Material Science

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Material Science

Postby bels » Tue Apr 29, 2014 6:22 pm

Are you MENTILE for VENTILE?

Does GORE-TEX mean MORE SEX?

Is WARP officially better than WEFT???

Does the Japanese refusal to do bulk discounts on fabric encourage their niche labels?

Talk about dope blends, waterproof wools, thick mother of pearl buttons etc here.
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Re: Material Science

Postby bels » Tue Apr 29, 2014 6:24 pm

Does anybody own anything in Ventile? I'm thirsty for it, seems like a wonderfabric, waterproof but breathable? Why do we even need Bob Gore?
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Re: Material Science

Postby maj » Tue Apr 29, 2014 6:27 pm

Ventile® was the first truly effective all weather fabric whose breathability performance remains unsurpassed. Its secret lies in the uncoated and unlaminated construction. The fabrics are 100% cotton, utilising the finest, long staple fibres, only found in the top 2% of the world's crop. After gentle spinning and doubling, the yarn is woven into a very dense Oxford weave, using up to 30% more yarn than conventional woven fabrics.

The performance of Ventile® fabrics results from the properties of cotton fibres which expand when they come into contact with water. The combination of fibres, yarns and weave causes expansion in a uniform manner. This allows the interstices within the fabric to close up, preventing the further passage of water.

The fabric therefore provides excellent protection against the wind, rain, snow and cold.


http://www.ventile.co.uk/about.htmlx

Teflon® is the trade name for a polymer called polytetrafluoroethene, or PTFE. It is very slippery, so is used to make non-stick coatings for pans. It is also used in Gore-Tex®.
Gore-Tex® contains layers of nylon, PTFE and polyurethane. The PTFE contains a lot of tiny holes called pores - there are around 14 million per square millimetre. Each one is too small for water droplets to pass through, but big enough to let water molecules from sweat go through. Without the nylon, the layers would be too fragile to be useful.

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesi ... ers3.shtml

http://www.gore-tex.co.uk/remote/Satell ... ur-fabrics
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Re: Material Science

Postby UnwashedMolasses » Tue Apr 29, 2014 6:42 pm

Our Legacy Bomber Jacket, White Tyvek

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Tyvek /taɪˈvɛk/ is a brand of flashspun high-density polyethylene fibers, a synthetic material; the name is a registered trademark of DuPont. The material is very strong; it is difficult to tear but can easily be cut with scissors or a knife. Water vapor can pass through Tyvek, but not liquid water, the material lending itself to a variety of applications.


Tyvek is a nonwoven product consisting of spunbond olefin fiber. It was first discovered in 1955 by DuPont researcher Jim White who saw polyethylene fluff coming out of a pipe in a DuPont experimental lab.[1][unreliable source?] It was trademarked in 1965 and was first introduced for commercial purposes in April 1967.

...the fibers are 0.5–10 µm (compared to 75 µm for a human hair). The nondirectional fibers (plexifilaments) are first spun and then bonded together by heat and pressure, without binders.


From DuPont's website:

Our Tyvek® protective apparel helps protect your workers against small size hazardous particles. That includes particles such as lead, asbestos, and mold. Protection is built into the fabric itself; there are no films or laminates to abrade or wear away.
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Re: Material Science

Postby can- » Tue Apr 29, 2014 7:15 pm

There is a difference between ventile and Ventile(c)

the first is just a cotton woven in the manner described in OP. water won't bead on it and it won't keep you much dryer than the equivalent twill, canvas, oxford, etc

the brand name is a proprietary weave and DWR appliqué combo. this stuff is expensive, will keep you dry, often comes with taped seam construction etc. this is what tilak, stone island, pwvc etc use. the fancy durable water resistance treatment is mostly what's keeping you dry and it will eventually wear in like any dwr.

ventile also takes dyes really poorly and fades quick with wash. something abut the length of the cotton or something. probably why you see a lot of white ventile
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Re: Material Science

Postby kyung » Tue Apr 29, 2014 7:50 pm

Diaplex isn't unlike GORE-TEX in that it is layers of laminated nylon, giving the fabric its water resistant properties. However, instead of many tiny pores within the fabric, diaplex has a solid film applied to it. The material senses the surrounding temperature and adjusts the particles in the fabric to allow more airflow (if it is too hot) or to keep out moisture (it the material senses that it starts to rain).

Called DiAPLEX, this novel material can be used to make comfortable garments that are watertight without
clamminess. To maintain a comfortable environment within garments DiAPLEX is designed to react at a transition
temperature, which adapts the state of the material to variations in the internal and external environment. When,
following strenuous activity or changes in the external environment, the temperature inside the garment reaches the
transition temperature, the material automatically becomes either more waterproof or more permeable to water vapor.


DiAPLEX can be called a material with self-control because it senses changes in the environment and adjusts itself
accordingly to maintain comfortable in-garment condition. In addition to being highly waterproof and effectively
breathable, DiAPLEX also features anti-condensation characteristics, heat retention, wind proofing and water
repellency required in severe weather conditions; while it also has stretchability, durability and a sensitive soft touch
that make it suitable for sportswear.


http://go.hrw.com/resources/go_sc/sp/HP1PE275.PDF

Undercover

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CASH CA

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A. FOUR

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Re: Material Science

Postby UnwashedMolasses » Tue Apr 29, 2014 8:02 pm

Maharishi

Short Flight Jacket & Mao Blazer, Nanosphere Coated & Jasmine Scented

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NanoSphere® is a finishing technology based on nanotechnology that provides a natural self-cleaning effect and an extremely high level of water and dirt repellence. Using nanotechnology it is possible to transfer the non-stick and self-cleaning process of certain plants and insects observed in nature onto textiles. This process specifically alters the surface of the textile with nanoparticles.


Couldn't find anything on how they do the jasmine scenting unfortunately.

Also:

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Mongolian Long Hair Sheepskin (2800 pounds)
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Re: Material Science

Postby JonjoShelvey » Tue Apr 29, 2014 9:21 pm

who designs the cool fabrics that some brands use? like that jasmine scented jawn, or some of the crazy shit SISP does, who designs that? what you think they go to school for to learn that


edit: of course by sisp i mean mainline stone island

Spoiler:
sisp sucks

edit actually just looked at sisp ss14 some cool shirts and jackets. still not as cool as mainline tho
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Re: Material Science

Postby ramseames » Tue Apr 29, 2014 9:36 pm

materials engineering, textile engineering, textile chemistry
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Re: Material Science

Postby bels » Wed Apr 30, 2014 5:58 am

Unlined 60 40 cotton poly outer wear is great.
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Re: Material Science

Postby JonjoShelvey » Wed Apr 30, 2014 12:28 pm

what's great about it? thought about buying a 60/40 m65 and bdus
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Re: Material Science

Postby can- » Wed Apr 30, 2014 1:45 pm

BDU's come in a bunch of fabrics, i think the NYCO blend tends to be 50/50 rather than 60/40 (which is usually not actually 60/40 but something close). can also find summer variants in full cotton or 40/60 poly cotton blends.

as with ventile it's important to distinguish between 60/40 DWR fabrics which is what you find on any kind of sierra/bean/woolrich mountain parka, or uniqlo blocktech parkas (do they still make these)? and normal 60/40 fabrics (usually ripstop) which just offer higher durability and a slightly different handfeel. one will keep you pretty dry in the rain, the other wont
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Re: Material Science

Postby rublev » Wed Apr 30, 2014 3:23 pm

Fabric on this Stone Island jacket is very cool... 'nylon metal tyvek shield jacket'

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:woop:
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Re: Material Science

Postby rublev » Wed Apr 30, 2014 3:42 pm

More Our Legacy stuff... i like what they do with fabric a lot. Always a bit different / interesting... willing to be a bit weird in comparison to other similarly priced euro brands.

'WHITE INDIGO'

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"Each item is first dyed Indigo and then bleached, washed and tumbled until it reaches almost white again. As a result of this process each individual garment has a unique character and faint traces of indigo."

ALSO, this 'raw silk' fabric looks amazing:

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Re: Material Science

Postby bels » Wed Apr 30, 2014 4:04 pm

I don't think any of my 60 40 stuff is dwr but it keeps the rain of OK. Not amazingly though. In serious rain it gives up the ghost pretty fast.
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Re: Material Science

Postby can- » Wed Apr 30, 2014 4:35 pm

if it beads it has DWR
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Re: Material Science

Postby maj » Wed Apr 30, 2014 4:37 pm

@bela on that marioyoshi tip



3xdry

The 3XDRY® functional treatment combines two technologies into one textile: From the textile outside up to the middle it is water repellent, while from the textile inside to the middle it is water absorbent.

This combination enables the Feelgood Technology 3XDRY® to prevent noticeable perspiration marks, to generate a comfortable cooling-effect, as well as to improve dirt and water repellence. Clothes finished with 3XDRY® keeps your body dry over a longer period and even after washing the garment is dry in a flash.


http://www.schoeller-tech.com/en/textil ... 3xdry/#all
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Re: Material Science

Postby bels » Wed Apr 30, 2014 5:03 pm

Feelgood Technology 0069(TM) ACRONYM (gmbh) lube dispersal system patent pending?
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Re: Material Science

Postby maj » Tue Jul 01, 2014 4:33 pm

stone island reflex mat

essentially it's a reflective fabric which then has shards of glass weaved into it which reflect light.





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Re: Material Science

Postby CleanThug » Tue Jul 01, 2014 6:26 pm

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Re: Material Science

Postby Vaeltaja » Wed Jul 02, 2014 12:17 am

I heard that in USA and Europe, the makers of GORE-TEX are very strict on who gets fabrics (something like approved designs), but in Japan, they're a lot more lenient. Is this true? If it is, why?
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Re: Material Science

Postby Metcarfre » Wed Jul 02, 2014 12:57 am

What I DO know is that WL Gore is very strict about how Gore-Tex is used in garments in North America. Since GT is so strongly associated with hiking/climbing/etc gear, GT licensees are required to have their garments pass a system of testing performed by WL Gore to ensure they are completely waterproof. They also, in the past at least, have removed licenses from manufacturers who dabbled in alternative membrane or DWR waterproof-breathable systems. For a long time they had very strict rules about design, too - GT jackets couldn't have detachable hoods, for example.

Whether this holds true in other parts of the world, I'm not sure. Could be one of those complex international licensing situations, like how TNF purple label is entirely separate from The North Face.
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Fiber Optics

Postby blanket » Sun Nov 16, 2014 4:02 am

In this thread: fabric treatments, dyes, cool materials, textile manufacturing processes, 3d printing, et cetera

Everything from alpacas to carbon nanotubes to goretex to indigo to MMMxConverse to spider silk!

Issey Miyake, A-POC - a piece of cloth
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Spoiler:
From designboom
what is 'a-poc' ?
overlength sweaters, dresses off the roll -
'a-poc' is based upon miyake's first design concept, a piece of cloth, is a new and unique suggestion
for everyday life, which goes far beyond the
boundaries of fashion.
it is made using an industrial knitting or weaving
machine programed by a computer.
this process creates continuous tubes of fabric
within which lie both shape and pattern.
the customer cuts sleeves and skirts
exactly to the length he wants.
it is an idea that totally overthrows the existing
standards for making clothes.
'a-poc' is made in a sequence in which thread
literally goes into a machine and re-emerges as
a piece of clothing, an accessory, or even a chair.
this interactive new method not only reduces
leftover fabric but also permits the wearers
to participate in the final step of the design of their
clothing: they determine the final shape of the product.
mass production and custom-made clothing,
seemingly opposing ideas, become compatible with
each other through the wizardry of technology and
the fire of imagination.

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Seamless, by Jessie Scanlon for Wired
The 65-year-old Japanese designer had shown nearly 100 collections and won almost every fashion award in existence. Long admired for his innovation, Miyake had boiled and melted fabric and played with bamboo and ultrasound. He had invented the science of wrinkling and perfected the art of surprise. But Miyake no longer wanted a designer label; he wanted a design lab. Before turning his eponymous line over to a protégé, he sent one final zinger down the runway: 23 models wearing a single dress. Not 23 dresses sewn together, but a single banner of fabric embedded with 23 dresses - connected like a chain of paper dolls.

Spoiler:
When the runway started to seem like a treadmill, Issey Miyake left Paris for good.

The 65-year-old Japanese designer had shown nearly 100 collections and won almost every fashion award in existence. Long admired for his innovation, Miyake had boiled and melted fabric and played with bamboo and ultrasound. He had invented the science of wrinkling and perfected the art of surprise. But Miyake no longer wanted a designer label; he wanted a design lab. Before turning his eponymous line over to a protégé, he sent one final zinger down the runway: 23 models wearing a single dress. Not 23 dresses sewn together, but a single banner of fabric embedded with 23 dresses - connected like a chain of paper dolls.

It was both a grand finale and a preview: Miyake was leaving to focus on A-POC, an experiment he began in the mid-'90s and turned into an independent line in 1999. An acronym for "a piece of cloth," A-POC refers to both the fashion label and the manufacturing process behind it. That process breaks one of the fundamental laws of fashion physics: cut and sew. Normally, clothes are made by weaving thread or yarn into fabric, which is then snipped and stitched to create, say, a dress. The A-POC method requires no sewing. Thread goes into the loom, the dress comes out. Specifically, a flattened tube of material emerges that contains the finished shirt, skirt, or pants, which need only to be cut out along the faint outline already woven or knit into the fabric. Moreover, the material can be snipped anywhere without unraveling, a feature that allows for complete customization. A pair of scissors and a flirtatious spirit can turn a turtleneck into a plunging V-neck.

Miyake has so far kept the patent-pending process a closely guarded secret. But fashion insiders recognize that the technology behind A-POC - the process of melding thread into clothing, seamlessly - represents an entirely new way of making clothes, one that has less to do with the needles and bobbins of a garment factory than with rapid prototyping methods used in manufacturing. The real effect of A-POC has yet to be felt.

Textile manufacturing has a long history of sparking social and technological change. Joseph-Marie Jacquard's automatic loom, introduced in 1801, caused riots among the hand-weavers it began to displace, and later inspired Charles Babbage's Difference Engine and Herman Hollerith's punch cards. Likewise, the demise of cut-and-sew could have significant impact, allowing manufacturers to save time and money by eliminating work usually done by skilled laborers. "Miyake is weaving garments that don't need to be sewn," says Jack Lenor Larsen, an internationally renowned textile designer, "and that is the wave of the future."

But A-POC isn't just a new way to make clothes - it's a process that can be used to create all kinds of goods. Any material that can be turned into a fiber can work in the A-POC process, which gives Miyake the opportunity to produce anything from shoes to portable shelters. The A-POC team already has developed a series of colorful beanbag-like chairs and sofas that will come to market this year. The studio is also interested in a new corn-based fiber that could be used to construct other types of furniture, and it recently developed a resin-linen blend that a University of Tokyo lab found to be as strong as steel. To branch out, Miyake is looking into partnerships or licensing agreements.

Toshiko Mori, an architect and professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, sees A-POC as a prototype for the future of design and fabrication. "I think we can make houses and building components with this technique in a way that will be both economical and offer enormous design possibilities," she says. "It's a high tech, high design, low-cost solution."

On a hot afternoon in September, Issey Miyake is overseeing the final installation of an exhibition of A-POC clothing at the Axis Gallery in Tokyo. Since leaving the runway, the designer has ignored the inflexible calendar of the fashion world, which demands a new collection be shown every spring and fall in Paris or New York. Instead, Miyake has debuted his 11 A-POC collections whenever he wants, at museums and galleries like this one.

Miyake has always been a maverick. He started the Miyake Design Studio in 1970 with the mission of finding new ways of making things. That has included everything from laser-printed fabric patterns to reinterpretations of traditional Japanese textile crafts. Such experimentation is unusual in the fashion business, where most people make their money by imitating. Many mass manufacturers say they're innovative, but that's mostly talk. "It's the smaller companies like Miyake that have done most of the research," says Valerie Steele, director of the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York. Take Miyake's Pleats Please line, a fashion case study. After five years of R&D, he launched a collection in 1993 featuring pleats so thin the material looked more crinkled than creased. The technique was quickly copied, and Miyake's pleats rippled through Saks and beyond.

For all his innovation, Miyake didn't attempt to move beyond cutting and sewing until 1995, when Dai Fujiwara arrived at the studio. Now A-POC's design engineer, the 36-year-old Fujiwara offers a counterpoint to his mentor's easy charm. He is quiet and serious, with a moonlike face and velvety eyebrows. Miyake is, at heart, an artist moved by the beauty of the human form and the clothes that enfold it, while Fujiwara is a born tinkerer: A-POC's single-form creation process sprang from his mind.

On the lower level of the Axis Gallery, the anatomy of that process is laid bare with structural diagrams, yarn samples on view beneath microscopes, and a 3-foot-long plasticine model of threads, all created by graphic designer Taku Satoh. The stockinglike tube is made of double-knit fabric whose yarns are linked in a fine mesh of chain stitches. If the fabric is cut, the stretchier fibers in the bottom layer shrink, tightening the chain-stitch mesh and preventing the fabric from unraveling. A second model displays what Miyake calls the union - where the top and bottom of the tube are knit together, forming what are essentially seams.

Had this exhibit been staged in New York or Paris during the shows, Calvin Klein would have been elbowing Stella McCartney for a closer look. But here the crowd lingers upstairs near the cocktails and the noise, where Miyake denizens in Pleats Please or A-POC Baguettes mix with hip designers wearing telltale black and extreme eyeware - all unconcerned with the innovation on display downstairs.

Makita Shoten, one of four manufacturers turning out the A-POC line, occupies a cluttered, unremarkable building in Minamitsuru, a small town at the base of Mt. Fuji. Makita was founded in 1869 to make silk for kimonos. But as the small weavers of this region gave way to IT companies, Makita brought its looms into the digital age.

The Miyake studio has been working with this family-owned company for five years to refine the A-POC process, though it has never publicly mentioned the factory by name. So this is a first for Makita textile designer Chiemi Tamura: showing an outsider how the clothes are made. Most of Makita's business involves producing fabric that's sent elsewhere to be sewn into garments or products like umbrellas. A-POC represents just 10 percent of Makita's volume, Tamura tells me, and 120 percent of its angst. "Every time Dai and Issey-san asked 'Could we do X?' and we said 'yes,' they'd say 'Oh, so can you also do Y?'" She laughs. "You never know what will come next."

By now Tamura does know enough to expect what she calls "the notorious yarn attack," when Fujiwara sends Makita the newest yarns to be tested. The Miyake design team searches out fibers and filaments the way other designers hunt for new fabrics. Nearly all of their findings end up in Makita's test swatches. The good, the bad, and the truly bizarre results (polyurethane gauze, anyone?) are returned to the studio, where they serve as a springboard for the next generation of A-POC clothing that will spill out of Makita's hulking Staübli loom.

The machine itself is amazing: Computer-controlled levers move the warp threads into the up or down position according to the digitized pattern instructions, and an automated shuttle pulls the weft thread through a dizzying 200 times a minute. Your eyes can hardly follow the shuttles as they fly back and forth, accompanied by the pounding of an army of needles. Brilliant yellow and pink threads - 12,280 strands - run from an oversize spool toward the needles, which bob up and down like marionettes. And Miyake has figured out how to use it to weave finished clothes instead of fabric. The key to the whole process is the digital Jacquard machine overhead, a loom attachment that automates the weaving of patterns. Instead of using the machine as it was intended, the A-POC team co-opted it to create the embedded seams that make its clothing possible.

In addition, the Miyake studio employs the Jacquard to produce more complex designs and experiment radically with all of the possible variables: the thickness of the thread, the density of the weave, the shape of the garment. The designers are able to specify the placement of every yarn - to make, say, the cuffs of a shirt more elastic than the neck. These details are specified in the pattern data Miyake sends to Makita, where the 0s and 1s become Miyake's patented creations.

"Clothing has been called intimate architecture," Miyake says. "We want to go beyond that." Meaning furniture and building components. That A-POC aims to blur the distinction between fashion line and industrial product surprises few who know him. "He is a true design pioneer," says Sherri Geldin, director of the Columbus, Ohio, Wexner Center for the Arts, which just awarded Miyake its prestigious Wexner Prize in recognition of his impact across creative fields. "I don't think of him as a fashion designer," says Richard Koshalek, the president of Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. "He functions on a very high level with regard to new ideas. A-POC has the potential to transform many design disciplines."

Miyake Design Studio is eagerly pursuing opportunities in furniture and architectural design. Early last year, the Japanese VC firm Taurus approached the studio about the Iso Truss, a patented grid structure to which Taurus had exclusive rights. The Iso Truss, which looks like a woven helix, has a remarkably high strength-to-weight ratio, offering a lightweight, low-cost alternative to traditional building components like wood, steel, and aluminum. The Miyake designers see the Iso Truss as a way to take A-POC's weaving technology to an architectural scale. The studio hopes the results can be used in the construction of pillars, walls, and furniture.

Last spring, Harvard's Toshiko Mori invited Fujiwara to the university to talk about these possibilities. His lecture and student workshop - attended by such design heavyweights as Museum of Modern Art curator Paola Antonelli and Tate Modern architect Pierre de Mueron - explored a range of ideas, from clothing as a form of micro-architecture to the potential of weaving techniques to create refugee shelters, boats, and other structures.

Meanwhile, technologists are interested in weaving computational devices. Ethernet inventor Bob Metcalfe ponders a day when the patterned circuitry of computing devices might be woven from flexible, high tech fibers, instead of etched on rigid substrates. He wrote in a recent InfoWorld column, "Why not sprinkle nanocomputers - smart sand - on substrates of woven power filaments and communication fibers? Imagine a yarn conducting on one side and insulating on the other."

The concept hinges on the ability to precisely control the properties and placement of each thread - something that sounds a lot like the A-POC method. For now, though, Miyake is content to explore new, more efficient ways of making furniture and clothing. But if those experiments are successful, we may see A-POC weaving its way through a broader range of manufacturing.


From Alice Gibberd's MA show. According to Suzy Lau of Style Bubble, she used a "heat-pressed polyurethane yarn knit which meant she was able to raw-cut her garments." Gibberd used to work for COS for a bit, I think. Pictures from RCA, Style Bubble, AnOther
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Spoiler:
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Nekid and Famous Scratch n Sniff
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Alpacas! Taking care of sheep!
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Re: Fiber Optics

Postby maj » Sun Nov 16, 2014 9:36 am

Lovely post, similar topic here if you're lookig for previous discussions viewtopic.php?f=2&t=597&p=31075&hilit=Material+science#p31075
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Re: Fiber Optics

Postby blanket » Sun Nov 16, 2014 10:29 am

Thanks, sorry for the repeat thread u_u
It was one of the more obviously named threads too
i'm so disappointed in myself


Mods, could please you move my post to the material science thread? Thank you
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Re: Fiber Optics

Postby Bobbin.Threadbare » Sun Nov 16, 2014 11:53 am

This is my day job!
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Re: Material Science

Postby bels » Wed Jan 21, 2015 2:15 pm

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Re: Material Science

Postby can- » Wed Jan 21, 2015 2:49 pm

585 we out here !!!!
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Re: Material Science

Postby bels » Tue Sep 22, 2015 4:10 am

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Anatomica Ventile Parka. The Waterproof, Windproof and comfortable Gore-Tex Ventile Parka evolves every season into one of the finest constructed parkas on the market. Inspired by those worn by the US Army in the 90s they're made from a Ventile outer, Gore-Tex layer and a nylon backing. Coupled with double zip around the waist and taped seems it all adds to its pristine finish and overall aesthetic.


Ventile, with Gore-Tex and a nylon backing.

Spoiler:
taped seems
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Re: Material Science

Postby ramseames » Tue Sep 22, 2015 10:27 am

Buzzwords

Spoiler:
Seriously though wtf at someone thinking that would be a good idea
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ramseames
 
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