De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Yoder » Tue Apr 07, 2015 3:21 pm

raf would take public transit for the inspo
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby bels » Wed Apr 08, 2015 2:52 am

raf seems like he'd elegantly shrug when he gets caught in traffic for 3 hours.
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Mon Apr 13, 2015 3:04 pm

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Kate Moss modelling a couture dress and the bridal toile for W Magazine
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Mon Apr 13, 2015 5:52 pm

Yeah it's the same mohair dress in both

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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Thu Apr 16, 2015 6:11 pm

Oh shit, Antwerp stock sales are happening next week - I had no idea

Overview + details

Dries, Schneider, Jan-Jan, Ann, Margiela, Haider.... No Raf this time around though which is a pity.

Must rush to take a day off and move some money around for this.
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby bels » Thu Apr 16, 2015 6:27 pm

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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby PrimePrime » Fri Apr 17, 2015 3:13 pm

New documentary about Martin Margiela comes out tomorrow!

Here's an interview with the director: http://nymag.com/thecut/2015/04/director-of-a-new-margiela-doc-on-his-genius.html.

Here's the film's site with a trailer: https://tribecafilm.com/filmguide/artist-is-absent-2015.
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby ramseames » Fri Apr 24, 2015 2:48 am

Margiela fw91

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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby bird.in.flight » Sun Apr 26, 2015 8:36 am

last day for jan jan's stock sale (andresen too) for anyone interested

https://instagram.com/p/1xsDBUipk0/?tak ... op_antwerp
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Sun Apr 26, 2015 8:59 am

I went on thursday and there were only about 4 pieces left for Jan-Jan, not especially worthwhile (though the shop itself is). The rest of the stock sales in Antwerp were better (Margiela's was a colossal waste of time)
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby ramseames » Mon Apr 27, 2015 2:01 pm



http://www.yoox.com/project/theartistisabsent

this came out today at midnight, haven't watched it yet
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby bels » Sun May 24, 2015 12:45 pm

Grebe Can Broken on fake concepts:

For me, if you want to make dreams, make haute couture and show it without pretending that you’re doing something that people can find afterwards even though you don’t sell it. For me, that’s not right. I really want to show reality, not some kind of theory, like, “This is the way that fashion could look like, but you’ll never be able to get it.”
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby qalandar » Sun May 24, 2015 1:26 pm

ramseames wrote:http://www.yoox.com/project/theartistisabsent
this came out today at midnight, haven't watched it yet


This is not bad, nothing new in it but worth a watch if not yet seen. and too bad raf doesn't heed his own advice :idea:
(although raf dior >>>> kva dior)

I did not find these posted here. Apologies if repeat. While not part of the Antwerp 6, the man purported to be Martin Margiela--of whom very few pictures exist--shown here working as an assistant to Jean Paul Gaultier who praised him as one of the most talented people he’s ever worked with.
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ARTE documentary FASHION !
Spoiler:
[vimeo]http://www.vimeo.com/51898745[/vimeo]
[vimeo]http://www.vimeo.com/51908409[/vimeo]
(there's supposedly a part 3 but I can't find it...)
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Sun Jun 07, 2015 9:09 am

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Maison Martin Margiela autumn—winter 1994—95. Garment from a doll’s wardrobe enlarged 5.2 times to human size.

Margiela may be an avant-gardist par excellence, but he finds flintstone in the past, reusing old clothes, as well as doing traditional couture work.

Margiela is fascinated not only by the structure of the garments, but also by their history. His extensive use of ‘recovered’ items in his collections has earned him the ‘grunge’ label. Recovery challenges the authenticity of the creation. His ‘flea-market style’ is, in fact, a sophisticated study of traditional tailoring. The difference between Margiela and grunge is that he does not take up old clothes indiscriminately, but does something with them: he recycles them. Margiela restructures the form of the pieces with cut-outs or darts, and dyes them to change colours and patterns. He gives the old, rejected and condemned clothes a new life. Old clothes have an emotional meaning for him, they are witnesses of the past, of life itself. The fact that the ‘new’ old clothes are not always finished (an unsewn hem or a frayed seam) is intentional, because what is unfinished can continue to evolve. The effect is extremely powerful. ‘Recovered’ clothes have an intrinsic value. The garments are unique items — pièces uniques — works of art. That is reflected in the melancholic, untraditional fabrics and the subtle harmony between the materials, colours and light. ‘Pièces uniques’ belong in haute couture and in that sense Martin Margiela comes (very) close to haute couture, even though his is a ‘dissident’ approach.

His passion for old clothes is so extreme that he creates replicas. He observes the exact proportions, sometimes even disproportions of old, hand-made and made-to-measure garments. In that way the deceased wearers of the clothes live on to some extent. He calls replicas ‘reproductions of a series of old garments’. Martin Margiela sees the replicas as ‘original’ pieces, not as designer reinterpretations, as is the case with recycled clothing. As a fashion joke for his Winter collection for 1994-95, he made replicas of Barbie clothes, but enlarged 5.2 times, to human proportions. He adhered to the same sleeve details, finish and relative size of the press studs. The result was a somewhat disconcerting silhouette.
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Sun Jun 07, 2015 9:14 am

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Maison Martin Margiela spring—summer 1999.

HANDCRAFTED PIECES. Raw finished vintage denim waist-coat and customized jeans with random patches. T-shirts and shirts printed with their own photographic image.

Presentation:
6 rue Fèrou, a large abandoned private house at Place St Suplice in the 6th arrondissement of Paris. The official ‘calendar’ of shows, sent to journalists by the French Chambre Syndical of Haute Couture and Prêt a Porter is stamped and used an invitation. The invited public fill the first two floors of the house. All shutters on the windows and curtains are shut to the outside world. Only the existing light bulbs, hanging on a wire from each ceiling, light each room. The sound and conversations of the public on the first floor are broadcast to the public on the ground floor and vice versa. While the public waits for the show to begin, men in white coats, wearing ‘sandwich boards’, walk in procession through the rooms. Poster size photographs of garments from ‘6’ are printed on each sandwich board. Fifteen men wearing garments from ‘10’ follow them. When all twenty-five men leave the space, the lights go out, and the invited public stands in darkness. Forty women wearing the collection begin their procession, one at a time, through each room. As each woman enters a room they are flaxy by small lights hand-held by a team of fifty-four men spread throughout the house. As they move through the room their light follows them and goes out as they leave the room. Each woman smells of patchouli oil. A soundtrack of heavy rock music plays over the sound system. For the finale all of the forty women and twenty-five men, pass through the crowd.
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby kafkaontheshore » Sun Jun 28, 2015 4:22 pm

I went to Antwerp for 48 hours with my son Theo last week -- highly recommend the Dries show at the MoMu (Mode Museum), which has pieces from his archives along with the art and other tangible influences on his decades of design. The Dries flagship store, the Het Modepaleis, is right down the street in a gorgeous 19th century domed triangular building.
Antwerp is great for walking or biking with Velo-Antwerpen, the city's bicycle sharing system (the cars and pedestrians give way); my favorite trip was in a pedestrian-bikes only tunnel under the Scheide river (the vintage wooden escalators are fantastic).
The bikes are also helpful to get to Ann Demuelemeester's flagship store (a 10-minute ride from the city center) in a spare and modern space (a contrast to Dries's), where some pieces from previous seasons are deeply discounted. Also away from the city center, so the bikes are useful, is Atelier Solarshop, a store curated by Jan Jan Van Essche and his partner -- the only place to find his designs in the city. We found a leather satchel and antique little green-glass bottle. We also liked DVS's second-floor shop with a good collection of Walter van Beirendonck.
Then there are the quality vintage shops, including Labels, Inc.where we found a BLESS t-shirt (for Theo) and CDG jacket(for me) for 150 euros combined -- not to mention great coffee shops on every charming street (we especially liked Abol, right near the Cathedral, where the Ethiopian coffee is fantastic).
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby kafkaontheshore » Mon Jun 29, 2015 6:01 am

@sknss thanks, I do appreciate the interest interest, but the site is not yet letting me post photos. I will as soon as I am allowed (though I don't know how to reach that marker).
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Iliam » Mon Sep 07, 2015 7:48 am

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Album Link: http://imgur.com/a/CeP79
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Fokken » Mon Sep 07, 2015 9:15 am

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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby blanket » Tue Sep 08, 2015 12:17 pm

Dazed, 2014
The Secret History of Walter Van Beirendonck's Invitations
'Is Walter an alien? Who killed fashion?' – We take a closer look at the rare printed ephemera from the Belgian designer's archive

A strong graphical output and even stronger subversive statements have been at the core of Walter Van Beirendonck’s world for almost three decades. As we explore rare and never-before-seen printed ephemera from the designer’s archive, Walter looks back on his five boldest designs.

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Walter Van Beirendonck 'Walter Worldwide News', 'Fashion is Dead!' Newspaper Invitation for Presentation SS90 Collection
Photography by Ronald Stoops, taken from 'Belgian Fashion Design', edited by Luc Derycke and Sandra Van De Veire, published by Ludion in 1999

"This is the cover of the newspaper I made as an invitation for the 'Fashion Is Dead Collection' (SS90). It included a series of interviews with my longtime collaborators Inge grognard, Ronald Stoops, Paul Boudens, Anne Kurris, Elza Arras, and also a series of fake stories such as 'Is Walter an Alien?'. I also presented a fake perfume, 'EXCESS = his Master's Choice', which was a bottle (made by Raf Simons – also the mask on the cover is made by him – who was interning at that time in my studio). My dog Sado is on the top of the bottle and on the fake publicity image. The 'Fashion is Dead Collection' was my reaction to the fashion-system. I was very disappointed with the lies and difficulties of working in fashion."

continued in spoiler
Spoiler:
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Walter Van Beirendonck King Kong Kooks Comic SS1989
"This cartoon-album was in fact a comic book I made, and which was presenting the collection in looks and drawings by the famous Belgian artist Jan Bosschaert. I made the stories (it was all about the grey people fighting the colorful people, with the kidnapping of my dog to put pressure on our gang. I created characters as The Warrior (me!), The Rock and The Snake all featured in clothes from the Summer Collection 1989, 'King Kong Kooks'. The story was situated in the city of Antwerp and the Antwerp Six (other five) have a cameo-role in the comic-book."

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Walter Van Beirendonck Sexclown invitation SS08
"The 'Sex Clown Collection' is inspired by the sculptures and masks from The Bozo people of Mali in West Africa. They make beautiful and brightly coloured marionettes, sculptures and masks with animal hats which I collect. Also the hats (made by Stephen Jones and on the cover of Dazed) were inspired by this tribe."

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Walter Van Beirendonck Hardbeat invitation AW89
“This is a cassette invitation for my 'Hardbeat AW98 Collection'. Real Man was a New Beat group from Belgium and the song “Masters and Slaves” was especially made for this invitation.”

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Walter Van Beirendonck Supernatural invitation SS05
"This was an invitation for my SS05 show. Another tribe I love a lot are the Hopi tribe from America, they make fantastic 'dolls' (mini-sculptures) representing their gods called Kachinas. This invitation explains how to make a Kachina starting from a cardboard toilet-roll. I also did workshops with children making kachina dolls which was really nice."

More!!
Spoiler:
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Walter Van Beirendonck Pixydust invitation AW03

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Walter Van Beirendonck Futureday invitation SS04

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Walter Van Beirendonck Cloudy Stars invitation AW04

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Walter Van Beirendonck Weird invitation AW05

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Walter Van Beirendonck Relics invitation SS06

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Walter Van Beirendonck Stop Terrorizing Our World invitation AW06

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Walter Van Beirendonck Skin King invitation AW08

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Walter Van Beirendonck eXplicit invitation SS09

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Walter Van Beirendonck Glow invitation AW09

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Walter Van Beirendonck Wonde® invitation SS10

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Walter Van Beirendonck Cloud #9 invitation SS12

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Walter Van Beirendonck Lust Never Sleeps invitation AW12

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Walter Van Beirendonck Shut Your Eyes To See poster AW13
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Fri Sep 11, 2015 6:45 am

Putting Together the Antwerp Six: Geert Bruloot

The Antwerp Six, as told by Geert Bruloot - the mastermind behind the most important group of Belgian designers in history.

Geert Bruloot does not sit calmly when he speaks. His hands make great gestures when he talks about the Belgian economy, slavery, or the essence of having a philosophy when deciding to make a career out of fashion design. He switches off his phone when it rings with the same enthusiastic energy as with which he chats. It’s present even when he, every once in a while, pours himself a glass of water, sitting in the top-floor offices of the ModeMuseum in Antwerp, which also houses the Flanders Fashion Institute and the Fashion Department of the Royal Academy of Art.


Bruloot, who founded the Antwerp-based shoe store Coccodrillo in 1984, has curated the upcoming shoe exhibition Foot Print, The Tracks of Shoes in Fashion which will open at the MoMu on Thursday 3rd of September. Many real-life Pinterest mood boards with printed images attached to each category stand just outside of the room where our conversation takes place. Asked about which categories dominate the exhibition, Geert explains: “As seven months is really a very short for preparing this kind of exhibition, we’ve tried to work with what we could get a hold of.1granary_antwerp_fashion_201560 Technically we needed a longer period for chasing loans from the big museums, and conceptually we had to work hard to convince the fashion houses that their past is equally important as the commercial values they are aiming for today. With more time for profound research, we would have gone through the great historical collections of the world, and would have been able to select older historical and indegenousfootwear that has inspired contemporary shoe design.”

With impossible-to-walk-on heels scattered throughout, his moodboards don’t necessarily limit themselves to ‘wearability’. Not that that was the focus, anyhow. “Wearability has never been our first reference. From when we started our shoe store 32 years ago, creativity has always been our goal. When emotion, invention, creation, craft and fantasy can go together with technical development, construction and anatomical research, great fashion creations are born! Shoes can have many connotations: religion, fetish, war, survival, seduction, gender, status, dance, rebellion…”

“I think there’s a bit of an urge today to become a star very soon.”


But before getting ahead of himself and disclosing too much information about Antwerp’s newest hot ticket — after the Dries van Noten’s retrospective exhibition Inspirations broke visitor records — he looks into a different history, close to his heart, and tells us about how he met the Antwerp Six designers and their coming to prominence.

Started from the bottom now we…

In the 80’s, there was Dirk van Saene’s store in Antwerp, called Beauties and Heroes, which is where I met Dirk and his partner Walter van Beirendonck. A few months later, Martin Margiela came into my store, Coccodrillo, which was before he went to work for Jean Paul Gaultier. He said that he had a shoe collection and asked if we wanted to sell it. So I went to his flat to see it, and it was amazing – I bought all of it. Ann Demeulemeester actually came into the store to buy these shoes. A year after that, I met Dries van Noten because I was at that moment also dressing windows for other stores. He mentioned the Golden Spindle contest, and said that they needed somebody to do the scenography and the coordination with the music. He asked me if I wanted to do it. Although I had never done this before, I agreed and made a decor. Dirk Bikkembergs won the contest, whom I met and got into conversation with. “Your shoes are amazing and we want to sell them!” I told him. Dirk said that they weren’t produced, so he went and saw his manufacturer who said: “Ok, we’ll make them but Geert has to distribute them because we have no agent.” So I said, “Ok let’s do this, then.”

“Don’t do it the typical way anymore. Don’t go to Paris with the showroom, because it will not work. It’s too much. Think about a new way.”


During two seasons we were travelling to Holland, Belgium, Luxembourg. All the stores in that time were selling slim mens’ shoes. And Dirk’s shoes were sturdy. We’re talking mid-’80s. Whenever I came into a shoe store and opened a box, it was like poison [for the buyers] and everybody went, “no no no no no! you cannot sell this!” But we were selling them like hotcakes. I was convinced everything was good. After two seasons we went to Tokyo because our trip was paid by the government. I stayed there with the designers and realised the potential of what I saw. I thought, “this is gold”. These designers were so talented, not only in their collections but also in the way they presented themselves: their invitations, the way they built up the stands, the way they built up their shows. I felt everything was there. But you have to see it back in time. We’re talking Montana, Gaultier, Alaia, Comme des Garçons, Yamamoto, Miyake and Kenzo: those were the designers of the moment. Stephen Sprouse was a bit up and down, and then there was Vivienne Westwood— winning and losing. Before that, ready-to-wear fashion was a secondary part of the couture houses. Fashion became closer to reality, which meant that you didn’t have to open a couture house before you could make fashion. Then the Japanese came and they started deconstructing fashion. No more glamour shows with top models, but just models from the street walking between the chairs. It also became logistically and financially more closer to us. Then we had the Belgians; I realised what was happening there, and in that time London was big. You had Vivienne Westwood, Katherine Hamnett, Body Map, Culture Shock and Galliano was just starting out.. So I said, “I’m fed up travelling with your shoes in the countryside. Please, I have one solution: let’s go to London’s British designers show.”

Going global

Dirk said: “Ok, let’s see what we can do”. And then I thought: “Only shoes? No way. I need clothes.” I went to see Walter and told him about our plan. I asked if he wanted to make a collection: “Just join me and we’ll make a stand together.” He said OK. I was already working with Dries at that time… I had helped him to start up by doing the graphics for his brand; the catalogues; the showrooms, the invitations. He heard of it and went: “hey, why can’t I come as well?” Then I had the idea: of course, they all have to come. We all united, rented a truck and went to London to show the collections, and that’s where it started.

In London, all the designers were on the first floor of the building, and we were on the top floor next to the wedding gowns. All the buyers from Barneys, Bergdorf, etc. never went to the second floor — we noticed this on the first day. The next day we made flyers and started distributing them on the first floor, and sometime around mid afternoon that day, we suddenly had Barney’s there. These were the first orders we had. An hour later it was full of press, cameras around: ‘where did you come from? it’s like you came from another planet, we never heard of you! this is so fantastic!’ As they could not pronounce our names, they just started calling us The Antwerp Six.

“ It felt like a pop group splitting up.”


The next season we were invited by the Pitti organisation to show at Pitti Trend in Florence, but we didn’t have money to go. We often sat together at Dries’ place and Walter was always a box of ideas for all these kinds of things and he said: “Why don’t we rent a mobile home?” You know, those trucks you can live in. The day after, we rented two of them which we charged with all the furniture, the collections, the mannequins, the tents, the designers, and we drove through the Alps to Florence. We went and stayed on a camping during that period and started selling there. This was possible back then; you always have to see it in its context.

I think there’s a bit of an urge today to become a star very soon. I can feel this with the students [of the Antwerp Fashion Academy]. But, the Antwerp Six didn’t have that. They had this dream and this healthy naivety to believe in it. They knew that one day they would make it, but that was it. They were sure that what they were doing was good. It went much faster than they had foreseen. And when we became too important in London, the British Fashion Council chased us out. That’s what made us decide to go to Paris.

The British Fashion Council is funded by the British fashion industry, and they thought we were profiting from their system. It was different with Paris, because Paris has always said: we want to be the fashion capital of the world: welcome to the Japanese, Belgians, Arabs. That was the big change. We went to Paris and showed twice as a group, but then Dirk Bikkembergs only did menswear so he had to split to do the show for men; Dries needed a bigger show because he was booming, and so the whole group split up. It felt like a pop group splitting up.

Acting as a collective creates opportunities

“One American journalist wrote: what’s in the tap water in Antwerp? It remained an enigma.”


Since it started, so many people have been asking us the same question: what’s up with these Six? One American journalist wrote: what’s in the tap water in Antwerp? It remained an enigma. Why and how? It is very difficult to explain. I think it has to do with the political situation in the 80s, when the world was changing very fast and we became a global community; where the identity of a small country suddenly saw the possibility to become one of the players in this global story. We saw the future.

When we started with this group of Belgian designers, they were not doing everything only by themselves. There was also this whole entourage of graphic designers, make-up artists, photographers and models. There was no hierarchy. We were working together to fulfil this dream. We were convinced we could make it. But you have to see it back in time. Today it would be much more difficult because of this global playground. Now you can have a next future star designer from Greenland, or from the South of America. They can come from everywhere because the world has opened itself, by the way of the Internet, for instance. Communication — not only word but also image — flies around the world all the time. To start up as a young designer or as a group of designers would now be much more difficult, and it needs a total different approach. I think starting up as we have done in the 80s has become impossible.

“There was no hierarchy. We were working together to fulfil this dream. We were convinced we could make it.”


Moving forward, Geert’s advice for young designers

Don’t do it the typical way anymore. Don’t go to Paris with the showroom, because it will not work. It’s too much. Think about a new way.

A few months ago I walked in New York and thought: there are too many clothes, and there are not enough people to wear them all. When you have 10 stores, 8 of them sell fashion. Paris and Amsterdam are the same. Where can you buy your groceries, and where are the furniture or ironwear stores? Do we have to sell clothing in a store? We don’t know. Maybe young designers don’t need stores anymore? The future is open at the moment.

The classic multi-brand store as we know it is disappearing; it has no reason to exist anymore. The big brands don’t want to work with them; they are interested in stores that represent their philosophy and their image, and reinterpret it. If you see a store like Colette, it adds another value to the image of Fendi. The way it’s displayed; the selection, and the way it’s sold gives a different aspect than how it’s displayed and sold in the Fendi store. It adds to the image and it adds to the standing of a brand. The multi brand fashion store has to be very creative with all of this.

The ease of buying and selling in the 80s and 90s has disappeared and has been replaced by something exciting, on a much faster speed. There are all these young people who make new creations and systems, and we have to discover them, try to pick them up, and present them or give them a place in our work.

“We cannot fake anymore. It has to become a very honest and transparent business.”


It means that the task, or the definition, of the multi brand store has changed completely. Before, it was just a place where you find all these brands, and that was it. But now, they do the work that editors did for the magazines in the past. And, stores like Colette work even more like a magazine as they rent out their windows as advertising. So they’re not only editors, but they also do advertising.

It’s an interesting period. This is how we live it after 35 years and I don’t mind to change it again, because it’s exciting! The big challenge for us [retailers] is how to attract the young people (who are aware that everything has to change) into a store, selling shoes in a classic way. The shoes are still produced, packaged, used, and communicated in a classic way. I can imagine being a young girl or guy thinking ‘oh fuck off with this system! but… I want these shoes’. We cannot fake anymore. It has to become a very honest and transparent business.”

“To start up as a young designer or as a group of designers would now be much more difficult, and it needs a total different approach.”


On the global fashion system and sustainability

I think the whole fashion system has to change. It has no possibility to survive the way it is now. There are too many clothes; there is too much pressure on the environment (the waste is gigantic); the slavery that supports it has to be stopped. I love cheap clothes because it means that the elitism of fashion is gone, people with little money can afford fashion now, but on the other hand it supports modern slavery, so we cannot accept this anymore. All these ethics have to change about fashion. I think we have to go back to ‘less but better’. We’re missing values and emotion. When you go to see a fashion show, it’s all about products: selling bags, sunglasses, shoes, gloves — but where is the emotion? I think not only fashion but also in politics, emotion is coming back. I think it’s the challenge now for young people to find a new system for fashion, for living together in totality. I can understand the big houses, they have built up a big structure on producing and making money, and you cannot just cut and say ‘we’re gonna kick you out and we do something small’. It doesn’t work like this, just like you cannot eliminate the car industry. We all know that cars are bad for the environment, but you cannot just cut it out. I think a new system has to be invented and the big companies should adapt to it, or help realising it. Fashion designers have to rethink the ways in which they will design fashion.

On the importance of pre-collections and the over-exposure of clothes

Fashion has created the pre-collections and they are easiest for the stores to work with, because they are less visible on the internet; the delivery is early and we can make the customer discover the product in the store. It’s much more diversified. The fashion collection is the message of the show, while the pre-collection has many more sides. It’s been like this for 20 years. When pieces has been in a campaign, our customers didn’t want it anymore, and it’s still like that today. The fashion comes much later, so the time for selling it is much shorter. A shoe that has been seen in the campaigns six months before feels already worn when placed in the shop. It’s old already. That’s where the system is wrong.

“The time of doing whatever is over. There is too much whatever.“


Normally, we should think that the fashion part comes first, but if you go to the shows now in September for next winter, it means they have to deliver it in November or the end of October, which is almost impossible. This is one thing that’s wrong. The other thing is how the systems in the different price levels is killing the fashion system as we know it. One of the most important turn-overs for Prada stores are the outlet stores. The real price becomes the outlet price for many customers. We’re at the point where customers say: this is overpriced. The system has to change.

Attending fashion shows today

For the past ten years of going to fashion shows, I’m rarely excited, because I have the feeling I’ve seen it all. We cannot possibly have seen it all. I think the art or all forms of creation should always trigger some part of our sensibilities, but in fashion I’m not excited at all at the moment.

I’m a fan of JW Anderson — his work is very interesting because he thinks out of the box in fashion, which attracts me. I don’t know yet, but it’s interesting to see Simone Rocha, but I don’t know her attitude towards fashion in general, her philosophy.

“I think we have to go back to ‘less but better’. We’re missing values and emotion.”


Dries Van Noten and staying true to your design philosophy
Overexposure was something he never allowed with his collections. He never did advertising. All his stores look different. You can see his fingerprint, but they’re all different. And he still tries to bring emotion; you still see people crying at his shows. He’s booming, and the only thing he does is slowing it down all the time. He doesn’t want to become the new Armani. He wants to stay as he is. He wants to grow, yes, but his philosophy has to remain. The philosophy of a fashion designer is very important. Martin Margiela has explained that what he did was a proposition for fashion. He did not want to rule fashion. He said, “What I do is my proposition.” Sometimes there was no show, and he would say, “it’s because I didn’t invent anything this season, I had no flintstone, so no show this season.” Then after twenty years he stopped his work as a fashion designer because he thought that his time was over and he had become old-fashioned. That’s a philosophy and that’s important. You can translate a philosophy into a message, and the customer is sensitive to the message. With J.W. Anderson I can already feel a philosophy. The time of doing whatever is over. There is too much whatever. I went to the fashion show of the academy last week and thought ‘come on! what ever’. It’s beautiful or interesting for my references, but what is the meaning of it? Does it make sense?

There are not enough jobs for all of them. That’s why I think if you want to stand out you need to have a healthy contemporary philosophical approach on the metier you’re doing, with whatever job you’re doing. If you want to become a politician, a scientist, you need this: what am I doing? what am I working at? I think that is a very important factor in evolution today, to make a difference and to make things move forward. Otherwise we’ll invent new things that just create more waste.
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Fri Sep 11, 2015 6:48 am

Highly recommend Geert's exhibition at the MoMu - incredible collection of footwear.

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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Mon Sep 21, 2015 6:21 pm

AW15

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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Wed Oct 21, 2015 5:16 pm

Today was the start of stock-sales in Antwerp so we went hunting for garments of questionable health

First up we got a ticket reserving us a spot in Dries at 12:30 so to kill time until then we did AF Vandervorst

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Dries was pretty good this season - mostly AW14 stuff which wasn't a good season for me as a customer but plenty of other bits too. Didn't get pictures in the blood frenzy sorry.

Next up was Ann/Haider who moved conveniently to nearby Dries at the quay. Also no pictures. Haider stuff was nice but stupid money even in stock sales. Ann stuff was really good but more-so for women then men. Prices were better than expected for Ann but still high.

Then onto Christian Wijnants who I should really post about in this thread because he's rad. Only womenswear but @mellownyellow did well out of it.

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This season also saw Walter doing a stocksale which is unusual so we went but sadly we were five minutes too late to get in. Looked like a huge archive clearance from our brief peek across the threshold so that's a shame.

Lastly in the evening we snuck into the Stephan Schneider sale which doesn't officially start until tomorrow but Those In The Know can waltz right in.

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Almost no customers, had plenty of time to browse everything. Prices are unbelievably good there as always.
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Wed Oct 28, 2015 8:28 pm

Fernando Cabral modelling Dries Van Noten SS14 for Novembre magazine

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Spoiler:
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Crosspost to Casual Tie
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Sun Nov 01, 2015 6:57 pm

Went to Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam this weekend (terribly good museum) where they have a fair few interesting fashion pieces scattered around.

Classic Margiela concepts:

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An Ann Demeulemeester canvas covered table I posted about a while back. Resting on top is a Bless fur wig commissioned by Margiela. In the background, another Margiela classic - the Stockman dress.

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Dirk Van Saene

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These eight crêpe paper cocktail dresses are intended for once-only use. They are sold together in a transparent envelope and each has its own name. The use of crêpe gives the dresses a fragile and unfinished look, as if they have come straight off the drawing board. The paper patterns are not cut out of fabric but are simply made into a dress., At the same time the classic models and the simple palette give the collection a certain timelessness.


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Walter Van Beirendonck

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In the 'BELIEVE' Collection Walter van Beirendonck rejected the cliché of perfect beauty. Inspired by Orlan, the French performance artist, who deliberately deforms her body by means of plastic surgery, and by Victorian paintings containing fairy-tale figures with fantastical body shapes, he made an enchanting collection centring on the reshaping of the body.The body was accentuated in unorthodox ways with corsets, crinolines, special prosthetic make-up, lumps and facial remodelling,


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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Tue Nov 10, 2015 6:48 am

CONVERSATIONS ON SLOWNESS - Dries Van Noten on Avoiding Traps, Trickery and Other Shenanigans (Anja Aronowsky Cronberg)

DRIES VAN NOTEN SPEAKS with care and reserve, like someone well aware of his privileged position in the fashion industry. In Dries’ case this is a standing that has been deftly and meticulously carved over the years, a feat which, in the eyes of many, makes it even more well deserved. For someone who started designing under his own name when few in the business envisioned that fashion could come from Antwerp, let alone pronounce Belgian brand names, the success and rave reviews that Dries is currently enjoying have been a long time coming. Today he is one of the few remaining independent designers, an accomplishment that makes his brand somewhat of an anomaly in the contemporary fashion industry. Nevertheless, Dries, as the designer himself coyly intimates, has to start thinking about his future. Could it be that another of the enduring bastions of fashion sovereignty is about to end up in the hands of a business conglomerate?

Anja: In an interview you once said that ‘The good thing about fashion is that you always go ahead, the next, the next, the next – you don’t have time to look back’. Why is it good not to look back?

Dries: It is good to look back, but I don’t want to be nostalgic. I don’t see the point of dressing up in clothes from the past; there’s a reason why fashion changes with the times.

Anja: But nostalgia seems to have become a very important element in contemporary fashion – why is that do you think?

Dries: People think that things were easier or more pleasant in the past, but that’s not the case. My team and I often have discussions about this. It’s interesting because I’m an older guy now and they are all very young. When we talk about the 1970s for instance, they think about ABBA as one of the icons of the decade. They don’t know that ABBA at the time was considered to be extremely bad taste – vulgar and completely unfashionable. ABBA was still wearing platform shoes when everyone else had already moved on. What I mean to say is that it’s not always the best versions of the past that live on.

Anja: How do you negotiate the conflict between, as you’ve been known to say, there being too much fashion in the world and at the same time, having always to produce more to stay in business?

Dries: I wouldn’t say that I’m completely at peace with this, but I don’t think of my clothes as just more products in the world. I try to do an honest job and make things that have a reason for existing other than just making money. I want to make clothes that allow wearers to communicate something about their personality. Of course I also have to compromise and make basic T-shirts to survive sometimes. But overall, I put my heart in everything I do. I can only hope that this makes my work worthwhile.

Anja: Do you ever have doubts?

Dries: Everyday. I never stop questioning what I do. Before a fashion show I might get nervous and start thinking, ‘Maybe we should have chosen different music, or maybe those shoes aren’t quite right’. But at the same time, if you’re perfectly sure of everything you do, then what’s the point?

Anja: What is success to you?

Dries: Success and happiness are intertwined. To me success is not about scoring, as it is to a lot of people. It’s about feeling good about things, it’s about living a good life.

Anja: How do you apply that principle to how you do business?

Dries: I try to do business in the same way. Had we wanted to, we could have had a store in every major city in the world, but that sort of success was never for me. When we open a store I want it to be in a nice location, I want the staff to be people I like. The most important thing to me is that my work is creative. I want to put all my energy and enthusiasm into colours, fabrics – things like that. I don’t automatically think about whether it will sell well or if I’ll earn a lot of money.

Anja: Is this a strategy that you’ve deliberately followed throughout your career?

Dries: I wouldn’t say it’s ever been deliberate. When I started in the mid-Eighties it became clear pretty quickly that to be a Belgian fashion designer was seen as an anomaly. The other designers from Antwerp that I started out with, well, we realised that we wouldn’t fit easily into the system. We had to find our own way. We had no money, so working together made us stronger but forming a group was never a marketing idea. It was just that people couldn’t pronounce our names so we became ‘The Antwerp Six’. I didn’t set out to be different though, it all happened very organically.

Anja: How do you feel you have changed as a designer over the years?

Dries: I hope that getting older and more experienced has made me wiser. I don’t want to ever fall back on formulas – that’s the worst trap for a fashion designer that’s been in the business a long time. You know, when you follow a tried and tested recipe that dictates adding a little bit of this, a pinch of that, shaking it and hey presto – there’s the new collection. I want to surprise and I want to stimulate creativity in my team – that to me is very important.

Anja: How do you ensure that you don’t fall into the trap?

Dries: The research process is incredibly important. Every season I start afresh – I want us to begin with a blank page, even if where we end up is not far from the last collection. To feel creatively stimulated I need to go through the whole research process – I couldn’t just pick up from where we left off last season. That’s why we aren’t yet part of a big conglomerate. I want to be able to make my own choices.

Anja: Not yet, you say?

Dries: Well, you never know what’s going to happen in the future… I’m fifty-six now, I don’t know what the situation will be like when I’m sixty-five. Maybe I’ll want to stop. But the fact is that I’m responsible for my team and all the people who have invested in us; all the people that work in production are dependent on me. Maybe when that time comes, the best thing to do is to take a partner or to sell the company. I don’t know. But I do know that I’m not going to do this forever – I’m not Armani.

Anja: Why is it important to you that the company remains even if you’re no longer involved?

Dries: It’s not that it’s important for its own sake, but of course it’s nice to know that what I have built will live on. It’s not that I’m looking to leave anytime soon, I love what I do. But I have to start thinking of the future, because I don’t have eternal life. We have to consider our options. In Antwerp we have over a hundred people working for us and in India there’s a few thousand people just working on our embroidery. It would be a pity to just suddenly say, ‘Okay, that was it – bye!’

Anja: Do you worry that your legacy might be misinterpreted, were you to leave it in the hands of somebody else?

Dries: I can pass on my message to the people who continue when I’m no longer here, but I can’t control what happens of course. If I step out, I step out and I have to assume responsibility for my choice. And I still have enough things to do in life that, once that day comes, I won’t always be looking over my shoulder to see what’s happening with the company.

Anja: You often seem to be represented as an outsider to the fashion system: no advertising, no pre-collections, based in Antwerp, independently owned – do you see yourself as an outsider?

Dries: No, because it was never something I set out to become. Every decision we made was based on our circumstances at the time, and my position in the industry is a result of that. It’s all happened very organically. I lived in Antwerp when I started, rent is cheap here. We found an incredible building so why move to Paris? The same logic applied when we found our shop in Paris. My intention wasn’t to set myself apart from the well-established shopping districts, it’s just that we found a shop that I really loved with an amazing view over the Seine.

Anja: How do you see your own role in the behemoth that the fashion industry today has become?

Dries: I don’t know. We’re not the only ones who work in a different way. There are others. But my decision not to make pre-collections like all the major brands do for example, is based on the fact that we wouldn’t have the time to make it as well as our main collection. My team is not big enough. Also, I want to see every yarn, every palette, every button – every element of every collection. That, to me, is the fun part. I don’t like meetings; I like to be hands-on in the creation. But really, we just do the best we can with what we have.

Anja: Are there parts of the fashion industry that you find hard to identify with?

Dries: Actually, I think that the good thing about the fashion industry today is that it allows for a lot of different alternatives. In the Eighties and Nineties there was just one way. In the late 1990s when the big groups started buying up independent designers, it looked for a while as if that was the future – we all had to become part of a big conglomerate. We also considered it seriously for a while. But we didn’t make that leap, it wasn’t for us – or not yet anyway. Instead we just kept working and with time people have come to respect that. Today, difference is celebrated. It’s the same with fashion itself. You can be dressed in Versace or in Yohji Yamamoto and be equally fashionable. There’s a lot more space for individuality today.

Anja: How do you feel about the pace of the fashion system – is there any way to circumvent it?

Dries: I’m lucky in that it doesn’t affect me too much. I get by without the pre-collections that are so essential for many other brands. When pre-collections started to become important, we felt the pressure to make them too of course. But we stuck it out, and today buyers seem grateful that we don’t make any. They spend so much time running around the world buying new collections that they complain about not knowing which season is which anymore. I think they appreciate a little time off.

Anja: I’m surprised to hear you say that. I’ve spoken to so many designers who seem to feel that making pre-collections is an absolute requirement these days. How can you survive without it when so many others seem to think they can’t?

Dries: Well, for most designers the pre-collection is their commercial collection – it’s what they sell. Then they make a ‘fashion show collection’ that is useful in terms of image and gets them attention in the press. The equation, in terms of sales, is usually 75% pre-collection and 25% fashion show collection. The fashion show collection for most designers arrives late in the sales season, but we do it differently. We invite buyers to see us in Antwerp one month before we show it to press in Paris. This means that we can get early orders, which in turn helps us when we place fabric orders with our suppliers. If a fabric won’t arrive on time, we can let our buyers know and they can choose something else instead. All in all, this means that we can deliver a big part of our collection nearly at the same time when others deliver their pre-collections. to make pre-collections like all the major brands do for example, is based on the fact that we wouldn’t have the time to make it as well as our main collection. My team is not big enough. Also, I want to see every yarn, every palette, every button – every element of every collection. That, to me, is the fun part. I don’t like meetings; I like to be hands-on in the creation. But really, we just do the best we can with what we have.

Anja: This pace that you’re describing owes a lot to fast fashion, doesn’t it? It’s as if the fast turn-around that customers have come to expect from the stores on the high street, has also ended up completely altering the way high fashion brands work.

Dries: That’s true. You have to remember that in the past sell-through at department stores was assessed every six months; now it’s done every month. Department stores look at a designer’s monthly turnover per square foot now, so of course if you always deliver new products you’ll have a much more even sell-through. A brand like ours by contrast has a very high turnover for the first three months after a new collection arrives in stores, but that will be followed by two months of slow sales.

Anja: But seeing as you’ve been in business for over three decades by now you’ve also had a chance to build long-lasting relationships with buyers. Would it be fair to say that, as a designer who is very well established and well respected by now, certain allowances are made for you?

Dries: You have a point, but the fact is that my collections sell well. I don’t want to come across as a commercial designer, but I am a designer concerned with creating garments for men and women that sell. Other designers are concerned with creating an image so that they can sell accessories or perfume. In most companies, accessories, shoes and bags make up 60–70% of sales – for us it’s only 7%, the other 93% is clothing.

Anja: You have been stressing the importance of designing garments to wear, rather than garments for show, but how do you keep this balance in an environment that now puts so much emphasis on the photogenic nature of clothes?

Dries: I have had to start thinking about what garments look good viewed on an iPod or smartphone. The first three looks have to be intriguing enough to make people want to see the rest. You can’t tell the whole story at once.

Anja: On a slightly different note, what’s important to you in terms of ideology and design ethics?

Dries: The fashion industry is full of tricks about how to create desirability and make things more commercial. You can find it in how you merchandise a collection, how you link garments or how you connect an element that sold well one season to items the following season. I try to avoid all that. I want my work to be honest and straightforward – I don’t like tricks.
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Tue Nov 10, 2015 7:05 am

INFLUENTIAL FASHION EDUCATORS: ROYAL ACADEMY OF ART ANTWERP’S WALTER VAN BEIRENDONCK (Cesar Majorana , July 2015)

WALTER VAN BEIRENDONCK ON KANYE WEST, THE CURRENT STATE OF FASHION AND TEACHING SUCCESS
Einstein once remarked that there’s no flintstone in an empty room, which is probably why the fifth floor of the iconic Modenatie building smells of burnt leather. A student is adding loafer details to his Adidas Superstar sneakers. In the back of the museum-like white cube chamber students are gazing at a Stockman tailor dummy. You could say that there’s a certain creative flow going on here, but to really understand the underlying structure of this elite heaven for aspiring fashion designers there’s one man you need to speak to: fashion’s own antithesis Walter van Beirendonck. In the heart of the Belgian fashion capital we spoke about Kanye West, the current state of fashion and teaching success – “If I see a student’s work is not there yet I demand more effort, research and work. They might cry in the process, but that’s nothing horrible.”

Just like I imagined, Walter van Beirendonck carefully strokes his beard when pondering an answer. The head of Antwerp’s Royal Academy fashion course is sporting a pair of his own Crocodile shoes. I’m wearing sneakers by his former intern Raf Simons, hoping he’d understand the homage. I’d come to regret that choice later in the interview when Walter tells me “I didn’t want to hire Raf at first.”

There are mainly two types of answers you can get to any question you ask Walter. The first kind is a sort of appropriation, where he makes you regret your question and serves you an answer you could’ve easily guessed yourself. He typically adds a small anecdote to those answers “What I learned from my time with Raf? Nothing, well his mom used to make nice egg sandwiches for us”, like an uncle at an indolent Belgian birthday party rehashing past memories. The second kind, my favourite, is when he makes sharp omniscient statements. Getting to either of these answers requires a little wariness.

During our 2 hour talk Walter van Beirendonck cuts me off twice to tell me I’m being gossipy. I might be. When I eventually ask the Antwerp Six icon for which reasons he might expel a student, he gazes at my notebook and says “Now I don’t like where you are going with these questions. You need to think about what you’re doing”. I reply resolutely, saying “Yes, it’s just that this whole process interests me” but it’s a misplaced retort to his ears as he confronts me “I feel like you’re being gossipy. I don’t like gossip”. In just two hours’ time I don’t think the head of the Royal Academy of Fine Arts’ Fashion department has grown very fond of me. Nonetheless, the number two type answers made it worth a visit to Antwerp. Take, for example:

In the late 80s you designed a comic book (King Kong Kooks), you’ve since also curated a newspaper and curated for a museum. You’re all over the place.

I’ve always been interested in broadening my field of work.

Rick Owens does the same with his furniture line and young avant-gardists as vlaada chvatil and Kofta actively step in the field of product design. Is the creative vision of a fashion designer justified to be multidisciplinary?

Every person’s creative vision is justified to be expressed. Some designers think other disciplines are redundant, but the nice thing about this world is that these possibilities exist and can be used. If my mailman wants to record an album he should.

But does it really work the other way around? Producer and rapper Kanye West had a fatal dance with the fashion world and didn’t survive – complaining to be marginalized as a rapper.

Kanye came to me for an internship. He also applied at Raf. But could you believe that? Kanye interning with me?

Haha!

I thought it was funny. He brought his mood boards and had a lot of ambition, but you could see a lack of formal training. He noticed it too. It’s something you can’t fake. He aggressively stormed the fashion world without the proper initiation or introduction. He had a lot of connections and possibilities, but not the right skills or talents. The result of that of course is falling and getting up again. But it’s just sad because of the energy that went into it. That first collection was so bad.

You’ve been teaching for a long time now.

I’ve been teaching since 1985. Just 4 years after graduating I was asked to come back and teach. It was something I really didn’t want to be doing at first.

Why the reluctance?

I was just as old as the students! To be working with such young people, as a teacher, was like working on the same level. Now I have some authority, but then it was just about sitting down with someone your own age and critiquing them. It was hard.

Can you immediately see if a student has a worthwhile vision?

Nowadays I can easily see where there’s potential. I see students from their third year on so by that time they’re pretty developed.

You managed to keep your independence as a designer at the difficult cost of offering your creative flow to more commercial outlets. Were you ever prepared to make those choices at the Antwerp Academy? How do you make sure your current students are prepared to?

It was a choice I made. It depends on the temperament or character of the person at hand. There are some who look to experiment and others who automatically gravitate towards the commercial side. I really work closely with my students to make sure they’re at a level where they can choose for themselves.

How?

We meet two times a week and it’s a made to measure course where everyone gets what they need. We do fittings together, look at volumes, materials and drawings. It’s really like working together.

Between graduating in 82 and starting your label in 85 there’s an undeniable pair of gap-years. What did you do during those years?

Between graduating and my first collection (85/86) I’ve done a lot of competitions. Like The Golding Spindle. We all did [The Antwerp Six –red.]. It made sense to have that experience. We travelled a lot too.

The six of you decided to travel overseas early on.

We had national recognition, but internationally that meant nothing. Belgium didn’t even have a proper fashion culture. We had no forefathers who paved a way for our success. We decided that if we wanted success we had to work it out by ourselves. That’s why we travelled, first to London, the British designer show. Afterwards to Japan and America. Sometimes Martin Margiela came too – we were seven.

You were perhaps the first Western designers to crossover to Asia.

Yes, we did a tour through Japan, but it was a tour with a Belgian minister who went for business and took us ‘for fun’. It wasn’t about a market or anything. It was just about going and exploring.

The secret to commercial success in contemporary fashion is incredibly sought after. What do you tell your students about this?

You can’t program it, success. You can be ambitious and want your work to be successful, but there is nothing to steer that. I can’t really teach students the key to success. But working hard, getting a signature and staying true to yourself is a good way to find people who will help you get somewhere.

Was that taught to you while you were a student at the academy?

That was something I learned by myself. When we studied here times were different. It was mainly due to our own ambition and our own exploration, especially just the group motivating itself, that we went to fashion weeks all over the world.

It’s a sort of synergy.

Exactly! There was no sense of competition or envy. For example, Ann was good at presentations so Dries wanted to improve his. That’s how it went. It was very friendly, we were always working together.

Can you spark that with your students?

Some years you do, some you don’t. It has to happen organically. For us it’s most important that students have their own voices. Some years you see that the students stick together, but sometimes they split up in smaller groups. We can’t package them.

I heard that some students here have their own interns. What’s that about?

That started with the Asian students. I don’t know why. I’ve never seen European students work this way. These interns are mostly people who can’t get in here. They want to gain more experience before reapplying.

I would feel upset as a hardworking student who can’t afford interns.

You shouldn’t be, we usually don’t know about these interns – it’s not like students take them to school. We judge your work as it is.

Perhaps those students deserve some slack too, managing people isn’t an easy job.

Perhaps, but we shouldn’t get caught up in these anomalies. It feels gossipy.

Craig Green worked with you and you’ve been quoted as saying that you taught him to voice himself. How do you get that out of people?

It happens naturally. People come to work here and find their voice, the same goes for Bernard Wilhelm. I think it’s due to the environment. We have a small team and lack much luxury; there isn’t an abundance of computers or machines. It’s a huge experience to not be overwhelmed by those in the fashion world, where money is so common. We prove that with creativity and believe, something is possible that can’t be purchased.

His graduate collection was incredibly controversial. Something you have been known for yourself. How much does your voice equal that of Craig Green? Or even your students?

My strong imagination really prevents me from being influenced. I try to view stuff from the student’s perspective as much as possible. At other schools teachers seem more dominant, like Vivienne Westwood: she makes little Westwoods all the time. With all due respect, because dominance isn’t easy to maintain, but that’s not how we do things here.

But students still cry from time to time here, don’t they?

It’s only natural. Tears usually prove that there’s an acknowledgement, an understanding of something. If I see a student’s work is not there yet I demand more effort, research and work. They might cry in the process, but that’s nothing horrible.

Any WvB collection always seems to have a certain amount of provocation. Depictions of the phallus return often in your work. Do you ever back down?

But wait, I never think about shocking people. It’s more a problem for those who are shocked than it is for me. If I think I should show something… I do it.

Do you teach your students how to shock in the contemporary age of fashion?

We never speak in terms of shocking, we speak about experimenting and changing boundaries. I feel, and this is how I work with students, that over the years I changed a lot of boundaries – on gender, the link between male and female etc. It’s always about making a difference, which sometimes can be shocking. But shock value is never an objective. By no means.

Your last collection made remarks on the Charlie Hebdo massacre. How did that happen?

A part of that message was already there. I later added STOP TERRORISING OUR WORLD, which was something I actually made for the Winter 2006/2007 collection. Just ten days after what happened in Paris I decided it fitted well.

Do you condemn fashion houses which have lost their urge to speak out? I used to love Damir Doma, who over the years shifted towards a safer clientele. Is it really necessary to do that?

You should go and speak with him about that. Some designers choose for money and backing and then you can’t do ‘raw’ stuff anymore because it isn’t appreciated by your backers. It always has to do with the urge for money and, perhaps, possibilities.

What is your advice for young designers?

They shouldn’t be too money-grubbing. He probably knows that. These decisions give more possibilities but also way more limits. This process repeats itself indefinitely. These are hard choices everyone has to make.

Students easily romanticise the idea of being taken up by a mega-conglomerate. Don’t they?

Students are fascinated by it! By the power these houses have. Those places are usually where they start out and learn a lot. Some get motivated to start their own business, others will want to stay there. Creative consultancy isn’t something you easily get to do. We have some talent scouts come over here and they usually decide who would be a good match for them.

Your husband, Dirk van Saene, once remarked you have the same unorthodox drive as Karl Lagerfeld. Karl’s work ethos comes at the price of complete isolation. He’s almost famous for his sense of detachment. Are you familiar with this artistic isolation?

Well I think he’s very happy. He chooses to be happy this way and that’s a great thing. He still enjoys doing all these projects and runways. I think it’s beautiful that that works out.

Your work is always described as very pop, while I’ve always noticed it’s more punk in the sense of anti-establishment and anti-convention.

I consider myself to be more punk than pop. Mainly so because I play with elements of punk-mentality: opposition, reactionary. It’s not so much in the visual: I’m way too colourful. Punk is never colourful, perhaps that makes me seem pop.

I used to go to school with kids who’d wear a Ramones shirt while not even knowing the word punk.

Well, iconic designs simply get translated to mainstream appeal. That’s how the mainstream works. People buy into a feeling and don’t know what it stands for anymore.

Punk fans are upset seeing their iconic band-shirts selling at fast fashion stores, yet fashion enthusiasts are stuck waiting in line to consume offerings such as Alexander Wang x H&M. Do you think that opposition is paradoxical?

I won’t be the first to say that those collaborations have to happen, but it does bring democratisation to fashion. It’s not even about the money for these designers. It’s about reaching an audience.

But just a year earlier you would see Wang’s iconic designs copied by H&M without any collaboration. It’s almost humiliating.

I don’t have any problem with those cheap clothes, but they shouldn’t be copied from other designers. I would love it if strong designers would come up to H&M to make their own collections under the H&M brand. H&M are already realizing they shouldn’t just interpret current tendencies. And here I do believe they have good intentions, which are not working out perfectly yet. But it will happen. Just watch.

We’re at a turning point in fashion where the old ways aren’t functioning anymore, but the new ones aren’t either. It’s just like in the eighties when there was a particular take on fashion. Just 10 years later it changed – and now it’s happening again.

How would you describe this change?

Evolution. It’s an evolution of communication. The change of communication is shifting fashion. How people treat images now (sending them around immediately) changes how we value and critique products.

Exactly! Your last collection played into this very well I believe. The backside of each piece was ‘undesigned’ simple calico.

Yes, yes, yes. The reference goes way back, in menswear in the 1800’s only the frontside of garments would be decorated to save money on the backside. That made me think of Style.com not showing backsides to clothing. I told Tim [Blanks, editor at Style.com – red.] that it was a direct response to the site. Creative clothing just doesn’t work very well on webshops or style.com. I’ve seen Comme des Garçons pieces not getting sold because the photography doesn’t show the genius of it.

Newspapers and printed press are a reoccurring theme in your work, like the ‘fashion is dead’ newspaper you handed out at a show. Last year Suzy Menkes wrote a popular op-ed on the fashion circus surrounding shows. Did you read it?

I think I read it.

Do you also find the amount of pea-cocking around shows vulgar?

There’s nothing vulgar here. It really doesn’t bother me. I like it, its expression and enthusiasm. Even if these bloggers get paid to wear some things. At the end, fashion effectively is a circus.

Bloggers judge something from a “Do I think it’s good” perspective while a journalist tries to answer “Is it good?”. Would you agree?

Yes, very much. Most bloggers with a serious passion for journalism move on from there. They apply at magazines and papers. Lidewij Edelkoort’s recent statement Fashion is Dead is very on point here. Everyone should read it.

How has this change of front-row guests, from fashion elites to bloggers had any effect on the production of fashion?

I try to work around all that. There are some things that don’t make sense here, like… it’s weird to see celebrities and bloggers get clothing for free, while they’re the ones who can afford it. But being in the industry for a while I can sense that it is a question of time. Eventually other people will fill the front-row. And there is nothing wrong with that. Fashion is constantly shifting and that’s what I like about it.
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby dbcooper » Wed Nov 11, 2015 7:59 am

9 JUNE 2015
The Belgians

The Belgians. An Unexpected Fashion Story, held at the BOZAR center for fine arts in Brussels is an exhibition about the rise and success of Belgian fashion designers. The exhibition takes an in-depth look at the DNA of Belgian fashion and sheds light on the work of around 100 designers, from the first pioneers to the new generation of today.

Since the 1980s it’s impossible to imagine the international fashion scene without Belgian designers. As unexpected as it might seem, the ‘Antwerp Six’ were flavor of the month at the beginning of the 1980s and so it is quite natural to find the Belgian designers in today’s international fashion circuit. The professionalism, craftsmanship, quality and technicality that the Belgians demonstrate, come from the international recognition they have enjoyed for several decades now.

Featuring the work of A.F Vandervost, Ann Demeulemeester, Bernard Willhelm, Cédric Charlier, Dirk Van Saene, Dries Van Noten, Haider Ackermann, Kris Van Assche, Martin Margiela, Olivier Theyskens, Peter Pilotto and Raf Simons among others, The Belgians is a must go of the Summer 2015 season for any fashion lover.

The Belgians. An Unexpected Fashion Story will run until the 13th of September at the BOZAR center for fine arts in Brussels, Belgium.

http://www.bozar.be


http://www.unflop.it/blog/articles/the-belgians
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Fri Nov 13, 2015 10:14 am

Image

SUMMER '89

Showroom

102, Rue Reamur, Paris 75002.

Situated on the 3rd floor, its three rooms and all contents are entirely painted in white and with each piece of furniture covered in white cotton.

Presentation

October 1988

A telegram is sent inviting people to attend 'Cafe de la Gare', an old theatre with wooden benches. The women wearing the collection stand down from the podium to join the crowd. Records of hard rock music alternate with softer 1970's rock. Hair is loosely brushed forward, eyes blackened and lips were red. A line imitating a stocking seam is drawn in pencil on the back of back legs.

Collection

Only one silhouette, to the ankle, very narrow, with cropped shoulders. The form is very constructed by the way of many darts. Japanese workmen's shoes are mounted on thick round heels.

There are three groups of colour:

Degrees of white worn against the skin. The sleeves of a sweater or shirt are worn alone, skirts and trousers have knees moulded by darts. Suntan marks are visible on the skin.

Degrees of red are combined. Faces are veiled in bright coloured cotton. The models footprints marks the white cotton runway with red paint.

Black and transparent garments are printed with tattoo motifs.

As a finale to the show all of the models come out wearing 'Haute Couture' work coats.


My phone does some weird strobing, apologies

Image
Image
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^make up similar to galliano margiela
Spoiler:
Image
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