out a lot, and I would wear, say, a tartan mini from Miss Selfridge, very black hair, very red lipstick. At the time Chanel was “very preserved, we never talked about prices or used computers, then when I went to Saint Laurent it was much more corporate, everyone cc-ed in the emails.” From Karl Lagerfeld, (“He is so great”) she learnt that “I could never do what he does, drawing all the collections, doing all the fittings, when people have a problem he always has an answer”. Trying to balance her life is challenging enough: spending time with her six-year-old daughter and husband, visiting their house in the Pyrénées, launching a business and having some semblance of a social life (“I never go out, I see my girlfriends maybe every two months”).

From Loris Azzaro, Seward discovered “l’adjustement and what was flattering. Everything was ‘instead of plastic surgery, buy a dress’. The cut would make your legs look longer, your waist a bit smaller . . . I keep all those secrets.”

Flattering cuts are something Seward really works on. “Sometimes my designs are not so wow, you know, but when a woman tries on my clothes, that’s when I get a new client. I like to design real clothes and that doesn’t mean they can’t be glamorous, and make you look good.”

Not that she takes herself too seriously. When Seward opened her LA store she had T-shirts printed with slogans announcing her arrival: “LA me voilà”. In London there will be sweatshirts saying, “Excuse my French.” This is one label where nothing is lost in translation.
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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby rublev » Wed Jan 25, 2017 2:49 pm

@pirxthepilot yeah not far off MH etc, and i don't have a problem with the writing. it's just interesting to read about a world where a 450 euro blouse is a 'fairly accessible price point' and where someone thinks this fills a gap in the market between zara and presumedly selling your organs for a cropped merino knit
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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby rublev » Wed Jan 25, 2017 2:52 pm

"without making anyone suffer"
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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby pirxthepilot » Wed Jan 25, 2017 3:02 pm

you need to hang around that 'charming little boutique on westbourne grove' set more (or maybe not).
kind of interesting how lucrative that sector is though if you know how to play it. the marni coat i was stalking before realising it was just a holiday infatuation hung around in loads of places but in matches sold out almost immediately. i think the reason is that they have b&m shops on westbourne, marylebone high st etc, where the staff are super-professional (my ex lived around the corner, they would greet her by name, text her when things she might like came in etc).
and like i say, teen favourites like OL want 275+ for a shirt these days so..
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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby rublev » Wed Jan 25, 2017 3:45 pm

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feels like OL has changed a lot in just a couple of years. i've always preferred the weirder stuff so it's good basic sweats and shirts no longer dominate, but the price jumps just seem weird? i mean if the quality was there i'd have less of an issue but it's not. i don't mind OL trolling when it comes to some stuff but it feels a little awkward now
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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby jujumaster » Wed Jan 25, 2017 5:08 pm

Having never taken notice of it before, going from the mens fashion weeks straight into this glitzy Couture is such a weird contrast.
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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby bels » Wed Jan 25, 2017 5:23 pm

i was trying to make a stabiliser strap for my aoku bag and I put a needle straight through my finger. (hang around with me and all you hear is "dwr... ventile... stabiliser strap... crotch gusset...") Is this the plight of the artisan?

@rams yes it is. I probably shouldn't have bought it is just that I'm always looking for some kind of very lightweight bag for summer essentials or day trips on the bike. This probably isn't it. It's a bit too lightweight (can't carry a d lock, can just about carry a water bottle but it's a pain) and really doesn't have much space. If someone offered me near what I paid I would probably sell it but I don't know that anyone would
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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby windowflowers » Thu Jan 26, 2017 11:52 am

anybody know that pic of like some deconstructed/smooshed together white sneakers? looked like jordan 4s like stacked on top of each other, maybe with some af1 bits and other shit in there? pretty sure it was some designer shit, looked like a runway backstage kinda thing. feel like it was probably the kinda thing that circulated around tumblr a bunch, but I can't find it anywhere and it's killing me

edit: ya it was the eckhaus latta thanks yall
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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby jrisk » Thu Jan 26, 2017 4:55 pm

i think uniqlo u ss17 looks pretty cool

this vest and jacket combo caught my eye:

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look how the jacket snaps onto the back!

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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby ramseames » Thu Jan 26, 2017 6:33 pm

bela i bet you could get like 80 percent of msrp for it on sufu right now, especially if you find someone in the uk who wants it so you can ship it cheaply

alternatively just hold on to it until he sells out of the initial run i guess
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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby odradek » Fri Jan 27, 2017 9:21 pm

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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby jujumaster » Sat Jan 28, 2017 2:25 pm

Park Vienna with goat store model

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Spoiler:
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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby jujumaster » Sun Jan 29, 2017 12:18 pm

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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby Morlin » Sun Jan 29, 2017 6:17 pm

I hate cotton! I've been layering linen + wool the past few days and it feels so much cleaner / warm-but-breathable. Sweat trapped under thick cotton just feels gross in comparison
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I think that it is not. Cowichan, etc., If you prefer a thick knit, how about you? It is cool there is atmosphere!
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Re: random fashion jersey tucks

Postby freddy » Mon Jan 30, 2017 2:33 pm

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I asked for measurements for a pair of painted denim from a Russian EBay seller and I got this hand drawn led picture. I'm amazed!
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