S.E.H Kelly

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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby charybdis » Tue Oct 01, 2013 4:47 pm

The tweed is very beautiful and the collar looks great, but looking at the fit on the model, I feel like the jacket is a tad paunchy.
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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby freddy » Sat Oct 05, 2013 11:39 pm

i felt like my fit the yday was very SEH kelly like but americana
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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby bels » Sun Oct 06, 2013 2:39 am

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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby Syeknom » Sun Oct 06, 2013 6:35 am

That's a cool look, nice trousers on that guy.

They just released these charcoal tweed trousers that I was planning to buy but medium is sold out instantly - guess most of it went in-store or by some sort of pre-ordering. I already spent my money elsewhere so couldn't have afforded them anyway but it's a shame because they turned out even nicer looking than I expected - great shape on the legs.

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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby Syeknom » Thu Dec 05, 2013 5:37 pm

Charcoal-grey wool bellows vest

Very nice looking tweed piece. Buttons connect by loops, huge looking bellows pockets and a longer cut at the back.

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The brass buckle on the back of the vest is made by a foundry in the West Midlands founded in the 1800s. It is the last such foundry in an area once heaving with them. Its sand-casting method — which sees 940°C molten brass poured by hand from a crucible into sand-made moulds — is ancient and infallible.


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White detachable-collar cotton shirt

Really hoping to snag this for myself - waiting to hear from Paul if they have any smalls left at the warehouse. May just risk a size up because it's a really ideal shirt for me.

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Button-down Shirts

Not a fan of button-downs myself and the collar roll doesn't look especially magical but if you're after something a bit different from qlo/brooks brothers:

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Other bits and pieces:

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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby omgimacarrot » Thu Dec 05, 2013 10:08 pm

I love the tab collar on those oxfords. The collar roll is kind of weak, but I feel like if it had a strong roll, it would be out of place. I'm starting to appreciate S.E.H Kelly the more I look at the designs and the quality of the materials. Or maybe its just because of the exclusivity, but that's not a bad thing.
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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby Syeknom » Fri Dec 13, 2013 8:01 am

Got my detachable collar shirt in the post today - it's very nice but a quick try-on reveals that the sleeves are a bit too short. I'll probably keep it anyway (they're sold out so no exchanging for a medium) and can just roll the sleeves or layer or whatever. Fabric is nice but I've not had a good look yet. Will post photos later.

Very interesting recent release:

Navy-blue cotton-twill trench coat

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Details on this thing are crazy: beautifully hidden throat latch, concealed channels for the belt (see last image), one-piece sleeves, side-entry pockets, higher-than-usual collar stand, deeper back yoke than front, etc.
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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby bels » Fri Dec 13, 2013 9:35 am

SEH Kelly have really good mannequin synergy
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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby starfox64 » Fri Dec 13, 2013 9:36 am

where are their mannequins made?
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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby Syeknom » Fri Dec 13, 2013 9:46 am

I'll be sure to ask when I visit the workshop!
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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby bels » Fri Dec 13, 2013 9:51 am

The last UK mannequin maker, deep in rural Dorset.
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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby Syeknom » Fri Dec 13, 2013 1:58 pm

Shirt:

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Sleeves and body are definitely a bit too short but I think I'll keep it. The next size up (sold out anyway) only has an extra half inch on the sleeves and is no longer in the body. Detachable collar is dead cool and it'll be really fun to layer with. Buttons are very pleasing.
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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby bels » Fri Dec 13, 2013 5:06 pm

Looks very nice.

They shouldn't have put that pocket on though
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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby Syeknom » Sat Dec 28, 2013 4:39 pm

StyleForum Interviews Paul and Sara of S.E.H. Kelly

I first stumbled onto S.E.H. Kelly through StyleForum last winter. Someone linked a picture of an amazing wool tweed peacoat, and I was immediately taken in by the spot on details and the careful design. I was lucky enough to be able to talk with Paul and Sara, the designers behind the label, a few weeks ago. Check out their StyleForum thread here.

Ben: What's your background? How did you get started?


S.E.H. Kelly: We began in 2009, with a minuscule set of garments intended to kit out the average man for a single day. The collection, such as it was back then, comprised a shirt with a semi-cutaway collar, trousers, and an overshirt.

Prior to that, Sara -- one-half of S.E.H Kelly and the one with her name above the door -- worked on Savile Row, for a tailoring and couture house. The conversation came about between the two of us one day: why not make relaxed, everyday garments, using the materials mostly used only for formal-wear on the Row?

It seemed a sensible idea, so we set about making that first collection. I remember we had some brushed wool-cotton shirting, and some extremely fine corduroy, and we used the same horn buttons we still use today. Being a small and unknown operation -- which, to most prosperous mills and factories is a pesky sort of operation -- it helped that Sara had previously made the acquaintance of the makers with whom we needed, back then, to help put that small collection together.

B: How would you describe the S.E.H. Kelly aesthetic?

SK: What we make at S.E.H Kelly is what the two of us like, and what we enjoy wearing. That's as deep-lying as our approach to design gets. We're not the most self- analytical or reflective sorts, Sara and I, and we avoid superlatives to describe our work since there's never much meaning in them. Even when describing our garments in a term as unprepossessing as, say, "simple" -- well, simple compared to what? It is quite subjective. We can boast of the cloth we use and the quality of the make, since these are things that, as observers of it, we feel qualified and entitled to champion. But our designs: we leave descriptions of that to other people. Our aesthetic seems to us the most normal and natural thing in the world -- it is just what we like the look of and find pleasure in. We enjoy putting thought and work into aspects that are concealed, known only to the wearer, so that might be why, on the outside, our garments seem (relatively) simple.

Materials also have a lot of bearing on our aesthetic. The materials we use are dictated entirely by the available wares of British mills -- some of which is limited, such as cotton, and some of which is huge and varied, such as wool and tweed. On the whole -- and with several notable exceptions -- compared to that of their counterparts abroad, British cloth tends to be thick and heavy. Thus our garments are robust. Because of this, to assemble our garments from such cloth, we work with factories adept at strength and robustness. This is why our shirts are mostly made from thick cotton and have French seams; no point trying to achieve a soft, lightweight, continental-style shirt, when that isn't what our makers do best.

We don't have an archive or collection of old garments from which to work, and we don't have a room full of patterns to base anything on. When we develop a garment, we develop it from scratch, and to some extent from first principles. We're respectful of tradition, but aren't restricted by it. A recent example of what I mean is our new trench coat. It is a classic trench in many ways: its length, collar, draped one-piece sleeves. But the parts of many trenches that you see today seem to us vestigial; only present now for sake of appearance. Strip them back and you end up with a trench definitely still what it says on the tin, but in some ways cleaner -- and, if not better suited to modern life, then at least no less well-suited to it.

B: Clearly high quality production - and particularly traditional English production - is important to the brand. How have you found manufacturers, and what's the process of working with them?

SK: Back to the first question, we set out armed with the contacts Sara had made during her time on Savile Row. There were a few woollen mills, a button-maker, a shirting
mill, and one or two sample-rooms in London. Since then, we've found other makers largely by word-of-mouth. When you travel to say, West Yorkshire, to a woollen mill, it's not uncommon for someone you meet along the way -- often someone who works at the mill -- to recommend another maker nearby. Happens a lot: we happened upon maker we work with in Ireland via a mill on the same street, for instance.

Whoever we work with, what we like best is to get to the root of what they do, and work closely with them. For example, we've been with the outerwear factory we work with in North London almost since day one. We -- well, Sara, most of the time -- is there every other day, for most of the day, and they're now like family to us. We eat together, chat, joke, argue; have sampled coats and jackets with them on Boxing Days and New Year's Eve and Days. We hope to some extent that their success is our success, and vice-versa. We work together to achieve a very particular type and style and quality of garment. There are umpteen facets to the manufacturing of any garment, from the amount of fusing in a placket, to the millimetre alignment of buttons relative to button-holes, to a great many other things. We're exacting in how we want our garments to look and to feel, and without knowing every facet, and how each one affects the finished garment, well -- you cannot be satisfied.

A recent examples of this is the horn button-maker we work with. Only after spending a good amount of time with them, and observing the different stages of horn button- making, did we manage to work out a way to achieve the exact right type of polishing on our buttons. It may sound trifling, but small things like this -- a horn button neither too matte nor too shiny, and polished in a way specific to S.E.H Kelly -- is what we enjoy trying to achieve.

Same goes for a weaver we work with -- Daniel Harris -- over on the other side of Hackney. We've been fortunate to make some terrific cloth with him, and again only made for us, over the past year. We're similar sized and aged and situated businesses, and we both share a similar outlook; our cogs turn at much the same speed. He has ideas, and so do we, and being able to inform fabric development from the very outset is wonderful. Earlier this year, for instance, he developed some rope-dyed indigo cotton for an SB1 jacket we were then designing. The finished cloth looked like raw denim, handled like soft cotton, and draped like dress cloth. Subverting what you'd expect from both garment and cloth is something we enjoy doing very much with Daniel.

One more example is the brass foundry from whom we source our buckles. A few weeks ago I hopped on the train to the Midlands and paid them a visit and, a few hours later, was two paces from the furnace from which the molten brass is collected and poured into buckle moulds. You can't help but get some instinct and feel for what the place is about by doing this. You can also follow the buckles as they leave the moulds, a few days later, and move along the line: buffing and polishing and so on. Perhaps you see an avenue along the way worth exploring; perhaps you can try to achieve a new type of finish, like we're trying right now with our horn buttons.

In each of these cases, we try to observe without pretence or ego. We understand very well that, with things like brass polishing, we know next to nothing. We ask questions symptomatic of that, and before we know it, we're armed with sufficient knowledge -- whether it be of process or material -- to improve some aspect of the finished garment.

B: How do you see the brand evolving?

SK: We began four years ago with a wardrobe fit for one man for one day, and one year in, our collection was such that it was fit for one man for one week. Now, we think, we have more than enough garments to satisfy one man for one month. And, for us, that's as big as a wardrobe needs to be. We'll keep working on new developments, sure -- but I think the pace of them will slow for the time being.

What we're doing right now is honing everything, much as described in the second half of the last answer. We want to learn and master the ins and outs of make, no matter how infinitesimal, and to perfect every one of our garments such that, one day, there will be no room for improvement. I think there's a well-known saying that indicates that that is impossible -- but right now, that's what we're trying to do. It's a satisfying endeavour.

On the other side of things, we want to keep our customers -- both those who buy from our website / workshop in London, and those we have in Japan -- satisfied with and interested in our work. If we make sure we do the best work we can, on time, and keep people happy, then the evolution of brand, such as it is, will hopefully look after itself.

B: What do you see as your place in the fashion industry?

SK: We're hermits, really, Sara and I, so we don't keep much of an eye on the rest of the industry. The only place our garments are sold, besides direct to customers from London, is in Japan. So it was only when we saw our garments on rails on shops in Japan, earlier this year, that we gained some insight into where we fit into the bigger scheme of things.
In some of the shops in Japan, like Archstyle in Sapporo, we seem to be alongside heritage or quality-led British brands, old ones and new. In others stores, like Beams International Gallery, we're next to very high-end fashion brands. And then, in others again, like 1LDK or Heather Grey Wall in Tokyo, S.E.H Kelly is alongside more casual contemporary brands; the clever, inventive ones, who seem to work on a scale similar to ours.

To answer your question, then, I'd have to say that we slot into various places in the industry. We fill a gap. A small but to us significant gap. We're not sure what that gap is exactly -- but occupy it we do.

B: What's been the biggest surprise so far? Biggest success?

SK: The biggest surprise: probably the peculiarity of being better-known in Japan than in London. The majority of our garments end up in Tokyo, Osaka, Fukuoka, Sapporo, and so on -- and then a few wind up back here. That would have to count as our biggest success, too: the stores that've taken us on board over there really are the best of the best.

B: What brands do you guys wear? Who do you look up to?

SK: I wear S.E.H Kelly, and then on my feet either Clarks or Tricker's. Sara wears custom- made garments (made at the factories we work with, usually with the same cloth we've used for S.E.H Kelly) as well as the occasional S.E.H Kelly scarf and cardigan and socks, Church's shoes, and things picked up or sent from Japan -- brands like Blue & Black, Colenimo, and Yarmo.

We don't know enough about anyone else in the industry to look up to them. There are some brands who seem to be doing well, and who make very nice things, but we're really not sure where to look to be able to look up, if you can make any sense of that.

B: It seems that, seasonally, you don't produce a large number of each design. Is that intentional?

SK: We are a small company and we must always tread carefully. Especially with new developments -- e.g. with the trench coat this year, and the peacoat last year -- we made fewer than ten. In this regard, we're fortunate to have such good relationships with our makers; most factories wouldn't be terribly happy to accommodate such small production runs.

Often the cloth we use is limited, and, generally speaking, we'd rather make many small runs of individually interesting garments, each with their own stories or reason for being, rather than larger runs of less personal garments. I understand that, for people who miss out, this approach can be frustrating, but it is a consequence of being a two-person team, and enjoying most of all working with similarly sized makers.

B: Have you thought about opening a full-fledged physical brick and mortar location?

SK: That isn't something we're interested in right now. Having the workshop is great for meeting those people who have maybe seen our garments online, or read about them in a magazine, and want to see or try them in person.
The workshop is chiefly a place for Sara and I to work, to store tools and cloth and buttons and so on. It's always terrific to meet customers in person -- but to have a proper shop, and to run it to the standards we'd want, we'd need staff, and well, lots of other commitments and responsibilities that are some departure from, and might interfere with, the making of garments.

B: What message would you like to give to our readers?

SK: I know enough about Styleforum to know that there's no pulling wool over the eyes of its members; that if they like something, they will get to the roots of it and work out for themselves if it is up to muster.

We've been lucky to meet a few Styleforum members here at the workshop, or occasionally over email or Twitter, and they are knowledgeable and courteous sorts. The only message I can offer to them and to other Styleforumers is that, if you're ever in our neck of the woods, to drop by the workshop and say hello; the internet and email is all well and good, but we posit that it's only in handling the material, inspecting the garments up close, and speaking to the people responsible for them, that -- as with lots of things -- you get a proper understanding, for better or worse, of what it is really all about.
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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby Syeknom » Sat Jan 04, 2014 8:40 pm

Went to the workshop yesterday and took shelter from a pisser of a storm. Had a lovely chat with Paul for an hour or two and tried on a bunch of stuff - that trenchcoat is something else, amazingly weighty cotton (that will apparently be used for trousers next season). Really dinky little workshop with a duplex design - loads of patterns hanging from the ceiling and jars of buttons and stuff to look through.

For those wondering the mannequin comes from a london-based company called Proportions. Apparently Paul has to spend a lot of time before shoots wrapping the mannequin's arms in thick hospital tape and stuffing socks to pad out the shoulders cause the poor doll's a bit weedy in those areas.
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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby bels » Sat Jan 04, 2014 8:52 pm

Did you mention this thread though?
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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby Syeknom » Sat Jan 04, 2014 8:53 pm

I did but forgot to show him or give him the address sorry :(
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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby Syeknom » Fri Jan 24, 2014 1:07 pm

Link-Stitch Jumper

Saw a sample piece of this in person, the weave is super interesting.

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The jumper is a lightweight, three-ply garment, made from super-soft cotton, which may feel like fine lambswool, but has all breathable and washable qualities of cotton. Good for all but the most sweltering days, then. With a simple crew-neck, it is a jumper just as happy worn over shirt or t-shirt


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The knitting on display here is the “link-stitch” — a clever, intricate thing, with columns of stitching running down, at quarter-inch intervals, over a plain-stitch base-layer. It is a meticulous stitch and so tends to be the preserve of only the finest hand-loomed knitwear makers.


The jumper is made by a hand-loomed knitwear maker. Founded 100 years ago, it works with small, hand-operated machines overseen by one person — rather than industrial-size knitting machines. It is perhaps the only maker to do so in Britain: slow going, but results bearing out the toil involved.


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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby Syeknom » Wed Mar 19, 2014 1:19 pm

Sand-colour airweave SB1 jacket

Very strong airport jacket.

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One button, big lapels, roomy flap pockets and made of a breathable "airwave cotton"

The blazer is made from airweave cotton. Airweave is so-called because some of it is air: it has holes running all the way through its structure, thus making it lightweight and breathable. Hard-wearing, too: as might be expected of a replica of a cloth favoured by Desert Rats way back when.


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Ecru heather-cotton granddad shirt

Join the collarless bandwagon!

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Great colour to this and the fabric is a blend of cotton and linen.

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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby Sam » Sun May 18, 2014 6:38 pm

SEH Kelly is now stocked in a physical shop in Japan called Bloom & Branch

Info here
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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby Syeknom » Thu Jul 31, 2014 7:12 am

@bela - ventile seam jacket hood is very detachable indeed

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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby bels » Thu Jul 31, 2014 7:22 am

Add another foot on the length and I'd robocop it. As it stands tho... looks a bit too M&S for my needs. (M&S rules though so don't mess)
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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby Syeknom » Thu Jul 31, 2014 7:24 am

I don't actually have the power to add a foot to it :(

Agree though. I'm sure they'll put out some long-coat ventile business later in the year.
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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby Sam » Thu Oct 30, 2014 10:22 pm

Finally made it to the workshop (okay, the residence at Vitsoe but it's almost the same...sort of..)

Wow.

Sara and Paul are so extremely nice, was in there for about an hour just chatting with Sara, didn't even buy anything (unfortunately!)

If you're in London and you have the opportunity go give them a visit (if this thread hasn't convinced you already!)

Tried on a shirt + proper trousers in stone twill (hugely impressed with them, going to get a pair soon for sure...)

Really good idea of them to do the residence for the week @ Vitsoe.

It's on Duke Street near Marylebone High Street.
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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby pirxthepilot » Sat Nov 01, 2014 3:10 pm

these guys' knits are the best i've ever handled: softer, thicker and more striking than,say, my SNS Herning stark. I've also chatted to Paul, very friendly and has huge enthusiasm for what he does. strongly recommend a visit to anyone who can make it.
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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby adiabatic » Sun Apr 02, 2017 7:30 am

bels wrote:Add another foot on the length and I'd robocop it. As it stands tho... looks a bit too M&S for my needs. (M&S rules though so don't mess)


What's M&S?
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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby BIGBEE » Sun Apr 02, 2017 12:46 pm

Marks and Spencer

Post ironic dad wear for teens
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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby maj » Sun Apr 02, 2017 3:17 pm

M+S has the single best jean fit of all time
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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby BIGBEE » Sun Apr 02, 2017 4:49 pm

maj wrote:M+S has the single best jean fit of all time


That's a negatory ghost Rider
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Re: S.E.H Kelly

Postby soz » Mon Apr 03, 2017 1:51 pm

All these garms give me 2nd hand itchiness
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