Welcome To: The Interzone [RAF SIMONS]

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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby germinal » Thu Oct 10, 2013 9:29 am

interview with one of Raf's best friends; his assistant during his best period:
Opening Cermony wrote:240 Months of Belgian Fashion: Exclusive Collages by David Vandewal at OCNY
by ALICE NEWELL-HANSON
David Vandewal's collages were just a myth before we called him up for confirmation earlier this year. David is now a freelance consultant and stylist based in New York. But his resumé includes eight years on the design team at Dries Van Noten in the 90s (during which time the designer launched his first womenswear collection), before he left to join his best friend, RAF SIMONS, to help relaunch his eponymous line in the early 00s. There were rumors that throughout this time David had kept fastidious records of every show, appointment, and shoot on the wall calendars he hung in his kitchen. And that the calendars had become shrines to Belgian fashion.

As it turned out, this was all true; David has been making the calendar collages for himself for years. So with the Royal Academy turning 350 and Opening Ceremony celebrating its YEAR OF BELGIUM, we decided it was the perfect time to invite him to do a special project for OC. Now at our downtown New York shop is an incredible window display by David, as well as a series of framed Belgian-inspired collage pieces (retailing for $2750 at OCNY)––made just for us! Below, read up on David's time in fashion, and get a closer look at his OC-exclusive collages and some of his early calendar works!


Alice Newell-Hanson: I don't know where to begin—there's so much to look at—but could you start by telling us about your first calendar?
David Vandewal: I think 1993 was the year of my first collage. It was right after I graduated from the Royal Academy in Antwerp. In our home, we had this cheap kitchen calendar. My first one, if I'm not mistaken was Pamela Anderson or Christy Turlington.

Very appropriate for the time.
Yeah! I'd mark, you know, my doctor's appointment on it, a Dries Van Noten party, some techno thing. Now, in the laptop age, that sounds really stupid, but that's what you used to do! I was dating Peter Philiips at the time, who I'd met at the Academy, and we were this creative couple living together.

Did Peter add things as well?
He didn't, but I wrote his jobs on there. His first-ever jobs are recorded in the early calendars. And it's mixed in with everything else I picked up on in those years. It was that Björk moment, when everything was very eclectic. So we started collecting things. I worked in India a lot so I began to glue pictures from my travels on there, over Christy and Pamela, and it turned into this extreme [collection]. I did this every year, and at some point I eventually stopped hanging the calendars but I kept on [collaging] them because it was like writing in my agenda. Over the years, the writing gets smaller and goes away and everything gets more abstract until it's just pictures, pictures, pictures. And I still do it today. There's one for 2013.


How do you pick which images go into every month?
It's everything I'm attracted to, I'm obsessed with, or I think is happening that month, and also just pictures of ridiculous fashion. I very much believe in the [power] of music, art, artists, any phenomena––to influence each other. Sometimes I see something and think, "This is going to change the whole fashion industry." I'm like this magpie, obsessed with these things, and then it turns into all this and it starts coming alive, and most of the time it turns into trends and goes far. Early Rihanna pictures, early Ryan Gosling pictures... I could show you Ryan Gosling from 2005. Before people knew who he was, I was already like, "Watch that one!" [Laughs].

What's your collaging process like?
I've never done it to a book, but I have no respect for magazines. The minute I buy a magazine, I already have a picture ripped out. I just treat them as these things of consumption. I have a huge archive of things that I like. I rip out like twenty pages of a magazine and the rest I don't need.

What are your favorite magazines?

Anything from New York magazine, to Vogue, Vanity Fair, and Dazed & Confused. I pull from anywhere, high or low.

It's incredible that you have this really detailed record of your entire career. What were you doing at the time you started your first calendar?
It was 1992 or 1993, and I got picked up from my graduation class by DRIES VAN NOTEN, who I think happened to be in the jury and was looking for a team of creative assistants. He was not really that big at that time, and he never worked with creative assistants. But he picked a few kids: me, An from AF Vandervorst, and another girl. We were the first Dries Van Noten creative team. At that moment in time, he started focusing on a women's line because he started with menswear.

Did you work on that first women's collection?
We were all involved in the first women's show. It all started with these famous old-school tea roses that later became fashion history. It was so not the coolest thing to do at that time, English tea roses—so that's what we chose as the print. He wanted to do it as a statement; it was Belgian anti-fashion. The first three seasons were primarily based on old tea roses and those gorgeous prints made by the fanciest printers, all based on these old-school flowers, and it turned into a trend.

Dries' runway shows are always incredible. Can you describe the first womenswear show?
It was at the Hotel George V in Paris and it was kind of Indian-inspired, with Elvis music—"Love Me Tender." There were white Indian pillows on the floor. But it was the 90s so it was grunge and it was Emma Balfour and Sarah Murray in these rose-printed silk dresses and slippers.

I loved working at Dries. We were these few people that helped him out early on—all of the prints and hand-embroidery were all executed by me. So then eight years later, when I left and I looked back, there was this design team of twenty or thirty people, technicians, maybe thirty people, and we'd moved to a huge office. It was a really good feeling.

Still today, from everything I hear, the office still has a very family-like atmosphere.
Absolutely. I have the deepest respect for Dries. I was really pampered there, because he's such a good human being. I learned so much from him—skills, discipline, taste—and I only have amazing things to say about him.

When did you decide to leave?
My best friend at the time, who comes from the same small village as me in Belgium, happened to be Raf Simons. And suddenly he made that men's collection that changed the whole industry, you know that skinny kid, David Bowie suit moment. So I decided that after eight years at Dries—in the year that Raf closed his label for one season and revamped his whole team—that would I leave Dries and restart Raf Simons with him and his muse Robbie Snelders. I went from one extreme of Belgian fashion to the other. I was such a fashion victim and so obsessed with fashion that for me, it was just a cleansing experience. I dropped all the embroidery, all the gorgeousness, and went straight to plastic [Laughs].

Did you take a break in between?
In June I was still prepping the Dries Van Noten men's show, and then in July I started at Raf Simons.

What was your role in the team?
I was the only other team member. We had Robbie, this kid who was Raf's muse, doing the more administrative stuff. Then it was myself, Raf, and an intern. That was it. And we made this big comeback in 2001.

What's your favorite Raf show of all time?
The Virginia Creeper show. It was a very Steven Klein-inspired show about American serial killers and poisonous plants. It was held inside a garden; it looked like a terrarium and then we had these guys in plastic ponchos and stuff walking around. Like these bad serial kilers you meet in the forest, woodchoppers-slash-serial killers from American horror movies. Raf had a big fetish for American culture. One of Raf's favorite movies today is still Jeepers Creepers.

Do you miss being affiliated with one house?
Not at all. I think it's my moment. I was always dedicated, contributing to the people that I worked with and I never had the idea that I want to do this for myself. You know how people dream about their name on the wall and a label, I never had that. I only could really get excited over "I'm going to help Dries make this amazing" or "I'm going to help Raf." I had this kick, and that was the fire I discovered to be my strength. I'm a pretty big fashion victim and I think a designer is another breed. Designers are almost more narrow-minded and in their own bubble. And that's why their work looks so unique. You actually need stylists and people involved to shake them awake.

Belgium in particular has bred so many of that type of person with distinctive vision.

It goes back to the Academy. When I graduated, I was a really good student. They liked me there and I worked really hard. But I have to say I graduated not knowing how a computer works, and never seeing one merchandise list. They're looking for the pure artist. And the dean, and all the teachers there encourage this. That is why I think Belgian fashion stands out so much. Because it can really awaken the devil in you, and what is in you.This is different from other schools where there is a lot of this information given. The pure fashion designer, the pure Galliano, Bernhard Willhelm. I think you can see that.

What was the jizz like at the Academy when you were studying? Was there a scene you were part of?
We were part of this whole big Belgian techno scene––10 Days of Techno in the 90s and all that stuff. My friends were like Willy Vanderperre, Peter Philips, Raf. We'd all hang out and it was all about techno.

But I actually met Raf much earlier because he comes from my village in Belgium. He's five years older than me so he was actually always the grown up; in school he was always with the taller kids, like smoking a cigarette, and I was playing with Legos. I've known him for a long time. But Peter Philips and I met on the first day of school. Like you go to Parsons on the first day and meet these people, and you go to lunch and they become your friends. And there were many more. I keep saying all these glorious names but it was a tight group. And it was a lot of going out––90s sex, drugs, rock 'n' roll. I mean the whole she-bang.

Drop by OCNY to see David's incredible collages and window installation in person!

http://openingceremony.us/entry.asp?pid=8502

click thru for photos, there're way too many
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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby germinal » Wed Oct 16, 2013 9:36 am

decided to do a run-down of my Top 5 favourite Raf Simons collections. Feel free to guess what'll be no 1; make your own lists; play spot Robbie

In fifth place:

A/W 2006-2007

the last great Raf Simons collection. It was at this time he launched Raf by Raf Simons.
27th Jan 2006
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the collection's probably best-known for the accordion-zip pieces, but imo the real joy is in the knitwear and the construction of the outerwear, the skinny suits and turtlenecks and the giant techno outerwear

Raf Simons Menswear Fall 2006: Arch Modernist
By Antony Johns

Raf Simons chose the giant angular arch situated just outside Paris in the shiny business district of La Défense for his latest event as, if truth be told, this was more of a happening than a fashion show.

Glass elevators whisked the assembled – younger, hipper; more consciously stylish than the usual Parisian chic crowd - into the freezing night air to find themselves high above the city in the top of the colossal structure which opened up into a cavernous hall of a room; a concrete and hardwood temple to the contemporary, bathed in a cool blue light.

The monument, mimicking Napoleon’s Arc de Triomphe, was conceived as a metaphor not only for France’s glorious past, but also its innovative, high-tech future. It was ironic then that it was left to a Belgian to show what modernity, individualism and innovation really mean.

Traditional fabrics and cuts seem to be in vogue at the moment but this was a celebration of the avant-garde, Simons looking firmly towards the future with an attitude that was more brave new world than old school gentleman.

The lean black trousers and fitted jumpers which opened the show were conventional enough but were rendered fresh with their horizontal chevron knit and the layered construction of the neckline. The dark matt suits that followed were vaguely reminiscent of the Eighties with their oversized shoulders and skinny ties but what was to come was like nothing else.

The silhouettes of bulky padded overcoats with their large rounded hoods, shinny materials and tight pants gave the feel of futuristic monks as the models marched through the eerie half-light, and hypnotic techno beats replacing the Gregorian chants.

This was the archetypal look, worked on elsewhere with sombre cape-like anoraks displaying interesting engineered details such as telescopic hoods, the dark grey outer skin parting to reveal lighter tones in the mechanical workmanship. Trousers were also extendible, manufactured with zips that gave the option of altering the length and contributing to the industrial ambiance.

In a centralized, conservative country, Simons’ philosophy of post-modern free thinking was like a breath of fresh air and made one wonder when the French will produce a designer capable of matching both him, and the architect of the magnificent setting.
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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby sknss » Thu Oct 17, 2013 9:23 am

found this little guy at the library
Spoiler:
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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby germinal » Thu Oct 17, 2013 10:59 am

in fourth place:

A/W 2004-2005 "Waves" (or: "Life is, in itself and forever, a shipwreck. To be shipwrecked is not to drown. The poor human being, feeling himself sinking into the abyss, moves his arms to keep afloat. This movement of the arms which is his reaction against his own destruction is CULTURE - a swimming stroke...")

This collection for Autumn Winter 2004-2005 explores the idea of conscious confinement and wilful enclosure. Again starting with the concept of an imaginary community outside regulated society, the whole of the collection evokes the feeling of enlightenment and personal enrichment one can find in extreme but self-chosen isolation. The collection references at random various drop-out cultures that are conceived as like-minded tribes but when examined closely, are in fact gatherings of individuals seeking self-fulfilment through lonely practice. Wave cultures, cultures of rave waves and ocean waves. Eyes closed, alone with the music, living only inside music, happily disappearing into the vortex of sounds and emotions. Arms wide open, alone with nature, taking to the sea, drifting away from the short, fully realising the only options are drowning or surviving.


24th Jan 2004

one for the ages

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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby germinal » Fri Oct 18, 2013 4:09 pm

in third place

A/W 1999-2000 ("Disorder - Incubation - Isolation")

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there aren't many pictures, but there is a video that captures what a wonderful show this was


9th season, the collection is shown in a Filmstudio “Studio Carrère” on the Avenue du Président Wilson no. 50 in Paris close to Porte de la Chapelle on Friday 29th January 1999 at 09h30 pm.

A little group of teenagers opened the show, with black flags featuring the following words:

DISORDER INCUBATION ISOLATION

These words are important to describe the image of the collection, and it is also a memorial to Joy Division.

The global idea of this collection is to make a reference to the past, specially the first two parts of the show. Fashion goes so quick that people tend to forget the historical meaning of clothes, especially costumes. This is why the opening of the show was like a procession to create the right atmosphere.

The most important part was a group of models wearing black Capes, classical, asymmetric and circle shapes in ¾ length, a variety of design, an other group wearing ceremonial costumes, shirts with cuffs and collar that are removable. The hair was very constructed in sharp lines. The first three groups had black coloured hair. And in the last part the hair changed to blond coloured hair, but still very constructed hairstyles.

The colour of the outfit changed from black to grey. Raf Simons likes plain, black and monotone, but also he likes the past in contrast to the future. The music was in this part very fast.
The blond group was wearing long light grey and dark grey coats with zippers. The silhouettes are very clean: shirts in classical weaving wool fabrics without collars. Nearly each light grey outfit was with a white “R” Turtleneck and the dark grey outfits with a red “R” Turtleneck.

The music of the show:
1 Placebo - ION
2 Suede - INTRODUCINE THE BAND
3 Ultravox - VIENNA
4 The art of noise - INSTRUMENTS OF DARKNESS
5 The art of noise – PARANOIMIA


Spoiler:
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this season is probably the best example of his tailoring finesse. the cut of the trousers is beautiful. i think it's particularly interesting to compare this collection to A/W 2013 - the clothes are the same in many respects, but the tone of the show is wildly different.
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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby Syeknom » Fri Oct 18, 2013 4:14 pm

Wow, the straightness of the cuts on almost every coat (broad shoulders going straight downwards, no cinching or shape in the waist) mixed with the asymmetry is intense. I like how it's carried through with the jackets and, amazingly, jumpers too.

The video has a really hunting atmosphere to it especially playing the show's music.

Great series this, germ
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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby germinal » Sat Oct 19, 2013 2:16 pm

in second place:

A/W 2005-2006 "History of My World"

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the 10th anniversary collection
29th Jan 2005
9:30pm at Cité des Sciences et de l'Industrie, Espace Condorcet, 30 Avenue Corentin Cariou, 75019 Paris
Soundtrack: Depeche Mode, Simple Minds

A continuation of the future-induced theme, this time in a dark palette. A re-edit of proportions and shapes, with wide pants, cropped jackets, padded coats and tight jacquard knitwear. Tailoring for a new generation.


Spoiler:
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the "all shadows & deliverence / poltergeist" pieces are from this collection too, but they weren't shown on the runway for whatever reason
it was at this time he joined Jil Sander, and, coinciding with the 10th anniversary of his label, he released a Limited Edition capsule collection of remakes of some of his most iconic pieces (e.g. the Joy Division/New Order parkas redone with a Teenage Riot print; the Pyramid bomber redone with the Raf Simons' "Curriculum" on the back etc.)

cathy horyn:
Where the Boys Are Is Where the Girls Should Be

By CATHY HORYN

Published: February 1, 2005

PARIS, Jan. 31 - Only when you see the men's wear collections of Hedi Slimane at Dior and Raf Simons do you realize how inept women's fashion is at reviving itself. The designers of women's clothes receive most of the attention, yet it is squandered on third-rate talents, clichés of femininity, and actresses frightened into submission by silly television frock pundits. If you want to know what's new in fashion, what's exciting, ask the boys.

Mr. Simons and Mr. Slimane, both in their 30's, brought so much energy to the fall 2005 men's collections that they deserve to be seen by a wider audience. That means doing women's clothes. Dior has John Galliano, but LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton, the parent company of Dior, should give Mr. Slimane his own label. Mr. Simons, who is one of the great, underused talents in fashion, would not confirm a report today that he is in negotiations with Prada to design Helmut Lang. LVMH had a chance to put him at Celine, instead of the clumsy Roberto Menichetti. That was a mistake, though maybe not for Mr. Simons.

This collection showed Mr. Slimane at his most confident as he mined the London music scene for both flintstone and androgynous, skinny models, their faces ghoulishly pale except for a slick of black eyeliner and glitter shadow. The look recalled Keith Richards in the early 1970's, but the cut of the clothes - the postromantic flourish of a long scarf or a polka-dot chiffon shirt with a soupy bow under a pinstripe blazer - was as contemporary as any style can be without being a moment too soon or late.

He opened the show with a young man in a pair of tight black jeans with gold stacked-heel shoes and a salt-and-pepper herringbone cape. And as Karl Lagerfeld, who was seated between Kate Moss and Yoko Ono, said afterward, "I don't normally like capes." Well, there are at least a dozen reasons you would avoid a man in a cape. But Mr. Slimane's capes looked right because they were square on the shoulders like a suit jacket and close to the body. Later he showed one in a hand-knit style with long fringe.

He was also a lot freer with this collection, showing suits in different proportions (but also not taking them too seriously) and offering a lot of great individual pieces like ruffled chiffon shirts frayed at the edges and glitter pants worn with glen plaid blazers. Above all, the clothes would look sexy to a man or a woman. As Jay Jopling, the owner of the White Cube Gallery in London, said as the models streamed past in their Byron scarves, "This is how everyone was dressed at Kate Moss's birthday party."

In some ways, Mr. Simons's collection was the more mature of the two. It had the weight of manhood. Mr. Simons called the show, which marked his 10th anniversary in fashion, "All Shadows and Deliverance, History of My World." And it was his history and no one else's, beginning with his sharp skinny suit and now the newer proportion of a cropped jacket and full trousers. To these he added beautiful topcoats in charcoal wool and tweed. And with both suits and slim pants he showed a black, multistrap boot taken from a 19th-century hiking style. It, too, lent a sense of emotional ballast to the collection.

If Mr. Simons's superb spring collection was an attempt to imagine the future in a believable way, this one was about being grown up. "I try to go more and more away from clothes with references," he said. "I used to make collections that were so obviously hippie or new wave. But now I'm more interested in developing an idea and then slowly letting it float to the next thing."

Tailoring and fresh proportions was the big story of the Paris shows. Stefano Pilati loosened the fit of suits at Yves Saint Laurent, adding the extra polish of waistcoats and shirts with French cuffs. In an inventive Comme des Garçons show given at the Bon Marché department store, with Saturday shoppers gawking over the barricades, Rei Kawakubo did tailored suits in sports fabrics like black nylon. They looked especially cool as slim tuxedoes in a matte black fabric with frilly and pin-tucked white shirts. More and more what distinguishes Paris fashion from its sister cities is the individual mind. It is at its most liberated in the wide trousers and battle jackets of Mr. Simons. Who else in fashion has attempted to change proportions so willfully and in a way that at least makes you think about it?

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/02/01/fashion/01dres.html
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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby Syeknom » Sat Oct 19, 2013 2:24 pm

Holy shit, those wide trousers are incredble. The layering too.
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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby bels » Sun Oct 20, 2013 5:40 pm

Super layered trenchoats are great.

RAF tailoring makes me wonder if there's some alternate world where all the bankers/lawyers are wearing this kind of stuff.

Germ not rocking the boat with his no1 pick.
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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby sknss » Fri Oct 25, 2013 6:52 am

i would love to get my hands on this book
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edited by Francesco Bonami and Raf Simons

If we consider the male, female and homosexual as the first, second and third sex, the fourth sex might be that of adolescents. But adolescence is above all a sexually undefined state. Teenagers are not little boys or little girls, and they are not yet men or women. They are part of a parallel, fluid universe in a state of becoming. They belong decisively to the present, but in symbolic terms they are the seeds of the future. Adolescence is also a state of mind, an existential condition with a powerful impact on lifestyles and trends. Teenagers are omnivorous, tireless consumers, careless but at times attentive, easily influenced but autonomous. Off balance between the present and the future, they seem overexcited and at the same time strangely passive. They often give form to their world and their culture in an aggressive manner, but at the same time they are forced to come to grips with the labels, judgments and formulae of adults. Their behaviour patterns are constantly monitored because they represent a decisive segment of the strategy of consumption. Fashion pays particularly close attention to the teenage universe both as a source of flintstone and as a crucial consumer segment, while contemporary art probes, exploits and analyses the myth of the eternal adolescent. This book is constructed with images of fashion, art, music, cinema and the news, accompanied by an anthology of writings that mixes poetry, literature, journalism and research, highlighting the increasing importance of the teenage tribe in a society such as ours, where the inadequacy of sexual and demographic identities is reflected in a violent, contradictory way in the social changes in progress.


some scans
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clickthru 4 more (this dude has some other greats pics too)
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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby germinal » Fri Oct 25, 2013 2:01 pm

i forgot about this sorry

in first place, of course, it's

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A/W 2002-2003 "Virginia Creeper"

26th Jan 2002
9:00pm at Lycée Stanislas, 28 Rue du Montparnasse, 75006 Paris
Soundtrack: Terence Fixmer, Green Velvet, Public Image Ltd

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Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus Quinquefolia) Autumn/Winter 2002/2003. 26th of January 2002, Lycee Stanislas, Paris

The Theme:
The starting point of this collection is the duality of nature. Both soothing and cruel, nature is still not totally conquered by mankind. At the same time the forceful beauty of nature continues to be a fascination, for previous as much as today's generation. Even after centuries of industrial progress, these elements of nature maintain their intrigue, mystery and wonder about them.
Owls for instance are not just birds; their silence and withdrawal is almost inexplicable as is simultaneously alluring.
Vast and impenetrable woods still put fear into mere mortals. Uncharted swamps serve no real purpose but remain the staple of ominous tales and whispered stories. Poisonous weeds (like the Canadian Virginia Creeper of the collection's title) are a wonderful sight to the eye of the beholder while at the same time cannot be touched or eaten. All said subjects, predators, plants and caprices of nature alike, are isolated, almost separated from modern civilisation.
They compose both themes and background of our darker fantasies. It is not surprising, that they keep cropping up in horror movies (e.g. The Blair Witch Project, The Swamp Thing) as well as thriller books. No wonder their splendid, self-contained isolation alludes to a higher, and more pure state of mind.

The Collection:
The colours used in the collection are all derived from nature-related themes: forest browns and nightly blacks, slate greys, leafy greens and snowy off-whites. Just like owl feathers or the shades over swamps keep blending into each other, the silhouettes also have changing hues and colour tones, similar to the notion of camouflage.
Coats are heavy and loose - almost dripping off the body.
Sleeveless padded jackets, hooded, parka-like coats and adventure-style jacquard sweaters are worn on top of each other, to create a 'explorer-of-nature' feel. Certain shapes are tricks of the eye: a 'double' coat, looking like a bomber jacket worn over a long coat, is in fact cut in one piece.
Also referring to the swamp scenery is a surprising bondage theme. Surprising as the bondage look is not used to restrict or confine the body. Instead, thick harnesses of ribbons are 'draped' over voluminous coats and baggy trousers similar to an imaginary safety net.
In contrast to this tribute to nature, there's a fiercely technological side to the collection. Just like nature is brutalised by the intrusion of man, the clothes are equally embroiled in a battle where throwaway plastic - commonly used to produce garbage bags, is thrown into the equation as much as 'anti-nature' materials such as nylon, fake leather, rubber, industrial gauzes, waxed cotton and varieties of plastic, for trousers, ponchos and capes. The metallic shine and hard colour palette (silver, electric blue) of these fabrics, used along quality natural wool and tweeds, create an unusual but intriguing friction.
To complete the story, U.S. collegiate teenage fashion (baseball blousons, sport sweaters) also permeates through the collection.

Text: Peter de Potter

so there we go, not only is this my favourite raf collection it's probably my favourite collection ever. here's hoping something usurps that crown one day
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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby bels » Fri Oct 25, 2013 4:54 pm

yo what. Where was the one with the white scarves and the road flares? This is bullshit. I demand a recount.
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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby Syeknom » Fri Oct 25, 2013 5:05 pm

germ that's an outstanding show, really evocative. The coats, hoods and foul weather gear are hardcore.

These two are very powerful:

Spoiler:
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Thanks for taking the time to put these together! Great format for showing off a designer you love.
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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby germinal » Fri Oct 25, 2013 5:24 pm

that first vest thing is on yahoo now, i kind of want it

http://page2.auctions.yahoo.co.jp/jp/auction/b149178460
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plus some other pieces from A/Ws 02 and 05 at reasonable prices:
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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby odradek » Fri Oct 25, 2013 5:25 pm

i've heard that digi knit is mad uncomfortable
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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby germinal » Fri Oct 25, 2013 5:27 pm

how'd you mean? i have the turtleneck i haven't noticed anything
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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby odradek » Fri Oct 25, 2013 6:52 pm

i don't know, i've never touched it. i just remember reading from several sources that the digicam and the rothko knits were basically unwearable unless you created some distance between you and the knit. if you feel fine wearing it, disregard all other anecdotes.
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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby Syeknom » Thu Dec 12, 2013 7:42 am

Ontwerper Raf Simons verkoopt persoonlijke collectie porselein ("Designer Raf Simons Sells Personal Porcelain Collection")

Translation (my own, not great sorry):

Belgian designer Raf Simons is putting his collection of postwar French porcelain up for sale, including ceramic vases by Pol Cambost on which he based a whole collection. On December 17, the objects are to be auctioned at the Paris auction house Piasa Rive Gauche.

"What I particularly like about this art form is the relationship between simple things - earth, water and fire - which produces exceptional pieces," explains designer Raf Simons in the press file of Parisian auction house .

He is auctioning 99 items, objects include pieces by Georges Jouve and Roger Capron. One of the most important pieces is a sculptural vase by Valentine Schlegel, estimated at between 20,000 to 30,000 euros. Also for sale is a collection of vases from Pol Chambost that inspired his designs for fashion house Jil Sander.

A total of Simons' private collection, which he began collecting during his internship at Walter Van Beirendonck, should yield 300,000 euros. "I've always been fond of ceramics," Simons told The Wall Street Journal two years ago. "It's something romantic. I could see myself sitting in the south of France with my hands in the clay."

"Ceramic is simple," he continued. "Very different from fashion where you need pattern makers, production teams, marketing experts, vendors, and so on just to sell one piece."


Pol Cambost

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Jil Sander (by Raf Simons) AW09

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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby bels » Sun Dec 15, 2013 2:13 am

Why is he selling?
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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby can- » Sun Dec 15, 2013 2:48 am

he saw the no cop thread!

gonna use profits to design a parka for u beladrome
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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby germinal » Mon Dec 16, 2013 5:58 pm

Raf Simons Opens His Atelier—and Shares His Label—to Artist Sterling Ruby for the Most Complete Designer/Artist Collaboration Yet
December 16, 2013 6:00am

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Collaborators Raf Simons and Sterling Ruby

On January 15, Raf Simons will show his new men’s collection in Paris. Except it won’t be his name on the label. Or at least, not his alone. “For one season, the brand ‘Raf Simons’ will not exist,” the designer boldly declares. Instead, he’ll be sharing the billing with Sterling Ruby (below), “one of the most interesting artists to emerge in this century,” according to The New York Times. Same could be said for Simons, of course, but, on the surface at least, that looks like the only thing they’d have in common. Whether painted, sculpted, dripped, slopped, or bronzed, Ruby’s work is extravagantly physical, monumentally messy—or messily monumental. Simons’ isn’t. Extravagantly emotional, maybe, but otherwise a masterwork of purity and precision. But we know that surfaces deceive. Designer and artist are, in fact, a perfectly compatible duo. “We have similar sensibilities that surface when we speak about music and art,” Ruby confirms. “And even before our collaborations, we were talking a lot about textiles.”

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The one-season Raf Simons/Sterling Ruby label

Spoiler:
Those collaborations have included the interior of the Raf Simons store in Tokyo and a handful of outfits from Simons’ first couture show for Dior, which referenced Ruby’s paintings. But this time it’s radically different. “Fashion has a long interest in collaborative situations,” explains Simons, “but what interests me now is to say that this is not just a collaborative thing, not just asking someone in my field to do the knitwear or the bags. This is all the way, all the way. There is not one shirt, one shoe, one sock that is not from our mutual thinking process.”

The challenges such an endeavor presents seem obvious. Geography, for one, when the creative process so physically involves one person based in Antwerp and another in L.A. Simons insists that even if Ruby wasn’t at every fitting, every single decision was made jointly.

Then, on some level, there is surely the issue of dimensionality, meaning the scale of Ruby’s own work versus menswear’s dimensions (there are rumors of a coat composed of seventy-five different types of fabric, which sounds pretty, er, massive). But that was a challenge Simons saw as his own: for the designer to find solutions to technical issues so the artist’s creativity wouldn’t be restricted. “It was less of a challenge than you might think,” Ruby offers. “I have been thinking about my studio as a kind of Bauhaus. In the last couple of years, I have been producing my own work clothes to wear at the studio, work shirts, pants, and jumpsuits. They are made from bleached denim and canvas, materials that I also use to make some of my artworks. In my work I have been thinking about the moment the utilitarian object becomes an aesthetic object.”

The last Raf Simons collection for men offered a shiny Warholian pop/art vision of the evolution of product in a synthetic world. This one promises the polar opposite: do-it-yourself handcraft dewed with the sweat of an honest workingman’s brow. That hypermasculine image is very much in keeping with the spontaneity and physicality of Ruby’s work. “But what shouldn’t be forgotten about the rawness of Sterling’s work is that it’s about someone who takes complete control as a person and an artist,” Simons points out. It’s a paradox he explored in his own early work, when his designs twisted the raw DIY ethos of the punk, new wave, and electronic scenes he loved into intensely disciplined dissertations on youth culture. Those days—before everything got so much more “industrialized,” as he puts it, for him—have been on his mind a lot lately. “When you’re thinking about a new collection,” he says, “your own history is very much in your thoughts.”

Even before the collection is subjected to the jury of public opinion, the experience has had a transformative impact on its protagonists. “Very liberating,” says Simons. “I know this independence is what people like most about my brand.” For Ruby, it’s been an education in the unholy speed of the fashion industry. “It seems like an endless cycle for designers, and they make decisions so fast,” he says. “I am thinking about how I could incorporate that kind of immediacy into my own work.”

Simons is keen to underscore once more the essence of the project. It is not a simple collaboration, a case of a designer bringing in an artist to create a T-shirt or a bag. But nor do the creators want what they’ve done to be perceived as art. January 15′s show space has been carefully selected so that it couldn’t possibly be construed as an “art” environment. (This from a designer who showed last season at Larry Gagosian’s newest Paris gallery.) “We are making a men’s fashion collection, not an artwork,” Simons insists.

But logic is equally insistent. With the Simons/Ruby collection being one of the most attractive and fully conceived offspring of fashion and art’s courtship, there will undoubtedly be people who prefer to hang the clothes on their walls. Simons is typically unfazed. “As much as we feel free to do this, anyone who buys it should feel free to do whatever they want with it.”

—Tim Blanks
http://www.style.com/stylefile/2013/12/ ... ation-yet/

Raf is obviously too busy at Dior to do anything at his own label
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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby germinal » Tue Jan 14, 2014 6:56 pm

i hope everyone's got their diet coke ready for tomorrow!

ss14 campaign:

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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby bels » Wed Jan 15, 2014 9:00 am

See majax copping one of those polo skirts in short order
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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby raags » Tue Jun 03, 2014 9:59 pm

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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby raags » Tue Jun 03, 2014 11:10 pm

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Designer and all round fashion king, Virgil Abloh has his own loyal following (holla, Kanye West and A$AP Rocky) but he's swooning over a fashion guy all of his own. The designer, like so many others, is obsessed with the work of Raf Simons — Dior's mastermind and the closest thing fashion has to a god.

Abloh has officially come out of his Simons-addiction closet in a Vogue interview. The designer has been keeping a keen eye on everything Raf Simons-related for roughly 10 years and it was Simons' "intellectualized view of current culture," and his reality-based approach to fashion that first drew him to the designers' early work. Over the years Virgil Abloh has fuelled his infatuation by hording anything of Simons' he can get his hands on — as in garments, not old tissues or anything.


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"I have a fishtail parka from 2003 that was part of the 'Closer' collection, which Peter Saville did all of the graphics for. There's a series of fishtail parkas in that, but there's one that stands out, and that's the one I found on a Japanese auction site," he said. Sounds like he really knows where to go for the best Raf merch. How does he do it? "You have personal conversations with people close to him to find out about archive sales."

He continues, "They happen once a year or so. I've befriended the woman who runs those. And then, there have been samples that were loaned out and never returned. So you hear about these mysterious pieces that Raf doesn't even have! I have an eBay alert on my phone for Raf pieces. And then there are Japanese proxy sites where I've gotten most of my key finds."


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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby Yoder » Thu Jun 26, 2014 2:51 am

finally read all the way through this thread after maj linked it, and wow. It makes me feel something else, the cultural impact and the art. Not really sure how to express my thoughts on this one, besides finally feeling like i've truly gotten "fashion". (which is a misnomer in itself, as knowledge shouldn't be the goal necessarily but rather understanding and feeling)


Thanks to everyone who has contributed in here.
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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby germinal » Wed Jul 16, 2014 6:19 am

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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby stappard_ » Wed Jul 16, 2014 7:24 am

the pocket details on the shirt are v amusing

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what does one store in such a small pocket?

a single coin?

a glacé cherry?
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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby vgtbls » Wed Jul 16, 2014 7:35 am

A small mouse friend?

Emergency pasties?

The jeans are cool but not really unique in a way that I can pick up on. Am I missing something with this?
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Re: Welcome To: The Interzone

Postby oucho » Wed Jul 16, 2014 9:33 am

vgtbls wrote:A small mouse friend?

Emergency pasties?

The jeans are cool but not really unique in a way that I can pick up on. Am I missing something with this?

I don't know if you noticed but they have some yellow paint splats on them
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