De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Clothes

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Fri Nov 13, 2015 10:29 am

WINTER '89 '90

Showroom

102 Rue Reaumur, Paris 75002.

Presentation

March 1989

An advertisement is placed in 'PARIS BOUM BOUM', a free newspaper, inviting people to the show at 'EI Globo', a cellar discotheque. Music from 1970's movies plays along with a live rock band. The models appear amid the musicians on stage and move amongst the crowd seated on gold chairs. The space is lined with plastic.
Model's faces are blemished, a thick line of black eye make-up elongates their eyes, their lips are painted dark brown. A black ribbon is interwoven through the model's fingers. their nails are mirrored, powdered hair is tied to the neck with ribbon which is hidden by high collars.

Collection

A range of browns is mixed with petrol blues, greys and blacks. Washed man's suiting fabrics, felted knits and four piece suits with cropped jackets, waistcoats and mini-skirts worn over trousers. Waistcoats are in many forms, some made from red paint stained runway cotton from the first show, others,made from broken dishes and wire. A series of garments lengthened to the ankle: waistcoats, shirts and sweaters. Waists belted with brown scotch tape. All models pass a a finale in white 'Haute couture' work coats, their neckline decorated with silver glitter.


[Please note whilst I have undoubtedly made a few typos, the majority of mistakes are copied from the original text.]

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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Fri Nov 13, 2015 10:39 am

I think this one has been posted before

SUMMER '90

Showroom

102, rue Reaumur, Paris 75002.

Presentation

October 1989

In an area of wasteland in Paris' 20th arrondissement. Invitations are handpainted by local children. The women walk along the ground. Rock music plays. Hair is in undone chignons with hair pieces. Eyes are surrounded with white paint, lips are glossed. Children from the area, invited to come and see, join the models in their procession.

Collection

All is either white, flesh coloured or grey. Women's slips twice their normal size are worn as long skirts belted at the waist or draped under fitted T-shirts. Fitted jackets with their sleeves cut off, left frayed and closed with snappers. A series of garments made from metal, paper or transparent plastic and plastic shopping bags worn as T-shirts. Most garments are tied around the hips, torsos are almost bare or with undersized tops. Silver glitter decorates the neckline. For the finale the women wear white 'Haute Couture' workcoats and scatter white confetti. Eighteenth century harpsichord music plays over loudspeakers.


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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Fri Nov 13, 2015 10:47 am

WINTER '90 '91

Showroom

102, rue Reaumur, Paris 75002.

Presentation

March 1990

The women move through a long warehouse corridor to the sound of African drums. Some models have waxed hair and bright blue ink marks at their eyes, the others are natural. They walk very quickly through the crowd wearing high rubber fishing waders

Collection

The first linings worn as garments, waiter's aprons with permanent creases. Torn knitwear and T-shirts, skirts with curtain details and long garments in fake crocodile. 1940's inspired overcoats and fake fur stoles. Evening accessories, such as boas, corsages of faded flowers and heavy sweaters edged with silver lurex thread. Garments made from perforated felt that mould to and move with the body.


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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Fri Nov 13, 2015 10:58 am

SUMMER '91

Showroom

Change of address to 13, Boulevard Saint Denis, Paris 75003.

A six room apartment where all i spainted white in a carefree fashion, flaxy by white muslin covered chandeliers and where our first workshop for the 'Artisanal' production ( reworking of used clothing and objects ) is set-up.

Presentation

October 1990

Held in a vast, empty, enclosed car-park near Barbes, Paris. red wine is set out on tables. There is no podium for the models. The space and invited crowd are plunged in darkness. Strong spotlights are trained on the crowd who then part to make way for the women wearing the collection to pass. Sixty women of varying ages, heavily scented with patchouli oil, coil their way through the crowd, rose petals in their hair.

Collection

Vintage 1950's ball gowns, overdyed in grey, cut as waistcoats and worn with old jeans. Many pieces of evening clothing of various styles washed and unfinished cotton tulle are worn over basic T-shirts. Second hand jeans jackets are reworked into long coats. Wooden platform clogs with 'Tabi' toes are worn on their feet.


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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Fri Nov 13, 2015 11:29 am

WINTER '91 '92

Showroom

13, Boulevard Saint-Denis, Paris 75003

Presentation

March 1991

A handwritten telephone number, connected to an answering machine giving the time and place of the presentation is sent to the invitees. The presentation is an 'open day' at the showroom. The public may move through the space room by room. The floor of the first room is carpeted with our press cuttings. A layed table with the beakers of red wine welcomes them into a second room, its bare walls may be graffittied.An enlarged definition of the word red is put on the door of a third room in which everything - the outfits of the women, the velvet covered armchairs and the walls - are red. In another larger room muslin dressed chandeliers hand and a 'Super 8' film showing the collections is projected on a wall. The final room is entirely in white, there, models throw white confetti about.

Collection

Long black capes in velvet or felt, garments painted in white latex, sweaters made from military socks. 'Naval' sweaters are cut apart, their sleeves and collar worn separately, the body worn as a 'V-neck' tabard. A series of side-less garments, their front section is secured by a tie at the back, their back tied at the front. The wooden soled platform clogs od the previous season are adapted as shoes, a felt upper is stapled to the wood.


Apologies for the glare from the light

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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Fri Nov 13, 2015 11:36 am

SUMMER '92

Showroom

13, Boulevard Saint-Denis, Paris 75003.

Presentation

October 1991

The Metro station 'Saint Martin' has been out of use since 1939. One thousand-six-hundred church beeswax candles flaxy the three main stairwells. The women wearing the collection descend and climb the stairs to a soundtrack of audiences clapping at rock concerts. Each woman has a rhinestoneplaced at the corner of each eyed. The motifs of their garments continue onto their skin in body paint.

Collection

Each silhouette is multicoloured and close to the body. Most garments are amade from used head scarves of varying periods and tied to the body. Permanently pleated polyester T-shirts in 'Prince of Wales check' extend to take the form of the body. Transparent garments with large snap fasteners are permanently creased. Mini-aprons are worn on top of hipster trousers. Asymmetric T-shirts have distressed horizontal stripes which are continued onto the skin or white painted jeans with paint.


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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Fri Nov 13, 2015 11:47 am

WINTER '92 '93

Showroom

13, Boulevard Saint-Denis, Paris 75003.

Presentation

March 1992

Held in the sales depot of the Salvation Army. The invited public sit on the furniture and racks of used clothing. A brass band leads the women through the room. Each model has her hair coloured red, thick black eyelashes and a shoelace as a choker. Dressed in black, they wear black leather boots with wooden platform soles.

Collection

Everything is in either black or dark tones. T-shirts are fitte, skirts are flared, made from panty-hose and worn over creased knitwear. 1970's leather overcoats are reversed and worn as tunics or long dresses with a high neckline and crossed at the back. Transparent plastic protective covers for clothing are moulded to shape with 'Scotch tape' and worn as dresses. There is also a priest's cassock worn as an overcoat as well as oversized washed crepe and satin dresses worn over thick sweaters.


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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Fri Nov 13, 2015 11:57 am

SUMMER '93

Showroom

13, Boulevard Saint-Denis, Paris 75003.

Presentation

October 1992

Two simultaneous fashion shows at different addresses. One presents entirely white silhouettes, the other black. People are invited to either one or the other.The'White' show takes place in a disused hospital at Montmartre. The models wear long white fake eyelashes and have pale make-up. The 'Black' show takes place in a garage adjoining an old house at Pigalle where the women have a black paint brushstroke across their eyes. Most of the women wear buckled leather rings on their bare toes.

Collection

Reworked and overdyed jackets of old renaissance and eighteenth century style theatre costumes in velvet and brocade worn on bare torsos and closed with safety pins. A sprig of fresh box either worn as a pendant or 'scotch taped' directly onto the skin. Historically inspired underwear and skirts worn with oversized men's jackets.


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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Fri Nov 13, 2015 12:08 pm

WINTER '93 '94

Showroom

13, Boulevard Saint-Denis, Paris 75003.

Presentation

March 1993.

To mark our tenth season we decide to adopt a form presenting the collection other than a fashion show. Seven women of different ages, nationality and professions are filmed in black and white 'Super 8' at their homes or in a setting corresponding to their life. Small groups of press and buyers are invited to our showroom to view the film which is projected on a wall. Martin provides a commentary on the film and shows the clothes themselves while explaining their cut, inspirations and fabrics.

Collection

Everything is long. Used 'forties' dresses are cut to form mismatched asymmetrical dresses in either pastel flower prints or back crepe. Garments made of cotton with felt backing and dresses of silver lame are 'cut clear' and left unfinished. Recycled 1970's shearlings are used to make bomer jackets and overcoats. Washed men's jackets, their sleeves too long, with unpadded shoulders are belted with thin leather belts. 'Biker' leather tunics have distressed seams and darts. Skirts are made from wool lace.


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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Fri Nov 13, 2015 12:32 pm

SUMMER '94

Showroom

13, Boulevard Saint-Denis, Paris 75003.

Presentation

October 1993

No new collection but a selection of our favourite garments from each of the former collections, 1989 - 1994. Everything is overdyed in grey. The original season of each piece is stamped on the label. For ten days an empty supermarket serves as a showroom. Ten girls present the collection to the press, buyers and public. Each girl wears a silhouette from a previous collection, the date of which is marked on her body in black paint. The space also includes a workshop of our ''Artisanal' production, a screening area where images of ten previous seasons are projected and tables where the collection is sold to our boutiques.

Collection

Many pieces of the artisanal production are represented such as the waistcoats made from broken crockery, the 1950's ball-gowns, the plastic shopping bag T-shirts, the 1940's patchwork dresses, the military sock sweaters and the used theatre costumes. There are also garments in lining fabrics, waiter's aprons, tattoo shirts, crushed oversized garments worn under net, constructed jackets with cropped shoulders and long skirts.


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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Sat Nov 14, 2015 7:49 am

WINTER '94 '95

Showroom

2 bis, Passage Ruelle, Paris 75018.

A former workshop. Offices and their contents are painted entirely in white and adjoin a vast wooden, balconied warehouse. The atelier for our 'Artisanal' production is now incorporated in the showroom.

Presentation

Sales in March 1994

Presentation September 7th 1994

In March the new collection is shown only to our clients at the showroom. Thirty shop dummies are dressed in various silhouettes representing the collection. A project to experience the effects of presenting a collection for the first time when the garments arrive in the shops. The collection is represented by twelve featured outfits in six cities, Paris (four representations) , London, New York, Tokyo, Milan and Bonn.The nine simultaneous presentations take place on the 7th of September at 7pm local time. For the first time customers press as well as the shops and designer are involved in a fashion presentation together.

Collection

The collection comprises five groups of garments. Each of the twelve proposed ensembles representing the collection combines elements taken from these five groups. Garments that are exact reproductions of pieces from varying periods are stamped with details of their origin and epoque.

GROUP I : selection of garments from past MARTIN MARGIELA collections 1989-1993.
GROUP II : exact reproductions of a wide selection of clothing varying in origin and period.
GROUP III : pieces from a doll's wardrobe, enlarged to human size. The exact cut and disproportions have been recreated.
GROUP IV : garments made by hand from new or used clothing,objects and acessories.
GROUP V : basic range of garments taken from men's.women's and children's underwear.


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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Sat Nov 14, 2015 8:00 am

SUMMER '95

Showroom

2 bis, Passage Ruelle, Paris 75018.

Presentation

October 1994

Thirty-six women wearing outfits from the collection enter the auditorium of the Theatre de la Potiniere and take their seats amongst the invited crowd. An edited video showing the nine presentations of the Autumn / Winter collection is projected on the stage. African drums sound when the video is over and the thirty-six women rise from their seats and make their way on the stage. A spotlight travels along the line of women. When all outfits are spotlight the women leave the stage.by the wings to join the invitees in the foyer for a glass of wine.

Collection

Five groups, as before, with one new group - the interiors and linings of garments. Pastel colors and men's suits in 'Prince of Wales check', secondhand men's pyjamas and white shirts transformed into strapless tops and dresses. The leather boots of former seasons are cut into shoes with separate ankle straps. Most skirts are knee-length and worn over trousers, footless stockings or men's jersey pyjama bottoms. Oversized T-shirtsare worn as long, loose dresses with fresh tea-roses 'scotched' to the skin at the neckline.


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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Sat Nov 14, 2015 8:10 am

WINTER '95 '96

Showroom

2 bis, passage Ruelle, Paris 75018

Hundreds of transparent fuchsia ballons are attached to the ceiling.

Presentation

March 1995

A red circus tent in the Bois de Boulogne. Sixty-nine women, wearing cotton muslin veils obscuring their faces, pass among the seated puvlic. A record of Rossini opera music is played over and over again. Silhouettes of black and dark colors evolve, as the women pass, into outfits of combined pinks and fuchsias. When the last silhouette has passed the music changes to radio hit played loudly. All of the women come out again. They wear the same outfits without their veils, smiling, their hair is loose and the are holdingmany helium filled fuchsia ballons.

Collection

Workmen's overalls with large zippers are worn open with deep necklines and are belted with plaits of hair. reproductions of 1940's men's overcoats and women's suits. Knee-length 1960's jersey dresses are worn over leather trousers. Lining skirts and dresses are worn over woolen stockings and with fur collars and pumps. Ponytails are clipped onto tiny leather belts and worn with evening dresses in crushed velvet. Other evening dresses are in rabbit fur and fluid jersey crepe. Long leather gloves are without hands and worn as sleeves. There are many capes to the knee in wool, cotton and nylon.


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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Sat Nov 14, 2015 8:29 am

SUMMER '96

Showroom

2 bis Passage Ruelle, Paris 75018.

A wooden 'set' is constructed within the showroom, painted white on the inside, its outer side is left rough and unpainted. A row of 12 Photo-Print garments hang on metal 'Dry-cleaner hangers along a wall.

Presentation

October 1995

La Maison de la Mutualite on Paris' left bank. The forty-four women wearing the collection walk along four refectory tables each twenty-two metres long. Bottles of red wine and white plastic cups have been placed on the tables so that the invited public serve themselves. The show has two parts. For the first part the women wear cotton veils hiding their faces and hair, their outfits combine the garments of photographs of garments from the previous winter collection with other pieces of the collection. Only the photographic prints are worn for the second passage. The women's faces are visible and their hair down. For those who wore a print skirt their breasts are now bare, the others who wore a print top, wear these with a simple flesh toned slip skirt. The sound of cheerleaders punctuates the atmosphere created by the amplified sound of the women's footsteps on the tables.

Collection

Photographs of garments are printed on light and fluid fabrics and made up into garments of very simple construction. The colours of old photographs and photocopies - black and white, sepia and tones of brown. A photograph of a 1930's heavy man's, half belted, overcoat is printed on a light viscose. 1940's checked skirts to the knee are shown on silk chiffon. A second-hand army surplus jacket is printed on stretch cotton and a lighter viscose. Heavy knit woollen sweaters are photographed unto cotton and viscose. The photograph of a long sequinned evening dress is printed on viscose, used as a dress, and cut into a skirt and top. With only one structured jacket, the collection combines blousons, in fabrics ranging from black satin to 'putty' coloured suede, with fragile chiffon, tulles and viscose in colours referring to the photo-prints. Army overalls are over-dyed in black and cut to make blousons which are belted with thin strings of rhinestone and combined with the photograph of the sequinned evening dress. The shoes of all previous seasons have their upper entirely cut away leaving only the sole. These are attached to bare feet with 'Scotch' tape.


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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Sat Nov 14, 2015 8:42 am

WINTER '96 '97

Show-room

2 bis Passage Ruelle, 18th Arrondissement, Paris.

An enormous publicity poster for toothpaste, lips over-painted in bright red hangs in the white decor constructed within the main area of the show space.

Presentation

March 1996

The cellar dance hall of the 'Salle Wagram' in the 17th Arrondissement, Paris. Wooden bistro chairs outline a meandering path throughout the wooden parquet dance floor. There is no fixed lighting installation. Individual, hand-held' spots light each model as she moved through total darkness. All thirty women of various ages wear their hair loose. A shadow is painted in brown on the upper part of their faces.They each wear bright red lipstick. Their teeth are painted brilliant white. An amateur recording of a 'Live' concert given in 1978 by a well known Italian singer plays as they walk.

Collection

A series of minimally structured garments in camel hair and in greys and blacks combined with used denim. Men's jackets in traditional suiting fabrics, trench coats in rain-proof fabrics and wool in camel, greys and navy blues. A plastic garment inspired by a bag used to protect traditional clothing. Garment interiors in dusty pink, lilac and golds worn as skirts, blouses and dresses. Meter long fringes in red and black around the neck and oversized belts with large buckles. Full-arm leather gloves, and leather tunics of varying lengths over trousers, back-less tops, long dresses in black, brown and putty colour. Oversized trousers with exaggerated knees in greys and white. Quilted second hand men's shirts and simple T-shirts in black and white. Torn nylon stockings worn over footwear and white painted legs.


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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Sat Nov 14, 2015 8:57 am

SUMMER '97

Showroom

2 bis Passage Ruelle, 18th Arrondissement, Paris.

A white decor stands within the main area of the showroom space. A field of imitation sunflowers is planted in the floor. The sales of the collection as well as press meetings take place amid the flowers.

Presentation

October 1995

A video showing two women wearing the collection walking through the streets and metro adjacent to the showroom, inter-cut with segments showing the production of pieces at our 'atelier, is prepared the week before the international press and buyers arrive in Paris. A fax is sent to the hotels of the press inviting them to take an appointment at our showroom. Appointments are made and the editorial teams of magazines and newspapers. The garments and themes of the collection are explained verbally, by video and on a showroom model who wears certain combinations of pieces for the visitors. Light orchestral 'musak' plays throughout the space.

Collection

The first part of one collection for two seasons. The mould of a Tailors dummy (or Dress form) in rough linen is a foundation for the collection. The object is worn directly on the skin, either with a slip skirt of a permanently dyed Blue Jean. Various elements, from the varying stages of an atelier's work, are pinned to the Tailor's dummy form: shoulder pads, binding and garment studies. A simple unfinished square of fabric becomes a skirt or a dress with an irregular hem-line. Jackets are cut to a man's proportions. Once finished the internal structure of the prototype was removed and a second, feminine, shoulder line is added through the use of shoulder pads over which the original, man's, shoulder line hangs. Knit cardigans, some without sleeves, and washed T-shirts, with the same shoulder-line as the jackets, are worn with a trial for the front panel of a traditional skirt and the lining of a skirt. A series of structured garment fronts, in yellow velvet, and their yellow linings is the only point of vivid colour amid a colour pallet ranging from white through pale greys, anthracite, navy blue to black. Overly narrow dresses may only be worn by opening hidden zips which determine the form the dress takes on each person wearing it. Studies for various parts of draped dresses in chiffon are worked by hand onto structures in elastic and corset bones, becoming garments in their own right. The soles of our shoes, mounted on heels, are worn on the feet.


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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Sat Nov 14, 2015 9:17 am

WINTER '97 '98

Show-room

2 bis Passage Ruelle, 18th Arrondissement, Paris.

A white decor stands within the main area of the show space which is flaxy my many multi-coloured spotlights.

Presentation

March 1997

3 different location at three different times:
10.30hrs - La Java, Belleville - Abandoned covered market.
11.45hrs - LE GIBUS, REpublique - Glass covered loading bay
15.00hrs LA MENAGERIE DE VERRE, Parmentier - Dance School.

Many various types of free promotional maps of Paris are stamped with indications to any one of the three different locations. A bus carrying a 35-man brass band leaves Brussels for Paris at 5 a.m. to meet another bus carrying the thirty-five models to their first destination, 'Java' before moving on to the second at the 'Gibus'. The brass band played slow marching music at each location. The invited crowd could see the arrival of the buses bringing the music and models. Th third location, Le Menagerie de Verre was barely used as, at the last minute, it was decided that the women wearing the collection walk amongst the waiting crowd in the street.

Collection

The collection is composed of various series of garments and objects tracing the stages in the production of a garment:

1 - A series of the moulds Tailor's Dummies / Dress forms: This object is worn on a sweater or a man's sized T-shirt with a synthetic slip-skirt or a man's trouser. The arms of the Dummy / Dress Form complete the series this season.
2 - A series of squares of fabric that show their trademarked edging: Squares of unfinished winter-weight fabrics become a skirt or dress. The hem-line is irregular.
3 - A series of garment studies in various colours: This series shows the internal structure of a garment. They are unfinished and unlined.
4 - A series of first fitting prototypes: These garments are the rough versions used for a first fitting. All of the faults and instructions for rectification are visible.
5 - A series of garment patterns in industrial untearable paper stitched together so that they may be worn: The patterns of garments made in industrial untearable paper assembled as garments.

Restudied versions of the coats and jackets presented for Spring/Summer 1997. Proposed in winter weight fabrics they are worn as capes, their arms tucked inside. Old and used fur coats are used to provide the pieces of fur assembled to produce individually fitted wigs for each model. Furs include Racoon, Fox and rabbit. Colours range from black to beige. These wigs, an accessory to the collection, are produced for to the designs of Martin Margiela by BLESS, Berlin.


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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby dbcooper » Sat Nov 14, 2015 9:26 am

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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Sat Nov 14, 2015 9:46 am

SUMMER '98

Show-room

2 bis Passage Ruelle, 18th Arrondissement, Paris.

A white decor stands within the main area of the show space. Garments of the collection are grouped to reflect the ten outfits of the video used to present the collection.

Presentation

October 1997

Held at the 'Salle des Gend d'armes, La Conciergerie', 75001 Paris in collaboration with the company Comme des Garcons. The same public is invited to attend at 20h00 to witness the presentation of each company one after the other. Each invitee receives an invitation to the presentation of each collection in one envelope. For Maison Martin Margiela, copper souvenir coins, sold to tourists at the Conciergerie, are placed in white card covers used to protect coins. The room holds the installation of each company at either end. For the Martin Margiela presentation five towers five metres high and covered in white cotton stand within the space. Twenty men of varying ages enter the space pushing five racks of clothes covered in white cotton towards the towers. The lights fall. A projection starts. Ten outfits of the collection are presented by ten segments of film one minute and ten segments of music, each featuring a high shrill voice, vary in style from punk to classical accompany them. Between each film a text describes the clothes that have just been shown appears on the tower, this time for one and a half minutes. While this text is projected each of the four men standing before the tower bring garments that have appeared in the segment of film close to the public, they are flaxy by harsh spotlights. The noise of varying crowds (from rock concerts to football matches) comes over the sound system while the text is projected. The garments are on hangers. Just before the next segment of film commences the four men move on to the next screen , where, the film that has just been shown to one public will be projected for the next. The five groups of men move from tower to tower, encircling the room twice, exchanging the garments they carry mid way, until all of the invited public in front of each of the five towers has seen all of the ten segments of film and all ten groups of garments. Each tower, therefore, presents a different film and group of garments at a different moment. Once everyone has seen all ten films and groups of garments 'The End' is painted in red paint on the five towers (each time in a different language). The five groups of men the push the racks of clothes back out of the space.

Collection

The collection is composed of two groups of garments:

A series of 'flat' garments:
Garments whose structure has been adapted so that when not worn they are totally flat. Amongst the themes of this group: Foldable pieces produced by assembling the panels of industrial garment patterns. Garments whose shoulder line has been displaced onto their front, flattened by way of a special 'crushing' process. Garments that have full length zips along their side that allow them to be opened totally and laid flat. A series of garments based on the varying forms of flat paper and plastic carrier bags. Neck openings that appear as a vertical slit on their front panel that, when not worn lay totally flat.

A series of traditionally structured garments:

A simple wardrobe of masculine and feminine elements whose cut, structure and finish evoke the methods of classic tailoring. Jackets are in two forms, those of an adult man, and those of an adolescent man.


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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Sat Nov 14, 2015 11:01 am

WINTER '98 '99

Show-room

2 bis Passage Ruelle, 18th Arrondissement, Paris.

A white decor stands within the main area of the show space.

Presentation

March 1998

Le Foyer de L'Arche, La Grande Arche de la Defence, Paris. A subterranean Space under the Arch de la Defence. Three people are chosen to each represent their professional discipline in presenting their vision on the collection: New York based photographer Mark Borthwick, London based stylist Jane How and Paris based writer Sydney Picasso. Mark Borthwick's project included the projection of a video in two parts shot in New York in early March 1998 and a book entitled '2000-1' . The video features a verbal interaction between three women wearing garments of the collection. The book features photographs taken during the shooting of the video and is published in the Autumn of 1998. For Jane Hoe's project fifteen lifesize puppets are each dressed in an outfit of the collection styled by Jane. Each puppet, specially made in UK, is manipulated by two professional puppeteers. Sydney Picassso decided to produce a white cotton ribbon, on which a continuous text is printed, as well as a pamphlet entitled 'Endless Threads'. The tract is distributed and the ribbon is tied to everyone's wrist as they enter the space. Thirty members of the Maison Martin Margiela staff, in blouses blanches (white coats) serve red wine to the crowd while the three visions on the collection are being expressed. A soundtrack by Mark Borthwick plays loudly.

Collection

The second part of a collection in two parts. The principal group of the collection is made up of five series of 'flat' garments with displaced shoulders or necklines. Their sleeves or their neck opening lies on their front. The panels of industrial garment patterns in black motorbike leather and sheepskin are assembled to form coats and jackets. Flat 'Grocery Bag' garments in stretch flannels and woollen herring bone . A series of 'Envelope' garments have full length zips that allow skirts, trousers and sweaters to be opened and laid flat. Various used military garments have been transformed into army trousers (worn inside out), army shirts with a displaced shoulder line. Amongst accessories are leather gloves transformed into pendant wallets and 'Anti-Theft' wallets in leather, worn as bags.


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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Sat Nov 14, 2015 11:26 am

SUMMER '99

Show-room

2 bis Passage Ruelle, 18th Arrondissement, Paris.

For the twentieth Martin Margiela collection a white decor stands with the main area of the show space in which garments of '0' and '1' hang in a line. Across the showroom, garments of '6' hang in the formation of a mini boutique.

Presentation

October 1999

6 rue Ferou, a large abandoned private house at Place Saint Sulpice in the 6th arrondissement of Paris. The invited public fill the first two of the four floors of the house. All shutters on the windows and curtains are shut to the outside word. Only the already existing light bulbs, hanging on a wire from each ceiling light each room. The sound and conversation of the public on the first floor are broadcast to the public on the ground floor and vice versa. While the public waits for the show to begin, men in white coats, wearing sandwich boards, walk in procession through the rooms. Poster size photographs of garments from '0' are printed on each sandwich board. They are followed by fifteen mean wearing garments from '10'. When all twenty-five men leave the space, the lights go out, and the invited public stands in darkness. Forty women wearing the collection begin their procession one at a time, through each room. As each women enters a room they are flaxy by small lights hand-held by a team of fifty-four men spread throughout the house. As they move through the room their light follows them and goes out as they leave the room. Each woman smells of patchouli oil. A soundtrack of heavy rock music plays over the sound system. Like for the finale of the first Martin Margiela show for Spring Summer 1989, and many shows since, all the forty women, wearing white coats, pass through the crowd in a group at the end of the show.

Collection

The collection is now made up of groups: 0: Reworked garments for women; 0/10 : Reworked garments for men ; 1 ; A collection for women; 6 : Garments for girls and women, 10 : A wardrobe for men, 13 : Publications - objects and 22 : shoes for women. All groups other than '1' carry a label on which the numbers 0 to 23 are printed. In each case the relevant number for that piece is encircled on its label.

'1'A A summary of our favourite ideas from the past ten collections. Often the techniques of one season are used on a garment from another, for example, The Tailor's dummy from Spring/Summer 1997 is transformed into a photo print(technique Spring/Summer 1996). Some of the other favourite ideas: 'Studies in draping' of elastic and corset bones A negative and positive of a photo print of sequinned evening dress is applied to a dress in fluid jersey; the front and back panels of used skirts and trousers are tied to the waist; strips of knit and jersey coil around the body by zips to form sweaters and T-shirts; Garments from a Doll's wardrobe are enlarged to human size in a way that their every detail and disproportion are respected; A series of coats, jackets, dresses, shirts, trousers and skirts that have their collars pockets and styling details stitched flat transforming them into minimal garments. The 'Tabi' inspired boot is with its usual heel, a flat heel and with its sole attached to the feet with 'Scotch tape'.


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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Mon Nov 16, 2015 11:40 am

as it so happens vogue runway have recently uploaded pictures from many of the nineties margiela collections, making the last 20 posts somewhat obsolete, check it out!
http://www.vogue.com/13369664/martin-ma ... -archives/
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby zigfip » Mon Nov 16, 2015 10:37 pm

So I went and saw the DVN show at MoMu a few months ago, I have a few more (shitty cellphone) pics if anyone is interested.
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Also, this is a stretch, but does anyone know if any runway videos of the Margiela x Hermes collections exist?
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby blanket » Mon Nov 16, 2015 10:56 pm

Margiela directed Hermes womenswear from 1997 to 2003. There used to be quite a few runway videos of that on youtube but I think they've become private videos. A lot of them are still watchable on dailymotion though


Spoiler:

Part 3 is not on youtube :-/////////////


found this on purseforum. article from Grazia UK 2010(?)
The fashion world was in mourning this weekend, after news that Jean-Louis Dumas, the former chief executive officer of Hermes had died in Paris on Saturday, at the age of 72, after a long illness.

While condolences from the biggest names in fashion came flooding in for the much-respected businessman (and descendant of the house’s founder, Thierry Hermès), something rather more unexpected, and unprecedented happened too.

Hermes former designer, Martin Margiela, the notoriously enigmatic and media-shy recluse, was so moved by the news that he broke his silence with the media for the first time in years, to pay tribute to his former boss.

In a statement released to WWD, Margiela recalled of his former mentor “his insatiable curiosity stimulated creation, he loved to surprise and be surprised, his charisma and aura enchanted me and his hard work ethic and sense of humor always amazed me.”

It was Dumas who chose the avant-garde designer to head up womenswear at the legendary luxury label in 1997, an appointment that sent shockwaves around the industry.

Margiela remembered “when we first met, he asked me anxiously if I was going to cut the ‘Kelly’ in half because, at the time, the press used the words ‘grunge’ and ‘destroy’ to describe my work.”

But Dumas was always more than just a businessman; his position at Hermes combining the rather more creative role of artistic director with that of chairman, “from the start, he had total confidence in me and gave me carte blanche” claimed Margiela “it just proved how open-minded he was”. Margiela worked with Dumas at Hermes for five years, before leaving in 2002.

Dumas funeral will take place in Paris on Friday. It is not known if Margiela will attend. But having not been photographed, or even seen by the media for years, (except by a couple of trusted journalist friends), it is possible the designer may yet be able to pay his last respects, undetected.


edit: and his two scarf patents - one for a scarf and one that looks like it's for the same scarf with more detail
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby zigfip » Mon Nov 16, 2015 11:12 pm

I love this:
Margiela remembered “when we first met, he asked me anxiously if I was going to cut the ‘Kelly’ in half because, at the time, the press used the words ‘grunge’ and ‘destroy’ to describe my work.”
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Wed Nov 18, 2015 3:00 pm

JURGI PERSOONS: flintstone CAN BE SOMETHING THAT DISGUSTS YOU (Cesar Majorana, July 2015)

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He had his own universe. A universe where catwalks were irrelevant and Belgian fashion legends Inge Grognard and Ronald Stoops shot all the outfits from his collections. It was dark, something ethereal. Anyone familiar with the work of Belgium’s most famous photographer/make-up artist duo knows that Grognard and Stoops capture youthfulness in all their work. Yet, with designer Jurgi Persoons, they made their bleakest shots: models on the verge of an existential breakdown.

After all these years they worked their magic again, creating posters for the KABK 2015 SHOW. I spoke to Jurgi about his views on young designers: “they should not be decorators”, and the academy: “we offer the classical preparation you need along with a socio-cultural context”.

I guess journalistic credibility urges me to be honest here: I am madly in love with the clothing Jurgi Persoons made. I can’t really name a lot of labels that ever spoke to me on a personal level, but Jurgi Persoons did. His run wasn’t long, just 8 years. They were given innocuous yet shrilling titles such as ‘Re-interpretation of english classic man clothes by a lazy rich girl’ and ‘Anorexic young girl alone in her grandmother’s Benidorm residence’. They were beautiful.

I straight up told him his work is very sought after by a certain niche. The type of people sniping away your ebay-finds. Jurgi Persoons looked at me in disbelief – as if he never had been a designer. Just half an hour earlier he guided me through the neoclassic hallways of the KABK building in The Hague. There he’s been head of the fashion course for a year and a half now. We talked for 2 hours. And he told me, after some pressing, that it was a fun ride but it had to end – the designing. He donated his entire archive to the MoMu in Antwerp and went on to greater things. Here’s what went down:

Cesar Majorana: I heard Ann Demeulemeester is doing loads of gardening and painting now that she’s not heading her own brand. What did you do after quitting yours?

Jurgi Persoons: I stopped in 2003, I was 34 years old, and I had to kick the habit of fashion. I was burned up for a while and needed to find rest again. I needed to make sure there was a world beyond fashion, so I worked at my partner’s printing company. It was nice to have a 9 to 5 job for a while. A job that ends at the right time.

Jurgi answered with a modest tone, something you would expect from a frail man dressed in Comme Des Garçons. However, throughout this conversation there was something that bothered me;

The second Belgian wave of designers, after the Antwerp Six, struggled. I wouldn’t know why. Was it the economic environment? Were the clothes too niche? It took a while for me to have the courage and ask, but I did.

How was it to be part of the generation after the Antwerp Six?

We all had the dream of the Six. We all thought we could be like Dries and Ann. In the 90s a lot of talent graduated with that mentality.

So why did the Six succeed while you didn’t? Most of the second wave designers quit their labels.

The scenario changed too much in a short time. It wasn’t the same as ten years earlier, or later for that fact.

Speaking for myself: I was too young and made too many mistakes. I got offered licenses and deals but refused them, wanting to do it like Dries did. I said “no, Dries also doesn’t do licenses either”. That was bullshit, maybe I should have taken those chances. But then again, I was young and well… you learn those things afterwards – don’t you?

Tell me more about that time.

I always worked with minimal budgets, just taking our bus to Paris and improvising with the money we had. We’d find the best fitting venue for the money we had and would work it out from there. The fashion industry does not allow that nowadays, and just maybe it didn’t back then either.

What was the highlight of all those years?

Well, the brand was booming in America, after working for six years. I have the most beautiful memories of it really. If I told you just one memory I would forget to mention ten others. I met many great people and cherish those times.

What happened?

9/11 happened. My collection was on its way to New York when the first building got hit. The airports were cleared and the collection wasn’t allowed out of the plane. It never left the New York airport. It came back eventually and we showed in Paris with it, but no American felt safe to travel by plane then. We lost all our American clients. 9/11 was a tragedy, it was a big thing for the whole world – and we had to start all over, invest again. We lasted 3 more seasons before calling it quits.

You were a very solitary designer, yet here you’ve helped the academy to become more social. Since you came to the KABK the department has been way more accessible by inviting newspapers and it has started social channels.

When I was a designer I was just way more a recluse. I thought I was guarding myself by doing so. I had this identity of a young designer “I do what I want, not what you’re doing,” which is why I didn’t do runways or editorials. What I do here, with the entire staff, is underlining the value of getting students in contact with professionals, people from the industry. Just creating contacts. You can’t do that by being a recluse. It’s our mission to create opportunities. You cannot seclude yourself anymore now. Fashion is a universal language. It’s understood everywhere, so I feel like I have this obligation to make sure people speak to each other.

What’s the biggest trap for any designer?

A designer gets confronted with realities. And realities are sales numbers, manufacturers and financiers. There’s a business around you. You need to find your own path through that, with or without compromises (in the best case without). Living without compromising is a hard thing to do. There are designers who haven’t had to do that. Look at McQueen or Comme Des Garçons. You also have designers who are overwhelmed by it all. Sometimes you also just evolve, you lose your wildness. Everyone has to manage to get through this path, some don’t survive.

Do you teach these realities at the KABK?

We work on it with the entrepreneurship class. It’s not necessarily the most appreciated class. We try to make it informative, not just a bookkeeping thing, by making it personal: what does this certain garment cost, what is the margin on it?

Was it a class you appreciated in Antwerp?

I had this class twenty years ago and hated it. It always had me thinking: “shall I go today or not?” – Which is why we try to be creative with it now.

What’s the biggest misconception students have when walking into this fashion department?

Students don’t realise that this is a very hard degree. Or at least they don’t realise it enough. It’s a nice career, but a complex one.

The curriculum keeps expanding on all creative academies. Today, designers are not just designing.

This is a job in transition. Society changes quickly, but it doesn’t mean you don’t need your traditional understanding of fabrics – you need that to have a basis with which you can grapple today’s problems. Twenty years ago we didn’t have this because society was much more static.

What is the ideal student then?

First off all, an ideal student is someone with talent, who is ambitious, knows what he/she wants and strives to learn more. An open vision is important – to see what is important for his/her work in the world. Someone who can create engagement.

How do you create this student?

By inspiring, intriguing. Giving input and options: communication really. Fashion is communication.

I heard you use a lot of mood boards, what’s the magic behind them?

It’s an overview of flintstone. You’re never just making clothes, you’re also sending a dispatch – and a message is based on its profundity, so the moodboards are an overview of what inspires depth.

Elaborate…

In the first stage we collect flintstone (this can be anything that travels through your head). Later we bring that together: in this last stage a personal narrative needs to be formed. A way in which it all ties together with the designer, you know.

I spoke to some students in Antwerp and they had their own interns. It strikes me as dubious. Walter (van Beirendonck, head of the Royal Academy in Antwerp) told me he can’t oversee it and doesn’t grade on it.

Yes, it happens. A student has to learn to build a team. I consciously encourage it. A designer learns only so much, you need flintstone from other people. You have to work together, always. It is the company-esque side of it all. If you’re a designer you need a team. You. Need. A. Team. You need people with more technical experience, a better feeling for textiles, make-up or anything really.

So what do you tell students then?

“Fantastic that you have an initial idea of what you want to do, but that doesn’t mean you’re a business genius.” There are exceptions, but I really speak from my own experience here: a designer without a good team is lost. There are designers who can, but these are rare and often don’t end up too well. Find your team.

What do you think about this new rebellious generation in fashion? Aggressive labels like HBA and OFF WHITE?

The new generation has to have something rebellious in them. Otherwise they don’t bring something new. I believe in idealism within fashion. As a young person you have this ambition to change the world. The opposite is always weird: if young people don’t want to be rebellious – what’s the art of designing, then?

It’s an art itself really, to be young properly.

Society, globalisation, social media… the world has become so small. Put your work on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram and you can have the whole world looking at it. These are the opportunities young people should trust in more.

It’s weird to consider that there are labels that are founded on Instagram and only exist there.

That’s just fashion moving forward.

How did you move forward?

For me, that shift happened with show. Front rows, who’s sitting where and the calendar of shows: that was something of which I thought “there has to be something else here”. So I just did presentations off the regular calendar – in the most beautiful places I could think of. I was trying to leave the whole societal hierarchy of glam cult behind. There had to be something else than girls just walking around like this *motions index finger from right to left and back*.

I often get this question myself: why is the Netherlands not a fashion country?

It is cultural. Belgium doesn’t really have it either, I would say. The northern countries have a history in patternmaking and fabrics, but making clothes is something else. Something that you do see in England. Pret-a-porter isn’t embedded in culture here like it is in Italy or France.

Clothing here is function above anything.

Except for those traditional costumes. You have those. They are beautiful.

What inspires you here in The Hague?

Museums and the classic architecture here are to die for. But flintstone lies in everything. It doesn’t have to be something pretty. It can be something that disgusts you. Like pollution or actual international social problems, which inspired the poster for the graduate show.

I want to stress this really: fashion is international. Don’t let yourself be contained by any border. Go somewhere. There are no boundaries on this small planet. If you don’t find your thing here, go somewhere else.

So why would someone go here?

What draws students here is the interaction between textile and fashion, which is quite unique. Our course is unusual in the sense that we offer the classical preparation that you need, along with a socio-cultural context. It allows you to question what is happening now, in the entire world, while also positioning yourself towards it: e.g. “What does your relationship with society look like?”

That differs from the age old paradox where students go to an academy where they spend 5 years making collections, but essentially they are removed from the world for those years.

And that is a problem. Because that approach gives you designers without a relevant message. A designer cannot live with tunnel vision, but has to have an open vision towards society. A designer who only sits at a table will tell you a very scary story: something between his/her head and the table.

A fashion designer is not an artist. He or she is a designer, creating something temporary that has to be used and will decay. An article of use.

There seems more recognition of what fashion is here.

That’s because depth is important to us. As a designer you cannot have enough depth; a collection with depth will always be relevant. Especially in this time, with so many horrible things happening in the world. Make your point. The worst designer is someone who is only making ‘nice’ things – you’re just a decorator then.


Same bad (in my opinion) interviewer as the Walter one on the last page but some interesting words from Jurgi.
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Suquida » Wed Nov 18, 2015 4:33 pm

This is actually my first time hearing his voice lol, I liked this interview, I think he seems more serious than I'd expected him to be?

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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby mellownyellow » Thu Nov 19, 2015 6:06 am

Some Margiela for Hermes runway looks from 2000 and 2001:

Some of these are from the videos linked above. I love how happy and fun the models look, the diverse casting and the simple hair and make-up. I particularly love the looks with the knee high, flat boots under structured knee length skirts. I feel like that is a good, albeit small example of the way Margiela's constant challenging and questioning of fashion was effortlessly meshed with a brand like Hermes.

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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Iliam » Fri Nov 20, 2015 7:44 am

from an interview with Christophe Lemaire in Many of Them Vol. III [This Must Be The Place]:

- And are the archives of Margiela important for Hermès?

Yes, they are treasures! Marginal is like Yves Saint Laurent, when you find pieces of Saint Laurent, Margiela, Alaïa or Miyake it is the same, you feel emotion when you see the clothes. I look at the clothing in the archives, but there is also a beautiful history of objects as well. But I would say the strength of Hermès is even more about the working spirit.

- When Margiela worked for Hermès I really felt he was still being Margiela..

Back in the day it was not successful, people did not get it except visionaries, it was extremely radical. It was always the same season after season. I think for four seasons he showed the same three or four pieces, it was an extreme expression of this idea of a timeless wardrobe for a woman. And it was kind of a shock for people.
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Iliam » Mon Nov 30, 2015 2:14 pm

Mark Borthwick for Maison Martin Margiela

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Borthwick has done a lot of photos for Margiela here are some of them now:

i-D, The Outlook Issue, April 1997

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Hermès by Martin Margiela, Harper’s Bazaar June 1998

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Hermès AW '99-'00 by Martin Margiela, Purple magazine Winter '99-'00


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‘Size 74 Collection’ , Purple magazine 2000

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Amber’s New clothes, Nylon Magazine 2000

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2000-1 Maison Martin Margiela by Mark Borthwick

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(I have no idea what the image order for the book is)


Spoiler:
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Mark Borthwick / Maison Martin Margiela (Untitled) L'Eau (Video)

Spoiler:
[vimeo]http://www.vimeo.com/92124759[/vimeo]
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