De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Clothes

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby bels » Sun Jul 27, 2014 1:22 pm

Quite like the Snider hidden placket shirts up on Wrong Weather. Might reach for some this winter sales if any of them get to sales.


Image
Image
  • 4

Image
User avatar
bels
Yung Winona
 
Posts: 5071
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 2:43 pm
Reputation: 18822

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Thu Jul 31, 2014 12:53 pm

Image

Image

A typical egg box holds a white egg inspired by fortune cookies. Once cracked, the egg reveals an unexpected message.
Disinfected hen egg from France. Made in France.


Available online.
  • 6

User avatar
Syeknom
 
Posts: 2109
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 4:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam
Reputation: 7983

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Wed Aug 06, 2014 11:38 am

Around the world with Dries Van Noten

Dries frequently bases and themes his collections on farflung countries, cultures and worlds. A big fan of travelling, he likes to build collections on an imagined trip somewhere (preferring the idea of an imagined trip with all of its clichés and historical inspirations to taking directly from real life). Let's visit the world with him a little shall we.

Spain / Cuba / Mexico

Spoiler:
Toreros, bright pastel buildings, ruffled shirts, flowing skirts, salsa, picasso, beating sun, mojitos

Key collections
Women's SS2001 - Mexico
Men's SS2004 - Cuba
Men's SS2006 - Spain
Women's SS2012 - Spain / Photoprint / Reeve



Image

Image

Image

Image

ImageImage

ImageImage

Image

Image

Image

Image

ImageImage

Image

ImageImageImageImage

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

ImageImageImage

Image

Image

Image

Image

ImageImage

Image







Image
  • 9

User avatar
Syeknom
 
Posts: 2109
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 4:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam
Reputation: 7983

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Thu Aug 07, 2014 3:57 pm

Afghanistan

Image

Spoiler:
Autumn-Winter 1997 (both shows) - Afghanistan

Dries' Afghanistan is not the bleak, desolate, wartorn region we think of today but both a reminiscence of the thriving country as it was in the mid-twentieth century (Zahir Shah's reign) and a celebration of traditional Afghan dress. The Taliban had only recently seized power in the country at the time and the collection must have been jolly timely as oppressively conservative military rule clamped down on the people. Beautifully ornate Eastern prints, glittering gold leaf and golden jewelery, flowing robes, skirts and draped scarves. The men's show featured a lot of oversized jackets, prominent scarves and beanies mimicking traditional Qara Qoli hats.

Do feel like there were some missed opportunities to explore the unique and fascinating world of Afghani dress in greater detail but the collections were clearly only inspired by the region as opposed to aping it wholesale.



Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image
  • 7

User avatar
Syeknom
 
Posts: 2109
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 4:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam
Reputation: 7983

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Sat Aug 23, 2014 5:07 am

Image
  • 4

User avatar
Syeknom
 
Posts: 2109
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 4:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam
Reputation: 7983

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Sun Sep 07, 2014 4:05 am

Went to Antwerp yesterday. Saw the Raf-Ruby shop and took bad photos with my tablet like a dork.

Huge warehousey space, decorated sparsley with the american flag arches that ruby did for the show. Dark Side Of The Moon echoing around the place on repeat.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

The opening of the shop was a party friday night that I couldn't go to (too late for trains, had other commitments) but I was talking to someone who went and apparently Dries was there along with a bunch of other modeontwerper types (think An Vandevorst was there too).

Later in the evening I went to a party at my favourite second-hand/overstock store and hung with the fashion-scene crowd of Antwerp all night - was a load of fun. Very strange to be amongst so many people all wearing recognisable designer garms (too many margiela stitches to count). Got some compliments on the high-risedness of my trews. Felt good about my outfit in general, worked well. Was still too awkward to talk to many people there but the ones I did were lovely.

Spent all night trying not to buy anything but genuinely have no willpower so bought a Schneider cardi-jacket thing overstocked from AW13

Image

Telling myself it fills an important hole in my wardrobe which it probably does to be fair.

At the 11th hour (well, 10th) I learned that Raf's atelier is the nondescript building across from that shop, that Raf hangs around smoking outside it often (when in Antwerp, he splits his time between there and Paris) and is super friendly. Oh my.
  • 14

User avatar
Syeknom
 
Posts: 2109
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 4:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam
Reputation: 7983

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby bels » Sun Sep 07, 2014 4:52 am

Parka looks cool, how much.
  • 3

Image
User avatar
bels
Yung Winona
 
Posts: 5071
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 2:43 pm
Reputation: 18822

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby chadnik » Sun Sep 14, 2014 8:56 pm

Just discovered Sofie D'Hoore, am quite enchanted. She graduated from the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in the late '80s, but her first career was as a dentist, which seems possibly borne out by her clean lines and eye for precision, and attention to detail in beautiful fabrics. From her LinkedIn (...?)

Fabric is the starting point for every collection. Each season, the designer researches hundreds of textiles before making the choices that will influence her designs; only then does she begin to sketch. The integrity of the materials is paramount.

Underpinning everything is an obsessive attention to detail in terms of the cut, construction and craftmanship of each garment. For Sofie D'Hoore, how the clothes feel when worn is as important as how they look. Her work is about freedom in the broadest sens. Her clothes are always elegant and feminine, but allow great liberty of movement. Every garment is created so that it is comfortable, practical and easy to wear.


She seems to not be stocked in many places in the US, but Syeknom informs me that she's quite easy to find in Belgium. Would love to hear/see/learn more about her (I saw her listed in your book, germinal?). Some of my favorite looks so far:

Image

Spoiler:
Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image
  • 6

User avatar
chadnik
 
Posts: 225
Joined: Fri May 16, 2014 7:15 pm
Reputation: 1907

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Mon Sep 15, 2014 4:36 pm

@chadnik

There are only two pages of the book dedicated to her unfortunately; you may have seen them already, nonetheless, here's a transcription:

Once a fully qualified dentist, Sofie d'Hoore's changed her ambitions completely to fashion. After training at a textile school in Ghent and two years at the Antwerp Fashion Academy, she was ready to go to work for one or two Belgian commercial labels. She rounded out her knowledge of materials with a course in pattern design. Her first women;s collections saw the light of day in 1991.

Her strength lies in her shapes and in her choice of material and colours.

Passionately interested in the structure of clothing, d'Hoore became engrossed in the craft of dressmaking, rediscovering and reworking classical shapes in a styles that was entirely her own. Her patterns are clear and put together logically, always aiming for flexibility. She plays with contrasts between male female forms, such as jogging trousers in taffeta and an evening dress in heavy poplin. She chooses the most beautiful materials, in magnificent wools, cottons , cashmeres and silks.

For the realisation of her designs she demands first-class tailoring, beautifully finished. The use of haute couture techniques such as 'double face' make her coats look as beautiful on the inside as they do on the outside.

Each season she extends her basic colours to provide a distinctive palette. For Winter 1999 white is accompanied by black, grey, beige and navy blue with red, fuchsia and orange.

Her collections are put together ingeniously. Each collection is a coherent whole of vests, trousers, skirts, suits, and coats. Even when combined with one another, the ensembles always look as if they were designed as if a single silhouette.

D'Hoore has a contemporary feel for combining luxury with comfort, city clothes with sportswear. She succeeds in showing that luxury can be very simple and simplicity very luxurious.


For @charybdis, the summary for A.F. Vandevorst provides some context for the image you posted elsewhere:

A.F. Vandevorst stands for
(A)rickx (F)ilip and An (Vandevorst).

Both graduated from the Antwerp Royal Academy of Fine Arts in 1991. They first gained experience by working for several Belgian designers but the wish to start their own collection proved persistent. In March 1998, A.F. Vandevorst finally had their moment, staging a splendid show in Paris, presenting their first Autumn-Winter 1998-1999 collection. The years of building up experience and reflection came to the surface in a very mature, warm and feminine collection. The use of felt, the pure fabrics and the red cross referred to the work, life and philosophy of artist Joseph Beuys. The models wore the lingerie from their Nightfall-line underneath the clothes, reinforcing from within the feeling of sensuality and femininity. Cuts or stitchings were here and there replaced by folds and rivets. The overall feminine look was combined with innovation, comfort and wearability.
For A.F. Vandevorst a garment that has been worn, has more 'spirit', more 'soul'. An opinion they assimilated in their Spring-Summer 1999 collection by proposing clothes that look as if they have been slept in. The show took place in an old dormitory, and the clothes were presented by models sleeping in iron hospital beds.
Lauded by the international press and fashion world, the duo received the Venus de la Mode award for most promising designer.
The Autumn-Winter collection 1999-2000 explores the inner struggle and moments of uncertainty that women experience during their lives. Doubt and ambivalence are reflected in the clothes and their materials. Skirts have 'feminine' fronts in fabrics like silk or woollen gauze, while the back is made out of a solid 'protective' felt. Some designs are assemblages of different detachable parts, again emphasising women's sometimes contradictory emotions. Various compositions (feminine, casual, uniform-like) can be made, according to the wearer's mood.
During the show, all models were flaxy separately, to emphasise the different parts of the compositions they were wearing.
During the finale four elderly women were put in the spotlights to stress that doubt and ambivalence are part of any age...


The text is accompanied by two quotes attributed to Joseph Beuys:

The outward appearance of every object I make is the equivalent of some aspect of inner human life.


Questioner: How would you describe your new aesthetic?
Beuys: I described it radically: I say aesthetic = human being.


(One could probably write a book at this point on Beuys's influence on fashion.)

And for @Syeknom:

Veronique Branquinho graduated from the Antwerp Royal Academy of Fine Arts in 1995. Initially she designed for several commercial labels. Then, in October 1997, she launched her first collection, Spring-Summer 1998, in a Paris gallery. Inspired by David Hamilton photographs and movies like Picnic at Hanging Rock and Heavenly Creatures, her collection immediately struck the eye of the international fashion world. A combination of long, flowing silhouettes and masculine tailored jackets, classic suit fabrics and smooth sheer cotton, revealed the ambiguity of so-called innocent girls. From this moment on it was obvious that Veronique Branquinho has a deep and sincere fascination for the interior world of women.

With her second collection - shown in March 1998 as her first show in Paris - her sense for mystery and a dark romanticism became even more apparent. Pleated knee-long skirts with 'off-colour' leggings and turtleneck sweaters were followed by pullovers in rabbit fur and heavy coats and capes with high collars. The models' face were pale, their teeth painted black. The atmosphere referred to the double-life of Laura Palmer in David Lynch's Twin Peaks, to the secrecy of hidden feelings and mysterious nights-out. It seems as if Veronique Branquinho entered the subconscious of girls and women and found a different world. Bringing it to the surface, she superbly blended it with the superficial appearances of 'real life'. This ambiguity remains a characteristic of her subsequent collections. For Spring-Summer 19999 she wrapped women in large sheer rectangular silk and cotton garments. The models' bodies seemed veiled in mist. The Victorian 'governess' blouses and stoles and ponchos that contrast sharply with the black business suits, enhance this ambiguity between the attraction and inaccessibility . One of the main themes in the Autumn-Winter 1999-2000 collection is the different value individuals attach to small, personal changes in their clothes. For a schoolgirl a slightly lifted hem-line or a pair of legwarmers may make the difference while the rest of the world doesn't even notice.

Veronique Branquinho has shown an ability to translate this subtle ambiguity into her collections, and to combine it with the strength and sophistication of a total image.

"The most important thing for me to recognise is that a woman is a very complex person... every woman has a mystery inside her. (...) I like this black side of people. Black minds, black moods, black clothes: I like the word and I like the emotion. That's what I try to reflect. It's romance for the doom generation."


Finally:

Maison Martin Margiela: Responses to question posed by Luc Derycke and Sandra van de Veire / Belgian Fashion Design.

February 12th 1999.

[Begins]

1. About Show (Arena)

The fashion show is the only event during which fashion seems to almost confiscate time and place. Do you consider the actual show as the place where and the moment during which fashion crystallises into its purest and most all-encompassing form? Or do you consider the show as just one of many facets of the making of a collection?

An interim stage of a collection's journey towards the wearer.

A series of selections that end with the selection of the wearer when they integrate a piece or pieces of the particular collection into their personal wardrobe.

A collection has passed through the selection of design and confection at the factory or atelier / garments of the collection are selected, styled and shown by the designer for a show or presentation / boutiques further select for their stock and what they wish to present to their customers / the customers (wearers) select from that selection the pieces they wish to wear.

2. On Metamorphosis (Theatre)

One of the main characteristics of a fashion show is that it is a brief moment during which the collection is in the centre of the arena, attracting all the attention. The collection is presented as a spectacle, a piece of theatre, a performance. Does this performance, this theatrical element play an important role for you?

A point of view expressed on how an entire collection may exist as a self-contained unit before its dissipation.

3. On Language (Junction)

Like words in a language, clothes refer to many different areas of significance. Do you take into account, or rather, do you anticipate how your collection will be read? Do you try to communicate a certain statement with your collections?

Very rarely / No statement removed from the garments themselves. We may only know why we create a collection, how it is perceived and received by others is beyond our control, and thankfully so.

4. On Art (Horizon)

4a. Does Art inspire you? Are there certain attitudes, or statements in the world of art, that have influenced you, or that still influence you?

We prefer to leave the interpretation of our work to others.

4b. Do you consider fashion as an art-form, or is their a clear distinction between the two, or is there are rather thin line between the two - that then again could be transgressed?

Fashion is a craft, a technical know-how and not, in our opinion, an art-form. Each world shares an expression through the creativity though through very divergent media and processes.

4c. It is especially in the display of fashion (shows, photography) that sometimes contemporary art and contemporary fashion meet. Is it this area in particular where boundaries blur?

Possibly.

5. On Style (Definition)

5a. Does the word style still bear any meaning in contemporary fashion? Could one still define certain movements - that go beyond the work of a particular designer - as a style? If so, how would you define style? Is it about form and formal relationships, or rather about significance and the translation of similar ideas and attitudes? Do you consider there to be something one could call a Belgian style?

To each his or her own / Often / An atmosphere, the combination of the wearer and the worn / Translation / A point of view in as much flux as any other.

5b. Do you endeavour to create, through your different collections, a certain style? Or does an individual style emerge automatically? Or is style something that you don't particularly acknowledge, but rather consider to be a label that others attach to your work, a supplement that is added when your collections go public?

Up to others to say/ Up to others to say / Neither one nor the other exclusively and often a result of the two.

6. On Metamorphosis (Displacement)

One could consider fashion as a series of metamorphoses of pieces of clothing. Is metamorphosis an aim in itself, or do you consider there to be external forces that induce these continuous shifts?

Less an aim and more a result.

7. On Body (Pedestal)
The human body is - amongst other things - the pedestal that carries your creations. A mannequin is a rather neutral variant, but a human body, because of its individual nature, and because it moves, is a very complex and different pedestal. Clothes define the image of a body, but the body itself does the same for the clothes it wears. Does the body as a living, moving, carrier also provoke a certain resistance? Do you sometimes consider the body-as-pedestal to be a limitation? Or do you consider the clothes, their silhouette, strong enough to definitely re-define, re-create, change the body (and hence 'elevate' the pedestal)?

It is the unison that matters, the product of an alchemy between the physical and a personality.

8. On Architecture (Construction)
8a. A piece of clothing was drawn, assembled, constructed, and therefore it generates - sometimes complicated - three-dimensional images. It seems to have that in common with architecture. Do you see any relationships between architecture and fashion?

Each is a creative process that understands, surmounts and absorbs physical indications, materials and guidelines while respecting an understood methodology in its expression.

8b. Sometimes the design of a building or of certain clothes seems almost 'timeless'. They seem to be beyond time and space, and to remain contemporary, without us being able to put the finger on exactly why that is. Do you think there is something like an 'abstract' formula, some universal set of scales and measures that can be applied? In other words, what, according to you, constitutes a strong piece of fashion?

No absolute scale / The eye of the beholder and an expertise in execution.

8c. Contrary to architecture, fashion is closely linked to cycles - in two or sometimes four collections a year. Does this influence design process?

Of course, time moves on and the process must close to move on yet again. This, however has more to do with industry timetables than the spirit of clothing. The 'break' between seasons within the industry is somewhat at odds with the flow of an individual's wardrobe from season to season. One should not confuse the garments themselves with the calendar that determines their production.

9. On Street (Arena)
Public space, the street, is the arena where fashion can prove its point. Are reactions from the audience, from the street important for you? Do you allow for feedback from this area during the creative process? Does the street feature as a major area of flintstone for you?

Yes / Usually after / Often, though streets vary

10. On Language (Re-appearance)
Have you come across the situation where the meaning (the language) you had incorporated in your collection was transformed on the 'street'? A situation where your designs were combined with other clothes and were worn in a way that you had not envisaged or meant them to be worn? Does the street transform the appearance of your designs?

If one may call it 'language'... yes! / Yes / The individuals who wear them ... yes.

11. On Function (Pragmatism)
Do you care about the functionality of your designs? Do you design certain clothes with a certain function in mind, to the extent that you adapt your designs according to the function they're meant for? Do you acknowledge the different functions clothes can have? Do you consciously look for activities/functions for which thus far no specific clothes have been designed (New trends in leisure activities. New crafts/jobs)?

Yes, for us this is a very important facet of the challenge in our work / Of course / Yes / From time to time.

12. On Craft (Tradition)
Are tradition and craftsmanship important to you? Do you tend to challenge tradition, to the extent that you stimulate craftsmen to generate new solutions, or in creating new designs that require certain skills that are on the verge of becoming extinct?

Very / When we can.

13. On History (Costumes)
The past is full to the brim with costumes some simple, some bizarre and complex, others merely extravagant. Setting certain standards of craftsmanship is largely due to the creation of costumes in the past. Do you consider this tradition still existent in the way clothes are made nowadays? To what extent are historical costumes a source of flintstone for you?

On many levels of our craft, yes / From time to time.

14. On History (Transitions)
Which were the most difficult hurdles you had to overcome when you started creating your own collections? Which designers from the past - who have now stopped designing new collections - do you value and have influenced you?

Commencing independently and remaining so / Those with an authentic approach to their own work, as much from the past as from the present.

15. On Codes (Social)
The look of traditional costumes has to a great extent been defined by social codes. These social codes may have developed and altered, but they are still visible in the way we dress today. Do you acknowledge these social codes? Do you sometimes on purpose try to break down certain social codes with your designs?

Not resolutely but, often, yes / When we can.

16. On Bareness (The Invisible Body)
Public nudity is still a big taboo. Clothes are supposed to cover the body. Nevertheless, clothes also display the body, and sometimes even emphasise its nakedness. Is the veiled/revealed naked body an important aspect of clothing for you?

Many attitudes and states have ... their 'moment'.

17. On Material (The Second Skin)
Clothes can be though of as our second skin. The material of the clothes, the cloth used, does not only define the visual appearance, but also how it can be used, how it can be worn, and - most of all - how it feels. Is the choice of materials an important aspect in the design process? Do your designs start with the material, after which you focus on the form or does it happen the other way round? Is your choice of materials a purely pragmatic one, or does it define part of your creative thinking?

Rather the final layer than a second skin.

18. On Craft (Tailoring)
How important are comfort, the cut, tailoring for you?

Very.

19. On Metamorphosis (Sculpture)
A dressed body is a transformed naked body, certain pieces of clothing enhance its sculptural quality. The body can be a mere excuse for a more abstract investigation into materials and form. Do you envisage your designs as sculptures, that - when worn - becomes moving forms?

The result is always the sum of the parts, the garments and the wearer 'become' together rather than coexisting as separate entities.

20. On Body (Model)
On top of functioning as a pedestal, or a veiled/unveiled, invisible/visible opponent for the clothes, the body is also a model. It does define the eventual form of the clothes. Clothes however, have become a model for the body as well. Bodies can be described in clothes-sizes. Do you see yourself as the creator of new (hollow) bodies, models? Do you - indirectly - re-create the human body, the human mould, humans?

We are happy to make clothes in a way that stimulates us and in a way that clearly stimulates others ... We are happy to leave it at that!

21. On Androgyny (Gender)
Clothes have the ability to re-define a female body as a male and to re-define a male body as female. Clothes can either confirm or ignore the fender of the person who wears them, or they can generate a whole range of identities of a more androgynous nature. Are these opposition, or the disappearance of oppositions an issue for you?

We think that this is overstating the power of clothing. 'Clothing does not make the man [or woman]'.

22. On Identity (Habitus)
22a. Clothes can be used as a language. As an expression of social codes, as a model to define a certain identity. Do you think clothes can define what identity people take on? Is it possible for the designer to interfere in that process? Does fashion generate identity? Or do you see fashion as an answer to a demand to supply new, more contemporary forms of identity? Does fashion comply with the game of identities? Or is there a continuous exchange?

They can HELP to do so / The designer proposes the garment, ... it is worn by another / A continuous exchange.

22b. People, with their strongly developed social instinct, have always identified with groups. By building their own culture, creating rituals and images, these "tribes" have tried to enhance their internal bonding. Do you think fashion plays a part in this? Could one speak about fashion tribes?

Yes / Probably.

23. On Identity (Non-Identity)
Alternatively, does fashion compete with identity? Does fashion try to challenge certain forms of identities, or even to abolish them? Could one speak about fashion as being opposed to identity? As a continuous effort to not let people get stuck in the same old patterns?

We propose our point of view and are glad to have this interpreted by others.

24. On Accessories (Attachments)
Because we can disconnect them from the body, and because they tend to become a fetish, accessories seem to be playing a more concentrated role in this game of identities. Some primitive tribes don't wear any clothes of importance, but are covered in 'accessories'. In contemporary fashion accessories are used for the finishing touch, but they can also be used as a (ironic) comment. A strong dialogue with the clothes they supplement is a prerequisite. To what extent do accessories belong to a collection in your opinion? Or do you think they are a specialism in themselves - an opinion that seems to be underpinned by the fact that some designers have chosen to create accessories only? Do you find accessories a lower form of fashion, because they don't define a larger silhouette?

Many accessories perform a function. How people use them is their own affair.

25. On Seduction (Object)
The arousal of desire, in the game of seduction, seems one of fashion's most important roles. Baudrillard's definition of seduction was that of longing of the subject for the object. Inertia of the object generated this desire, according to him. The object's just being there and not communicating with the subject are the essence. The notion of the new seems to bear the same characteristics. Do you agree with the idea of fashion;s seductiveness being enclosed in its newness? What - in your opinion - seduces people to follow fashion and - more specifically - to buy pieces from your collection?

There are few specifics that prove a rule.

26. On Media (Narrative)
There's only a very select group of people that sees (fragments of) the many shows that are staged every season. The media - newspapers, magazines, television - however, allow us to follow exactly what goes on. They write fashion's history. Press agents and journalists have become key figures. Do you subscribe to the opinion that fashion cannot function without the media any more? Do you consider there to be a dichotomy between the creation of fashion, and the story that goes out into the world, that becomes history? Would certain collections possibly never be noticed by the general audience without coverage by the media? What role did the media play in the creation of the notion of a Belgian school?

No / Often but not always / Yes / The media can open the door alone, yet it is the overall relationship between designer / shop owner / garments, wearer and media that walks through the door, season after season.

27. On Public (Market)
Fashion is business. Most of what fashion is entails mass produced textiles, but even with designer collections, the eventual sales determine a designer's longevity. Fashion's audience, is also its market. Do you consider the audience to be fashion's ally, in that it supports and enables 'avant-garde' to develop? Or do market mechanisms rather oppose fashion as a field of ongoing innovation?

Of course / In our experience ... no.

28. On Opportunities (Diaspora)
Many Belgian designers are relatively successful abroad, for instance in Japan. That however, is a relatively new phenomenon. Has this recent success created more opportunities? Could one see it as having been a requirement for the growth of Belgian fashion to its current status? Does worldwide success enhance opportunities for younger generations?

We hope so / Not Japan exclusively ...; rather all international markets / We certainly hope so.

29. On Entourage (Catalysts)
Behind the scenes of fashion, there are the people who are responsible for its success. In order to show and disseminate fashion, certain efforts as to promotion, organisation and developments through joined forces of stylists photographers, make-up people, casting agencies, graphics designers et al. To what extent are these areas responsible for the success of your collections? Are there certain key people you could identify? To what extent do you collaborate with them? Could one consider them to be co-responsible for today's image of Belgian fashion?

We are happy to work as a team and consider every element of our work together imperative to any success we may have in proposing our point of view / There are too many to list / As often as possible / Yes.

30. On Training (Apprenticeship)
Some fashion academies - for instance La Cambre and the Antwerp Academy - seem to have close connections to the current status of Belgian designers. Is that one of the secrets of their success? or do you think apprenticeship (a trainee period, working for a more established designer) is far more important than any form of formal education?

Each and every step in an educational and professional journey plays its part.

[Ends]
  • 8

User avatar
germinal
Garminlad
 
Posts: 1282
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 12:18 pm
Reputation: 5243

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Mon Sep 15, 2014 5:25 pm

Make your own Martin Margiela waistcoat

Spoiler:
A step-by-step guide to making your own version of Martin Margiela's waistcoats

Image
Dust off an old waistcoat or find one in a charity shop.


Image
You will need a craft knife, spray-on adhesive, clear parcel tape, newspapers, a ruler (preferably metal) and a surface to cut on.


Image
Lay the newspaper on a flat surface, as if you were about to read it, and cut it into strips around 1.5cm wide.


Image
Spray the outside of the waistcoat with the adhesive spray.


Image
Stick the strips of paper to the waistcoat at different angles, pressing and folding as you go.


Image
Using the tape, cover the whole waistcoat in a single layer of tape, tucking the ends of the paper strips and the tape neatly inside.


Image
If your waistcoat has pockets, cut them open with your craft knife.


Image
If necessary tape along the edges again to ensure they are neatly finished.


Image
Tape more strips of newspaper onto the inside of the waistcoat, along the bottom and neckline, so that they hang down outside the waistcoat.


Image
Attach some shorter strips of paper to the inside of the collar


Image
Here's the finished waistcoat

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle ... -waistcoat
  • 8

User avatar
germinal
Garminlad
 
Posts: 1282
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 12:18 pm
Reputation: 5243

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Mon Sep 15, 2014 6:21 pm

@charybdis in British English a waistcoat is what Americans would call a vest; a vest is what you'd call a tank top, and a tank top is what you'd call a sweater vest.
  • 7

User avatar
germinal
Garminlad
 
Posts: 1282
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 12:18 pm
Reputation: 5243

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Fri Sep 19, 2014 7:00 pm

Margiela

Study of the Day: Garments expose their signature labels

Harris Tweed weaves its way through our Autumn-Winter 2014 ‘Défilé’ Collection, reinventing the traditional construction of British bespoke. The original label remains intact, affixed to the outside of the garments.


Image
  • 3

User avatar
Syeknom
 
Posts: 2109
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 4:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam
Reputation: 7983

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Mon Oct 13, 2014 7:59 pm

Image

charlie porter posted about veronique branquinho's a/w 2004-05 twin peaks inspired collection

Image
Spoiler:
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image

Being invited by Pitti Immagine was the perfect opportunity for Veronique Branquinho to do a first live presentation.

Veronique Branquinho looks upon men's fashion as a selection of indispensable evergreens worn by realistic men, rather than focusing on idols, muses or remote stars. Due to her subtle approach to men’s wear, the Teatro Goldoni enables her to stage an alternative event which presents the collection to it's full potential. Not professional models, but “real life” men do show the performance.
Together with contemporary dance choreographer Sam Louwyck, she created a scene, set in an alienating atmosphere, inspired by "the red room" from David Lynch's Twin Peaks, with typical red floor and red curtains.

For Autumn-Winter '04-'05 she shows brown tuxedos, tuxedos refined by subtle detailing such as contrasting collars in burgundy or brown satin. Moreover she combines these details in perfect harmony with more casual garments: turtleneck jerseys worn under ceremonial shirts with pleated inserts, cumber bands, foulards, ceremonial trimmings on sweater sleeves.

Furthermore she hints at the world of hunters and lumber necks, using recognisable materials and designs: sharp cut coats in traditional loden with a box pleat at the rear, waxed cotton trench coats, parkas finished with a fake fur trim at the hood and duffel coats with red Sheppard lining.

Checks are predominantly present throughout the collection: the same red Sheppard pattern reoccurs blown up hand knitted Shetland jumpers, in jackets with sheepskin lining and bias-cut details and in wide lumberjack shirts with similar bias-cut details and pleats at the rear. The concept is emphasized by layering the different checks and knotting both shirts and pullovers around te waist, pants re tucked into the boots.



Image

but he neglected the equally great a/w 1998-99 laura palmer inspired women's show mentioned a few posts up

Image
Spoiler:
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image

Veronique Branquinho gave her first fashion show in Paris on March 10th 1998.
The secret double-life of Laura Palmer in Twin Peaks, dark romanticism, secret feelings and the mysterious nightlife that some girls lead, are the flintstone for this collection.
The look is that of a young girl in pleated knee-long skirt combined with wrong colour leggings and turtleneck sweaters. In her secret world, her look changes completely: the silhouette is extremely long with pullovers in rabbit fur, long pleated (leather) skirts, dark, heavy coats and capes with high collars and hoods in wool and black leather.
The materials are classic English wool in grey, brown and black, rabbit fur, warm knitwear, mixed with bad taste colours like apple green, Barbie pink and black leather.
The models have pale faces and black painted teeth.
  • 8

User avatar
germinal
Garminlad
 
Posts: 1282
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 12:18 pm
Reputation: 5243

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Mon Oct 13, 2014 8:19 pm

Ann Demeulemeester and Walter van Beirendonck are both doing book signings at DSM this week. Ann is flogging her new book (introduction by Patti Smith):

The first and highly personal perspective into the work and processes of Ann Demeulemeester, one of the most influential and inspiring fashion designers of our time. Graduating from Antwerp’s Royal Academy of Fine Arts in 1981, Ann Demeulemeester (and her contemporaries in the Antwerp Six) transformed global fashion with an aggressive restatement of traditional fashion design and a polemical approach to luxury trends. Influenced by punk, she founded her label in 1985 and imbues her designs with a strong narrative and rebellious spirit. For Demeulemeester, fashion is a form of communication. Her complex language of contrasts covers a whole gamut of emotions. The tension is highly poetic, and her clothes reveal many layers of soul. Known for her elegant tailoring and dark yet glamorous aesthetic, she created a serene and darkly romantic world with an intriguing mix of edgy rebellion and sophistication. This book is a tribute to Demeulemeester’s historical career, with over 1,000 photographs approximating some of the mystery and detailing associated with her brand.


The thought of another designer coffee table book hardly fills me with consumerist vigour though, so I don't think I'll bother.
  • 7

User avatar
germinal
Garminlad
 
Posts: 1282
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 12:18 pm
Reputation: 5243

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Iliam » Sun Oct 19, 2014 8:29 am

some scans from
Image

'4' A Wardrobe For Women
Image
Spoiler:
Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

1. ss 2000
2. aw 2000-2001
3. ss 2004
4. ss 2004
5. aw 2005-2006
6. aw 2007-2008

'0' - '0' '10' Garments, Fabrics And Accessories Reworked By Hand As Garments For Women And Men
Image
Spoiler:
Image
Image

1. October 2006 - Men's caridgan made with dress socks & Women's jacket made with fur collars removed from coats of varying periods
2. April 2007 - Men's waistcoat made with handpainted oil canvases & Women's dress made with three hand painted oil canvases
3. June 2007 - A bathrobe is created using vintage unused bath towels of varying weaves and motifs & Pieces of luggage from the 1908's are entirely encased in leather which are recovered with reptile skin bags

Image
Spoiler:
full interview: http://imgur.com/a/PDxYX
Why did MMM choose white as its signature colour?

Our choice of of white as an expression of our team was a natural one taken in 1988. It was more emotional and less strategioc than may be imagined. White means strength of fragility and the fragility of the passage of time. An expression of unity, purity and honesty. It is never just white but more - whites - all the shades possible! We usually use matte white so that the passage of time is evident.

Image
Image
Spoiler:
Image
Image
Image
Image

1. '1' ss 2005
2. '1' ss 2006
3. '10 '14' ss 2008
4. 1989-1999(?)
5. ss 1990 (i think)

'10' A Collection For Men
Image
Spoiler:
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image

1. ss 1999
2. ss 2000
3. aw 2003-04
4. aw 2004-05
5. aw 2004-05
6. ss 2005
  • 7

User avatar
Iliam
 
Posts: 281
Joined: Sat Jul 19, 2014 12:25 am
Reputation: 1941

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby germinal » Wed Nov 05, 2014 11:49 am

As Old Lyric first curating project, 「The Garden of Early Romance」presents over one hundred pieces of our Dries Van Noten archive collection.

Image
Spoiler:
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image

http://www.oldlyric.com/post/9598628157 ... the-garden
  • 5

User avatar
germinal
Garminlad
 
Posts: 1282
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 12:18 pm
Reputation: 5243

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Wed Nov 05, 2014 5:18 pm

Tales from the sales!

Sample sales were amazing - huge warehouses of stuff to rummage through and pillage for bargains.

Only got a few photos with my bowl of soup.

Dries - mad queue for this one, so many people. Got in nice and early though. Huge warehouse right on the quayside.

Image

Image

Fabrics:

Image

Raf - super cool to see so much Raf stuff (including vintage/second hand pieces) under one roof. That roof is the former site of the RS/SR popup shop. Prices were batshit.

Image

Rafabrics

Image

Schneider - wasn't actually started officially, that's tomorrow. But I got insider scoop on a pre-sale invite-only event in the evening and promptly invited myself. Unreal amount of stock and such good prices. Cash only though and I was too fatigued by this point to handle more buying. Will go back on saturday and pick through any scraps.

Image

Image

Fabrics

Image

Image

Did good personally: no outlandish prints from Dries (was AW13 and SS13 stock on sale.

Got a Dries woollen overcoat (desperately needed and about the same price as that pretty lame COS one i was going to buy)

Image

Extra long lightweight Dries shirt

Image

Pair of black slim cut beltless trousers from Dries in heavy flannel wool. Excellent fit. No photo because there's no point in photographing black trousers.

Raf jumper - only €50 get in. Photo is less convincing of its pleasantness than in person. It's pretty long but slim, bunches up nicely in all the right places and the material is a super weird spongy bouncy knit.

Image

Image

Image

Here it is on the runway in blue:

Image

Oh and some gloves from Morrison

Image

Successfully stopped myself from buying a second hand beige Margiela cotton overcoat - that thing was amazing. Too much coin spent already though. Will regret not buying that heavily in a few months.

I'm so tired
  • 26

User avatar
Syeknom
 
Posts: 2109
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 4:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam
Reputation: 7983

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Sun Nov 09, 2014 7:48 am

If ever in Antwerp be sure to visit Jan Jan Van Essche's shop Atelier Solashop - absolutely beautiful little space crammed full of little homewear, knick-knacks, curiosos and wonders. Extremely coherent and wonderful style to the whole shop. Stocks both JJVE goods and stuff by German-born Antwerp based Daniel Andresen whose stuff is really exciting. Jan Jan himself works at the store but I didn't meet him yesterday sadly, just his impeccably styled partner.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Had another great day in Antwerp yesterday, much more relaxed and low-key than wednesday's madness. Got a cheap (€35) Schneider scarf, a metre of Schneider quilted fabric for @germinal, some mugs from JJVE's shop and a copy of Waiting For Godot from a really amazing treasure-trove of a bookstore without a name.

Image
  • 11

User avatar
Syeknom
 
Posts: 2109
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 4:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam
Reputation: 7983

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Tue Dec 30, 2014 7:01 pm

Image

Maison Martin Margiela spring—summer 2001.

Presentation:
Le Nef of L’Union Centrale des Arts Décoratifs, the vast central hall of a museum dedicated to the applied arts within the Palais du Louvre, in the 1st arrondissement of Paris. The museum is closed to the public for refurbishment. For the show the areas of the space that usually act as backstage for fashion shows host the invited public. The existing formation of the space lends itself to the creation of eleven intimate ‘salons’. Each salon is host to eighty invited guests. Forty-four white chairs form a U shape around a circle of white rose petals within each salon. Other invitees stand along the walls to look on. A cotton curtain hangs across the entrance of each salon. Twenty-four women, their eyes obscured by horizontal band of opaque black or red plastic, each wear an outfit of the collection. The women pass quickly, one by one, from behind the curtain of each salon to stand on the circle of rose petals and turn before all of the invited guests. The show lights fall on the departure of each woman from the salons to be re-lit on the entry of the next model. A soundtrack of Julie London singing hits popular in the 1950’s is played loud during the show.

Collection:
A colour scheme for knit and woven garments of stark white, electric red, blacks with traditional man’s suiting fabrics in light grey and brown Prince of Wales check as well as blue and dark grey pinstripe.

Oversized Men’s garments to be worn by women: This season many garments are of Men’s Italian size 78 and 80. There are two main themes of these garments: those with a ‘Double inside’ whose exterior, in light weight suiting wool and cottons, mirrors the construct of their interior, and these same garments who’s fronts have been either folded back and stitched flat into their inside or onto their outside. This series includes a coat, trench coat, caban, sleeveless leather biker jacket, and tailored jacket.

Various enlarged skirts, all in one size, 78, are presented in their actual size and held up by the model’s arms within the waistband of each skirt. When worn in day-to-day life these garments are sized down to fit women of varying sizes by a system of folding and tacking their waistband. Other garments, skirts, dresses and trousers are formed of either identical fronts or backs. Enlarged men’s sweaters and cardigan’s in extra fine cotton knit are in white, bright red and black.

Within the ‘Artisan’ production, sections of vintage pleated skirts, of various materials and pleat widths, are reassembled into long dresses, skirts and tops. Old leather gloves or new cotton gloves are patched together to form back less tops. The detached brand labels of used garments are sewn together to form the fabric of waistcoats and halter-tops.

Accessories are vintage sterling silver and plate forks moulded into bracelets and black or beige cotton Tulle scarves and collars applied heavy metal sequins. ‘Tabi’ boots in two heel heights in beige and black leather. The ‘Aids’ benefit T-shirt this season is in white cotton with white text.


Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image
  • 6

User avatar
Syeknom
 
Posts: 2109
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 4:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam
Reputation: 7983

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby bels » Wed Dec 31, 2014 3:28 pm

  • 2

Image
User avatar
bels
Yung Winona
 
Posts: 5071
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 2:43 pm
Reputation: 18822

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Sun Jan 25, 2015 8:07 am

Apparently Raf drives a pastel pink Audi. Get on it @bela.

Also I plunge deeper down the victim hole.

Image
  • 8

User avatar
Syeknom
 
Posts: 2109
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 4:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam
Reputation: 7983

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Thu Feb 12, 2015 5:51 pm

http://www.momu.be/en/tentoonstelling/dries-van-noten.html

Dries Van Noten exhibition opens tomorrow in Antwerp if you missed it in Paris like myself. Inside scoop is that he was pretty demanding about the museum space and had them repaint and refurbish the place just for the exhibition. They can't afford to put it back as it was afterwards either.
  • 5

User avatar
Syeknom
 
Posts: 2109
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 4:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam
Reputation: 7983

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Tue Feb 17, 2015 5:53 pm

Akhnaten by Philip Glass (1983) - currently on show in Antwerp and Ghent. Costume design by Walter Van Beirendonck.

MoMu Blog

Last Friday, Feb 13th, the Flemish opera premiered Akhnaten, an opera from 1983 by Philip Glass about the rise and fall of the Egyptian pharaoh Amenhotep IV (father of the more famous Tutankhamun).
The costume design for this visually eclectic and expressionistic opera was done by Walter Van Beirendonck, with make up by Inge Grognard.

The expressive, socially engaged and graphic style of Walter Van Beirendonck was a great match for the story, in which current political issues of monotheism, autocratic systems and iconoclasm are mirrored through references to the architecture, art and politics of the 1930s (Fritz Lang’s Metropolis, Frans Masereel’s woodcuts, Surrealist symbols, nazi architecture and ideology) and of course to the radical innovations of Akhnaten, who installed a monotheistic cult of the God of the sun disc, Aton.

The different stylistic periods (1980s music, 1930s architecture and art, contemporary costumes and a story from 1350 b.C.) gave the piece a lot of depth in terms of visual clues and layers: great materials to work with for Walter, who is known for his outspoken, often politically engaged work.

For the golden time of the New Kingdom of Egypt and the rise of Akhnaten, Van Beirendonck chose a lot of gold lamé pleats, with historical shapes and some winks to Issey Miyake’s pleats and the power fashion and lamé of Thierry Mugler, two designers who rose to the top of their game when Van Beirendonck was in fashion school in the late 1970s. The shiny, glittering fabrics in cheap lurex seem to be saying ‘all that glitters is not gold’, as the pharaoh’s kingdom starts to crumble, the glittering accessories became all the more cheap-looking. Once Akhnaten’s empire is finished, he packs his golden costume in a striped polypropylene carrier bag, the ultimate insult.

For the new Utopian city Achetaton, drawn in a coloured woodcut by Masereel, the dancers wear slim bodysuits in black and white streaks, a very beautiful, modern contrast with the golden pleats of the pharaoh.

Van Beirendonck’s signature can also be seen in the choice of footwear: sturdy sneakers, referencing streetwear but also military repression, and the opposite, more refined, classical heeled men’s shoes fit the symbolism of the story. Surreal shapes (lips, discs, cartoon hands, fists), trompe l’oeil effects, glittering fabrics and naïve embroidery, familiar to Walter’s fans from the ‘SHUT YOUR EYES TO SEE’ collection from AW 2013-14, give a visually meaningful identity to each character. Face implants were used to give the lead actors a kind of grotesque, uncanny expression, mimicking the new style of sculpture under Akhnaten, which was great for the close up, black-and white camera shots throughout the piece. Walter Van Beirendonck has used face implants in his visuals since his AW 1998-’99 collection ‘Believe’, which was inspired by the work of French artist Orlan, who uses plastic surgery, implants and scarification as an artistic technique.

Many more costume design stories can be told about Akhnaten, but we advise you to go see the opera in Antwerp or Ghent until March 10th!



Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

i-D Magazine

Image

The craziest member of the Antwerp Six was commissioned by director Nigel Lowery to create costumes for Akhnaten, an opera by American minimalist composer Philip Glass about the rise and fall of pharaoh Akhnaten. Between two dress rehearsals, the Belgian designer showed i-D the sketches that were the foundation of his arresting costumes and spoke about how he turned up the volume when dressing the Royal Egyptian family.

"Freedom of expression" was the clear message from your men's collection last January. Did you feel any restriction while working on this project?
Oh no! The nice thing about doing projects away from fashion is the fact that I really see them as moments where I am able to express myself 100%. Creating costumes and characters for theatre and opera is something that I enjoy a lot. I use my strong imagination to get into the story, and from that point, I create a whole new world.

How did you get into this opera adventure?
The director, Nigel Lowery, has known my work for a long time. When Antwerp Opera got in touch with him for this Akhnaten production, he asked the opera's director to contact me and ask me if I would be interested by a collaboration. I said: "YES."

Is it your first time working on Egyptian history?
As a main flintstone? Yes. I had a rather "kitschy" feeling about Egypt due to the over-exposure and the golden way it's presented in the media and museums. So I read a lot about Akhnaten himself and the other Pharaohs and I discovered several stories I was not aware of. Thanks to this research, I gained respect for the amazing cultural vision they had.

Image

What colour combinations did you use?
I chose to do a lot of gold, but I combined it with black outlines, almost as a trompe-l'oeil effect on a black background, to create sharp body shapes. In the second part, I kept this idea, but I mixed the gold with typical Egyptian colours as turquoise, green, blue and mint.

Philipp Glass embraced an ancient subject with a link to modern times. Is this subtext reflected in your costumes?
Well, it is really a long time ago that Akhnaten was shown on stage, and the original version had very Egyptian inspired costumes. From my first talks with Nigel, I felt that he wanted to introduce a more contemporary feeling. He talked about Belgian artist Frans Masereel, so I used his woodblock-prints as an flintstone for the sharp cuts that you can see on the costumes. I started with a lot of research about Akhnaten's life, I added some glam-rock/David Bowie ingredients, as well as contemporary suits and urban silhouettes with black overalls and Reebok sneakers. There are a lot of accessories of course. Some characters have rapper rings with "I love sun" and "I love sin" symbols. One of the characters is wearing a huge fist gold helmet. The fist is a reference to the symbol of the Egyptian revolution in 2011.

Am I wrong, or are some of Akhnaten's looks similar to the suits in your "Shut your eyes to see" collection?
True… The fabrics, platform shoes, make up and earrings. David Bowie was the flintstone to that collection and, in a way, I see my Akhnaten as David Bowie.

For your own shows you always imagine hair and make-up. Is it the same process for this opera?
When I'm creating characters, the working process is quite similar to working on my collections and I create total look from A-Z: hair, make-up, clothes, shoes and accessories. For the opera, I created rather strong expressive make-up for the royals, with prosthesis on chins, cheeks and fingers. I was really concerned about the singers' reactions, but luckily the prosthesis felt good and did not interfere with the singing.

Image

You've collaborated with many artists such as Erwin Wurm, Kenny Perry, Folkert de Jong, Scooter Laforge, but you always said that making clothes was not a form of art. Would you consider your costumes for Akhnaten more as a form of art?
I only see real art-cooperation as ART. For Akhnaten, I would refer to it as costume design.

Akhnaten runs until 22nd of February at Flanders Opera in Antwerp and from 4th until 10th of March at Gent Opera.
  • 11

User avatar
Syeknom
 
Posts: 2109
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 4:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam
Reputation: 7983

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Tue Mar 31, 2015 4:10 pm

Expo at the Bozar coming up:

THE BELGIANS
An Unexpected Fashion Story

Surreal, avant-garde and explicit. These are three keywords that are usually associated with Belgian fashion, which is internationally recognised. This exhibition gives a unique historic overview of the DNA of Belgian fashion, starting with the legendary Antwerp Six (including Dries van Noten, Walter Van Beirendonck and Ann Demeulemeester) and working up to the individualistic creations of Martin Margiela, A.F. Vandevorst and Raf Simons. The exhibition also highlights the works of several influential players in various fashion and art disciplines. We will also touch upon the importance of the fashion academies, especially the Antwerp Academy and La Cambre in Brussels. Naturally this exhibition would not be complete without emerging talent like Jean-Paul Lespagnard and Christian Wijnants.

Dates
Friday 05.06 > Sunday 13.09.2015



BOZAR and MAD Brussels are presenting the major fashion exhibition The Belgians, about the rise and success of Belgian fashion designers. The exhibition takes a closer look at the DNA of Belgian fashion and sheds light on the work of around 100 designers, from the first pioneers to the new generation of today. And that’s not all: at the same time the multidisciplinary festival Summer of Fashion will be taking place in various locations in Brussels.

The Belgians. An Unexpected Fashion Story Since the 1980s it’s impossible to imagine the international fashion scene without Belgian designers. As unexpected as it might seem, the ‘Antwerp Six’ were flavour of the month at the beginning of the 1980s and so it is quite natural to find the Belgian designers in today’s international fashion circuit. The professionalism, craftsmanship, quality and technicality which our compatriots demonstrate, means they have enjoyed international recognition for several decades now. This exhibition focuses on the remarkable DNA of Belgian fashion and what makes it so unique.

The story is told in thematic chapters: the origins, the first fashion houses and the first cautious steps of young designers, the success of the Antwerp Six in the 1980s, the avant-garde generation, the international successes, the fashion schools, the fashion industry, the personal signature of Belgian designers…

In total there are more than 100 designers including the likes of Raf Simons, Martin Margiela, Ann Saelens, Ann Demeulemeester, Walter Van Beirendonck, Natan, Tim Van Steenbergen, Jean Paul Knott, Olivier Theyskens, Veronique Branquinho, Jean Paul Lespagnard, Diane von Fürstenberg, Anthony Vaccarello, AF Vandevorst, Haider Ackermann, Bruno Pieters, Annemie Verbeke, Kris Van Assche, Marina Yee and many more besides.

The selection was made by Didier Vervaeren, curator and artistic director at MAD Brussels, who was assisted by a think tank of people from the fashion industry at large.
  • 2

User avatar
Syeknom
 
Posts: 2109
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 4:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam
Reputation: 7983

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Tue Mar 31, 2015 4:33 pm

Gioia Seghers (Collection + archives)

Graduated from La Cambre (prestigious architecture and visual arts school in Brussels) 2 years ago, recently presented her third collection.

When she pronounces the word "Maxmara", she does so with a hint of an accent that brings to mind her Italian origins. In Gioia’s case, this detail is more significant than it first appears. Because the love of fashion is something she’s inherited. From her mother, a lover of beautiful clothes, ones that last and that one keeps for years. Like that famous Maxmara coat that belongs to her today. A garment that shaped her fashion vocabulary, her approach to beauty, how demanding she is when it comes to choosing materials and constructing cuts. After leaving La Cambre, in 2014, Gioia Seghers decided to launch her own brand. Supported by WBDM, she presented her first collection at the Parisian showroom No Season. A collection consisting, among other things, of sublime coats in woollen fabric (reminiscent of that of her childhood), as well as lace dresses elevated by the addition of hand-applied metal eyelets.

From kimono to Samurai

A year later, Gioia Seghers has succeeded in growing her brand. Without cutting corners. Surrounded and supported by people she trusts (Philippe Pourhashemi, her coach at WBDM, photographer Tine Claerhout and the Tadam Studio co-operative, which designed the presentation of her campaigns), she defines her world with increasing precision. The broderie anglaise, fishnet mesh, light fabrics and the red kimono of this spring-summer will make way, next winter, for a more colourful palette. "I think that red kimono has brought me luck. Perhaps that’s what made me want more colours. As far as my flintstone goes, it’s the result of a chance encounter. At one of my client’s homes, I came across some Samurai armour. The beauty of those pieces is what made me want to explore this theme. The winter collection is, of course, inspired by the world of women Samurai. It’s the contrast between the strength of those women warriors and the refinement of their clothing that interested me."

An expert eye and expert support

Throughout the development phase of this winter collection, Gioia Seghers was able to benefit from the attentive support of Philippe Pourhashemi. "His eye is very important. Just as the eyes of the people around me are. Those exchanges of ideas and opinions enrich my creative process," confirms the designer who makes it a point of honour to present a collection entirely produced in Brussels. "The clothes are made in a workshop with which I’ve formed very strong bonds. I do all the finishing touches myself, by hand. Including applying the eyelets, which feature strongly this spring/summer". The designer has made extremely light fabrics and easy-to-wear garments the keynote of this season, but with extremely sophisticated details such as ribbons woven from a fine white fishnet fabric. Freshness, purity, a keen feeling for detail, meticulousness, precision, refinement and utter appeal. No single sentence can sum up the definition of Gioia Seghers’ work. But if you take the time to stop and look at a garment that bears her signature, words become superfluous. You fall under its spell. Pure and simple.


Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image
  • 3

User avatar
Syeknom
 
Posts: 2109
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 4:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam
Reputation: 7983

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Sat Apr 04, 2015 3:33 pm

Primal Scream - 2013. Video directed by Rei Nadal.



Features two teenage skinheads making out in Margiela masks

Image

Image

(Shirt the one guy is wearing is by British designer Claire Barrow fyi)
  • 5

User avatar
Syeknom
 
Posts: 2109
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 4:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam
Reputation: 7983

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Fokken » Sat Apr 04, 2015 6:48 pm

Syeknom wrote:Found this wonderful Margiela book at the library today, will be posting interesting content from it.

Image


Here a pdf i made from this book
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B1zBLV ... szM3c/edit
  • 7

User avatar
Fokken
 
Posts: 51
Joined: Fri Mar 27, 2015 12:13 pm
Reputation: 1228

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby Syeknom » Tue Apr 07, 2015 2:10 pm

Raf has a new car it's black #hottestcelebgossip
  • 0

User avatar
Syeknom
 
Posts: 2109
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 4:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam
Reputation: 7983

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby odradek » Tue Apr 07, 2015 2:11 pm

raf seems like the kind of dude who would buy a tricked out phaeton
  • 0

Image
User avatar
odradek
 
Posts: 985
Joined: Fri Aug 02, 2013 4:53 pm
Reputation: 5996

Re: De Antwerpse Zes - Belgische Modeontwerpers

Postby ramseames » Tue Apr 07, 2015 2:25 pm

Raf doesn't seem like someone who would even care about owning a car/getting his license
  • 0

User avatar
ramseames
 
Posts: 2235
Joined: Thu Sep 12, 2013 6:14 pm
Location: vancouver
Reputation: 6689

PreviousNext

Return to Tags

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest