De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Thu Jan 16, 2014 5:01 pm

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CETTE CHEMISE EST PRESENTEE A PLAT ET LES PLIS DE REPASSAGE SONT PERMANENTS. LE COL, AMOVIBLE, SE FIXE AVEC DES BOUTONS EN PLASTIQUE. LES BOUTONS DE MANCHETTE SONT AUSSI EN PLASTIQUE.


THIS SHIRT IS PRESENTED IN FLAT AND CREASES ARE PERMANENT. COLLAR, REMOVABLE AND CAN BE FIXED WITH PLASTIC BUTTONS. CUFFLINKS ARE ALSO PLASTIC.
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Sat Jan 18, 2014 8:28 pm

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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Sun Jan 26, 2014 4:00 pm

Visited the fashion museum in Antwerp today for their 50th anniversary exhibition. Saw some amazing pieces from various graduates, students and alumni including classic runway outfits from the Six. Also a huge array of their drawings and work as a student, videos, etc.

Have some nice stuff to write up from the accompanying booklet.

Some history of the Academy, part 1:


1963-1972

During the turbulent 1960s, the fashion and theatre costume department of the Antwerp Royal Academy of Fine Arts was founded. This decision reflected director Mark Macken's intention to offer a wider range of applied arts. The creation of the fashion program was not greeted with unanimous applause. Many hold the opinion that fashion does not belong at a traditional art academy. However, Macken stands fast and recognises that there is room for a type of fashion education that enters into a dialogue with the other departments of the Academy, while ensuring that it distinguishes itself from already existing technical dressmaking programs.

He appoints Mary Prijot, pianist and artist, as the head of the new department. Under her leadership the department of decorative and fashion drawings develops into a fully-fledged training program in fashion drawing with a distinct focus on the graphic aspect of the design process. Mary Prijot is a classically trained artist and her conception of fashion holds French elegance in very high regard - her shining example is Gabrielle "Coco" Chanel.

As part of the curriculum the students also visit fashion capitals like Paris and London, for Prijot believes that a broad artistic-cultural foundation is essential to beocoming a good designer. In these cities, the students come into contact with the fashions and revolts at the end of the sixties. Although Prijot thinks it is necessary to be modern and fashionable, she is not interested in street and protest fashion. At that moment, the artistic scene of the Wolstraat is booming in Antwerp. The fashion students do not take part. They trot around looking smart and elegant and have little in common with the hippies and pravos that populate the other art programs. They are regarded as outsiders by their fellow students from other disciplines.

The end of year show of the department takes place in the cafeteria and the winter garden of the Academy. During the show everyone - both theatre and fashion design - uses the same music; it is tape Prijot borrows from fur seller Benoit. Already at this early stage of the program big names such as Jo Wijckmans, Linda Loppa and Fred Debouvry graduate. When still a student, Marthe Van Leemput is hired as coupe instructor. Over the following years she becomes Prijot's right hand.

1973-1982

In 1975 a praising article about the fashion department is published in the Dutch magazine Avenue entitled "With Both Feet In The Clouds". The article attracts more visitors to the end of year shows and inspires Walter Van Beirendonck, Marina Yee and Martin Margiela to enrol in the fashion department. During their school years they look up to alumna Phara Van den Broeck who rebels against the classical vision of Mary Prijiot. Hieron Pessers joins the teaching staff and adds quite the artistic flair to the courses in drape.

In Antwerp an international punk movement comes onto the scene, attracting visitors from various countries. The artistic scene around the squat "Today's Place" inspires a few of the Six - the first generation of students who collective[ly] make their international breakthrough, i.e. Ann Demeulemeester, Dries Van Noten, Walter Van Beirendonck, Marina Yee, Dirk Van Saene and Dirk Bikkembergs - and Martin Margiela into exploring their limits. As a group they greatly experiment with musical, cultural and fashion-inspired excursions which give them new perspectives. However, Mary Prijot is not a fan of this avant-gardistic approach and during the graduation of 1981, during which four of the Six graduate, a confrontation ensues between the students and the director owing to their different views on the changing image of fashion. Their desire for experimentation cannot be curbed by Mrs Prijot's rules; the international revolutions in the fashion world also make themselves felt in Antwerp.

In 1982, Mary Prijot retires and graphic artist Josette Janssens takes her place. To a large extent she continues Mary Prijot's pedagogical vision on harmony and colour composition. That same year Linda Loppa starts teaching.

1983-1992

During the eighties, Belgian fashion gains real momentum thanks to the Textile Plan of the Beglian government, which originally intended to breathe new life into the ailing textile industry. The domestic success of the Six of Antwerp in the Golden Spindle (Gouden Spoel) competitions and the campaigns of the ITCB (Institution for Textiles and Clothing Belgium) under the leadership of Helena Ravijst do not go unnoticed, although the Belgian press does not always 'get' the Antwerp designers.

In 1986 they experience their first international breakthrough during the British Designer Show in London. This success also resounds in the fashion department. New generations of talented designers (including "The Furious Fashion Five") come to study in Antwerp and receive international coverage in fashion magazines like i-D.

After the premature death of Josette Janssens in 1985, Linda Loppa takes over and emphasizes individual style and avant-garde. She also takes steps to internationalise and professionalise the department. Also in 1985, Walter Van Beirendonck joins the teaching facility. Together they bring in a breath of fresh air to the artistic vision of the fashion department, allowing for a more avant-garde and international orientation. In addition, during the eighties Mia Schneiders, Chris d'Hondt, Walda Pairon, Nellie Nooren, Nina Onzia and Anne Kurris become staff members of the teaching team. In 1989, in honour of the 25th anniversary of the fashion department, the MUHKA (Museum of Contemporary Art Antwerp) organises a homage to Mary Prijot. That year the fashion show takes place at the Trade Fair.

The end of the eighties is marked by a split between the department of the theatre costume design and the fashion department. Under the leadership of Andrei Ivaneanu - who has, amongst others, Nina Onzia and Riet Verbeelen amongst his teaching staff - the department of theatre costumes goes its own way.
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby rublev » Sun Jan 26, 2014 5:08 pm

I loved the exhibition. I think my favourite thing was perhaps the video screens showing current students through the years. Very inspiring stuff!

That or the Patrick Van Ommeslaeghe AW99 collection video which i watched a couple of times. Really wish i could find images from that collection as i fell in love.
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Thu Jan 30, 2014 12:41 pm

Marie Claire Belgium, Nov 1984:

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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Fri Jan 31, 2014 8:22 pm

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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Fri Jan 31, 2014 8:39 pm

Margiela

SS83 (Golden Spindle competition)

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SS97

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SS90

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Van Beirendonck

SS83

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SS98

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Ethnic costume by Walter van Beirendonck, modelled by Dries van Noten, 1979.

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The third year class designed a collection of ethnically inspired designs. According to Heynssens, these projects were added to the curriculum after van Leemput returned from a holiday in Greece where she had witnessed local dress customs. Marthe van Leemput shared her experiences with Prijot who liked the idea and integrated the project into the third year curriculum. Students were required to complete five adult silhouettes, and for a time, two to three children’s costumes based on ethnic-inspired ensembles.


A.F. Vandevorst

AW90

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An Vandevorst's 4th year collection, '91

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By the early 1990s, when An Vandevorst graduated, the shows were highly professional and, in her case, spectacular. Inspired by the work of Joseph Beuys, Vandevorst showed a collection built around military silhouettes and materials closely associated with the artist’s practice, such as felt and khaki. Although the beginning of the display was quite raw and dark, by the end, the models were walking silhouetted against strong light with white feathers cascading from the ceiling. The response was overwhelming.
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Fri Jan 31, 2014 8:41 pm

Maison Martin Margiela 1997

The first solo exhibition by Maison Martin Margiela. The exhibition is held in the “glass pavillon” of the museum, built in the 1980’s, that adjoins a rose garden and a large decorative pond. Eighteen dressed dummies represent all previous Martin Margiela Collections (Spring/Summer 1989 up to Autumn/Winter 1997/98). Garments chosen from each season are specially reproduced in whites, creams and greys. A collaboration with a prominent Dutch Microbiologist Dr. A.W.S.M van Egeraat, Professor at the Wareningen Agricultural University, The Netherlands. Each outfit is treated with different strains of bacteria, yeast and mould, all isolated from the air and nurtured to provide varying colours and textures. Over the first five days of the exhibition these organisms develop on the clothes and, once their gestation period is complete, change the colour and aspect of the garments. All eighteen silhouettes remain on the exterior of the pavilion and may only be viewed from the inside through its glass structure.


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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Mippipopolous » Tue Feb 04, 2014 11:22 am

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Platypus from SF, owner of Suspension Point, posted this little teaser of some more stuff from Schneider's F/W14.

Really nice collection and as always, a great (and wide) selection of fabrics and colors.

I though the various shades, tones, and textures of grey were particularly good.

There are some lovely, really comfortable heavy knit wools (I know a number of you have been asking for heavy knits without the various mohair blends).


Sounds promising along with the what we've seen. Can't wait to get better looks at all these pieces. SP will be doing their preorders too soon he said.
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Mippipopolous » Thu Feb 27, 2014 10:41 am

No Man Walks Alone has a nice selection of Schneider's SS14 online. The pictures really give you a better sense of some of the items than the lookbook did, lot of lovely little details that you'd otherwise miss. I'm in love with the hooded cardigan, will definitely be on the hunt for it when sales roll around. Love the thread of darker grey woven into it, the material just looks great too.

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I really like this scarf a lot too.

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Really think this was a strong SS for Schneider, nice to see some stores with good buys from it. Still haven't seen anyone who picked up the short-sleeve sweater though, that looked excellent in the lookbook and I'd love to see closer pictures.
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Mon Mar 10, 2014 10:52 am

This coat though

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Looking forward to hitting up antwerp after next payday and seeing what's what!
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Sun Mar 30, 2014 8:14 am

Schneider upped their shopping bag game

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Leather straps with the brand name printed on in gold. v lux.

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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby can- » Thu Apr 24, 2014 6:17 pm

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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Fri May 23, 2014 11:05 am

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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Fri Jun 06, 2014 1:49 pm

BAM! magazine, launched in '88 to promote the Belgian (Antwerp) fashion scene and encapsulate its radical, edgy and aggressive ideas and visions. Put together by Academy graphic design graduate Anne Kurris it's pretty hard to track down or find information about but there's a few sets of images of the first three editions online.

BAM NO.1

BAM NO.2

BAM NO.3


The themes in BAM! are characteristic of the style vocabulary of the Six: fetishwear and S&M, youth subcultures (new beat, acid), ethnic and oriental inspirations, androgyny, pin-up girls, body-builders and an obsession with bad taste. The magazine mixed fashion with other cultural fields — photography (Robert Mapplethorpe), theatre (Jan Fabre), artists (Jan Hoet) — in a postmodern blend, referencing Jacques Derrida.


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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Wed Jun 11, 2014 5:14 am

Dries Van Noten on his SS91 collection.

Most fashion companies lost a great deal sales-wise because American retailers slashed their spring/summer 1991 orders as the country went to [the Gulf] war in January. Van Noten experienced that and more: "That season," he says, "I made the collection inspired by Iraq and Iran" -- having conceived and designed it before Iraq invaded Kuwait. As it happens, he says, "we have a system where jacket names begin with a B for blazer, and skirts are with an S for skirt, so that season the blazers were called Baghdad, the skirts were called Saddam, and so on. All the shipments to New York were blocked in customs because the papers were filled with names of cities of Iraq and Saddam."

"That," he says quietly, "nearly caused us bankruptcy."
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Sun Jun 29, 2014 11:26 am

Ann Demeulermeester, 1996 Carte Blance. Tables designed for Mechelen based furniture company Bulo.

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The table is covered in a white painter's canvas, an invitation for heavy use and for it to be painted on, drawn on and worked on. The concept of art, design and process transferring to everyday items. The canvas can be painted white again to reset it back to its purer form.
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby can- » Sun Jun 29, 2014 11:21 pm

Margiela 5 zip puffer (xpost to speckle thread)

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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby popcorn » Mon Jun 30, 2014 1:40 am

Found A Magazine Curated By Jun Takahashi in the Undercover thread. A Magazine is a Belgian magazine that invites a designer to create each issue.
Or, in their own words...

A Magazine Curated By is a fashion magazine that explores the universe of a chosen fashion designer in each issue. We invite a guest curator – an international fashion designer, group or house – to develop innovative, personalised content to express their aesthetic and cultural values. Each issue celebrates this designer’s ethos: their people, their passion, their stories, emotions, fascinations, spontaneity and authenticity.


The first issue was curated by Maison Martin Margiella, and is a cool 212 pages long. It is easily available on their website, alongside all other issues.

http://www.amagazinecuratedby.com/issue ... -margiela/

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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby JtotheWhat » Mon Jun 30, 2014 9:45 am

This might be my favorite forum thread ever (on any forum) I have found myself coming back to look at the whole thread more times than I can count.
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Iliam » Sat Jul 19, 2014 2:36 am

Found an exhibition review of the Maison Martin Margiela "20" Exhibition (2009) at MoMu by Paoloa Di Trocchio in the journal Fashion Theory

Some interesting sections:

The titles for the themed sections were developed collaboratively by Maison Martin Margiela and the curators Kaat Debo and Bob Ver- helst, each adding, subtracting, or renaming sections in a considered process. Martin Margiela is one of the most over-interpreted contemporary designers [<--pretty hostile?]. The text-based advertising poster that provides a dictionary meaning of “Maison Martin Margiela” makes a tongue-in-cheek reference to the forced descriptors, such as minimalist or grunge, that journalists and academics have loaded the style of the work with.

In the exhibition, the Maison took the opportunity to create its own classifications. For example, the team consciously rejected the term deconstruction, and adopted destroy. Destroy does not contain the duality or complications of the term deconstruction, which has its foundations in literary theory and translates uncomfortably to fashion. Instead, destroy is active and evocative.


The organization of the exhibition seems interesting/ revealing about and a continuation of Margiela's aesthetic:

The themed sections in the exhibition either dwell on one idea, or reveal a progression of concepts. The first sections “Introduction,” “Incognito,” and “Paint” relate to concealment; first of the designer, then the team, and then the items they design. In “Introduction” the Margiela team is represented in a “portrait” of generic blank white silhouettes shaped from Styrofoam, and identified simply by their nationality (see Figure 2). The house’s namesake is not included. Martin Margiela has consistently refused public appearances since 1988. “Incognito” and “Paint” feature the team’s accessories and clothing shrouded in paint, masking tape or cotton covers, a playful strategy that incidentally highlights the undulations and idiosyncrasies of the object beneath.


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“Destroy” and “Tailoring/Production Process” incorporate clothing that use recuperated materials or reference the materials associated with production processes in the dressmaker’s atelier, such as visible frayed linings, unfinished seams, and garments that suggest holes and wear. The “Artisanal collection” is isolated in a darkened room, with garments made from generic second-hand garments such as leather sandals or odd buttons, revealed momentarily with text boldly announcing the hours spent in construction, before disappearing into darkness. The timed displays highlight the objects’ exclusivity and the inconsistency of the materials emphasizes their individuality. The “Artisanal collection” is the Maison’s response to haute couture and conceives luxury in terms of hours spent in construction, rather than precious materials or status symbols. This reference to the handmade is also synonymous with haute couture

“Classical Wardrobe/The Trench Coat” deliberates on the Maison’s reincarnations of one idea, the trench coat, an archetypical form from the canon of twentieth-century Western fashion reconceptualized in order to display the Maison’s skill in expert tailoring in combination with its avant-garde tendencies (see Figure 3). The Maison’s intimate knowledge of the history of Western fashion informs each of their avant-garde designs. Alternatively, “Tailoring/Shoulders” presents a succession of approaches, displaying iconic shoulder lines from Spring/ Summer 1989 to Fall/Winter 2008. These busts were made by the Maison in white canvas specifically for the exhibition and were mounted on plinths (see Figure 4). An unconventional and highly effective solution, they present the advantage curators can have by working with contemporary designers, as the busts successfully highlight the progression of the Maison’s signature silhouettes.


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re: MMM shop design (quoted from the exhibition catalog):
In the Maison Martin Margiela shops, optical illusions are generated with black-and-white photographs of the interiors of their previous office spaces on the rue du Faubourg Poissonnière, an 18th century Hotel particulier. The rooms of this building, including such details as baroque mirrors, marble mantelpieces, decorative frames and rosettes, were photographed before the Maison moved to their current location on rue Saint Maur. This way, Margiela and his team carry their own history with them to each new location of store. In other words, the frequent presence of trompe l’oeil has proven an outstanding metaphor for Maison Martin Margiela’s complex relationship with time and history. (Debo 2008)


The exhibition design also reflected this playfulness by including trompe l'oeil photographs of MoMu's space on the gallery walls and by including cardboard photographs of male models from MMM shows in cardboard silhouettes "sipping champagne on a dance floor amongst disco balls".

Interesting curatorial approach:
The exhibition was still unresolved at its opening, featuring torsos and mannequins covered in calico cloths labeled “NEW COLLECTION S/S 09 PRESENTATION 2/10/08 – 7PM.” The exhibition opened shortly before Maison Martin Margiela’s twentieth-anniversary collection, and items from that collection would be installed in the exhibition after its presentation. This detail again demonstrated how MoMu’s curatorial approach reflected the Maison’s philosophy. The Maison animates objects showing their transformation over time, while at MoMu, the exhibition was animated, with the addition of objects after its opening.

The Maison’s preoccupation with disguise murmured throughout the whole exhibition, as does its consistent play with the conventions of fashion. For example, in a Maison Martin Margiela store in Paris a woman returned to exchange a jacket she had bought earlier that week because the button was missing. “But I wasn’t sure if the button was actually missing,” she said to the sales assistant, who stood in their white lab coat. “It would be just like Margiela to put a buttonhole with no button.” Maison Martin Margiela “20” The Exhibition persistently forced the viewer to question what it was they were seeing. A wallet appeared as a wad of cash, a duvet as a jacket. This is pushed so far that even conventional details, such as the presence of a button alongside a button hole, become questionable, both challenging and entertaining the viewer, as did the exhibition. The exhibition’s success rests on its adoption of the Maison’s philosophy in its curatorial approach, creating a provocative dialogue between the objects and their display.


sounds like a lot of the revision, reworking, and po-faced humour that are part of MMM clothing were nicely included in the exhibition design.
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Sun Jul 20, 2014 10:21 am

Marvelous Martin
PARIS—Martin Margiela may be the next, long-awaited rising star on the Paris fashion front. And he’s not even French. The 31-year-old Belgian certainly has good credentials. He graduated with the Six from Antwerp from the Belgian Royal Academy of Fine Arts and spent three years as an assistant to Jean-Paul Gaultier. He struck out on his own last year and packed in the fashion hounds for his first collection last October.
Margiela’s style could be labeled avant garde, but, for him, the highest compliment is simply “different.” Kal Ruttenstein, Bloomingdale’s senior vice-president who rushed over to the showroom after last Thursday night’s presentation, called the collection, “fabulous, young, exciting, very original, tongue-in-cheek and irreverent.” That’s more than has been said about any new designer for quite some time. The store bought a sampling of everything in the 50-piece collection.

The quiet but self-assured Margiela turns fashion inside out and often upside down. “I react against everything that’s chic and traditional. If you don’t revolt, then you don’t go anywhere,” he said.

His style, he adds, is composed of “everything I couldn’t do as a kid and everything I like.”

The collection is based on the traditional English tailoring which Margiela loves. Jackets, vests, pants and shirts are done in men’s wear fabrics like twill, shetland, corduroy and denim in shades of brown. The irreverent twist in is the tailoring and the cut.

But it’s his new shoulder proportion that excited Ruttenstein. Margiela got so tired of shoulder lines which obscured the real thing that he pulled his in toward the neck and raised them slightly with crescent roll-shaped padding. “I wanted a very narrow shoulder that showed the natural line underneath.”

His slightly 18th-century shapes feminize his jackets and heavy woolen coats, which have men’s wear-style handstiched lapels and ribbons to pull them back closer to the body. These fitting ribbons are sewn on the outside of many shapes. Several jackets are worn completely “inside out,” seams and all. Margiela simply wraps some coats with duct tape to get the shape he wants.

He takes waistcoats, lengthens them to the ankle and puts them over full-length cotton shirts which have men’s wear-style pleats at the neckline. He likes shirt and sweater sleeves extra long to fold back over the jacket. He even has separate tied-on sleeves to wear as alternatives.

Wool pants get another treatment — the hip area is in lining fabric with a drawstring waist or features an attached skirt. “I attach them so that I’m sure the customer will wear my look,” he said.

Wool pants or jeans were cut up the inseam and turned into full-length skirts similar to the ones girls made themselves in the Seventies. The most basic pants have horizontally ironed creases.

Hemlines, though, are not an issue — there are none.

"There’s no problem with lengths — you just cut the hems," explains Margiela. He prefers scissors and darts to seams so that "You can see a body under the clothes even when no one is wearing them, like worn jeans."

Darts give shape to knees, elbows, bodices and derrieres. He cut and darted his bicolor ribbed knit sweaters, making graphic patterns. “They said I was crazy,” he remarks of his Italian manufacturers, whose name he won’t disclose.

When the sweater necks were too big, he stitched them with darts, too. Other sequined sweaters were washed to get that beaten, worn feeling. Margiela took his scissors to shearling, chopping it into reversible patchwork coats which Ruttenstein called “incredible.”

This collection is clearly not for everyone — and Margiela doesn’t pretend it is: “It’s for a tiny group of women, and not everyone will like it. It’s important to do what you want, and there will always be some people who agree.” While Margiela hasn’t made any style concessions to commercial concerns, “We did everything possible to keep prices down,” he says.

Elizabeth Allen
22 March 1989
WWD
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby can- » Sun Jul 20, 2014 12:18 pm

thought this was gonna be about Matthieu blazy
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Fri Jul 25, 2014 10:23 am

Schneider AW14 stuff is starting to go up on stockists like WrongWeather and Browns. Some decent pieces already.

This jumper isn't my cup of tea as a piece but looks really very good worn on the model. Reckon lots of lads could do this piece fierce justice.

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This coat is a bit weird but the material looks really funky.

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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Fri Jul 25, 2014 10:27 am

Pretty jealous of how good the Dries Van Noten AW14 women's collection is starting to look. Excited to see this stuff in person, more so than the men's.

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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Sat Jul 26, 2014 12:15 pm

Maison Martin Margiela store in Tokyo - housed in a former electronics factory.

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Old storage boxes from the factory.

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Standing clothes rack with wheels mounted high on the wall.

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In-store cinema playing videos of collections.

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Tabi wax candles on the table. Note the wallpaper, designed as a paint-by-numbers.

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Old suitcases and trolley painted and repurposed as tables.

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Shoeboxes used to display shoes.
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby charybdis » Sat Jul 26, 2014 10:20 pm

What do you all think of this review of the recent Margiela collection where Suzy Menkes reveals that Matthieu Blazy designed the collection?

I mean, she's kinda arguing that Blazy should get credit for the work but revealing who he is kinda goes against the whole Margiela design philosophy. Although, the fact that he was the designer is apparently common knowledge so IDK if she's even breaking any news at all.
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my mother is a kenzo fish sweater
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Iliam » Sat Jul 26, 2014 11:10 pm

@charybdis

i think you're right. this push towards naming and praising blazy individually does seem contrary to margiela's reclamation of the "anonymous artisan" and the value of the collective. i won't be surprised to find that it's mostly a financial decision. from a marketing point of view, it's so much easier to build and sell a brand's identity when it's attached to designer's persona than it is to "sell" anonymity. revealing blazy also creates attention for the brand in the form of news stories, media reports and so on and clearly signals a "new era" and narrative for MMM. everyone likes the young rising star narrative, and obviously suzy menkes is buying it. in the end though, as long as the clothes are interesting, should we care who's designing them?

might be worth sacrificing it just for this image though
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@syeknom thanks for the article link and the photo. how does the tokyo store compare with the one in brussels?
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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Iliam » Sat Jul 26, 2014 11:45 pm

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@charybdis yes, 'they' (Renzo Rosso?) are allowing access to blazy at any rate

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The Maison Martin Margiela Atelier during Couture (http://www.anothermag.com/current/view/3751/Exclusive_The_Maison_Martin_Margiela_Atelier_during_Couture)

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Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby pirxthepilot » Sun Jul 27, 2014 8:03 am

it is a tricky one because the idea of margiela as collective was a deliberate attempt to emphasise the industrial nature of fashion production and a reaction against the legacy of romanticism that stresses the visionary individual as the fount of creativity, which i completely agree with... at the same time, the people who do much of the actual work within fashion houses are often under-paid and recognised, perhaps menkes was simply trying to address that.
(in this connection, great to see nadege vanhee finally getting what she deserves..!)
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