Unexpressionism: Tigran Avetisyan

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Unexpressionism: Tigran Avetisyan

Postby germinal » Mon Jul 07, 2014 6:07 pm

[vimeo]http://www.vimeo.com/77489476[/vimeo]
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Re: Unexpressionism: Tigran Avetisyan

Postby germinal » Mon Jul 07, 2014 6:07 pm

Tigran Avetisyan is a Russian designer who graduated from the CSM BA course in 2012.

http://www.tigran.co.uk

His distinctive technique involves applying colour to flat, finished garments; initially with paint and chalk, more recently with a printer.

The process:

Spoiler:
[vimeo]http://www.vimeo.com/75711429[/vimeo]
[vimeo]http://www.vimeo.com/75542447[/vimeo]


Graduation collection:

http://tigran.co.uk/assets/tigran-aveti ... ction-.pdf

[vimeo]http://www.vimeo.com/44727824[/vimeo]

Spoiler:
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Spring Summer 2014:

(i would rip more pictures but the lookbooks are pretty comprehensive)

http://tigran.co.uk/assets/tigran-aveti ... r-2014.pdf

[vimeo]http://www.vimeo.com/77489476[/vimeo]

Autumn Winter 2014:

http://tigran.co.uk/assets/tigran-aveti ... r-2014.pdf

[vimeo]http://www.vimeo.com/84255629[/vimeo]

Spring Summer 2015:

Spoiler:
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Re: Unexpressionism: Tigran Avetisyan

Postby germinal » Mon Jul 07, 2014 6:07 pm

http://1granary.com/central-saint-marti ... avetisyan/
Tell us about your background and how did you get into Central Saint Martins?
I came to London from Saint Petersburg when I was 18 to study product design at Saint Martins. As much as I loved the discipline I realised that I wasn’t happy with the way the course was structured. There was scarcely any work and the atmosphere was dreadful. Many of us felt second-class because nobody would give a damn about non-fashion pathways. At the end of the first year I was lucky enough to bump into Christopher New (menswear course director) who saw my work and took me on his course.
Spoiler:
What did your parents think about this decision?
Initially they didn’t approve of it mostly because it meant they would have to support me financially for a bit longer than they had initially planned. Now it is all over I hope they are relieved.

Describe these past few years at CSM?
Has it actually been years? It all flew by so quickly.

How was your placement year and what is the most valuable thing you learnt?
The year out was an amazing experience. Obviously each story is personal since it depends on the company one ends up in and the people he/she works with. But I think generally speaking it puts everything into perspective. You get a better idea of scale and value of your work at the end of it.

What did you think about the newly built Kings Cross site on your return?
In the beginning I was guttered to say the least. I think everybody agrees the ID cards made everyday life a struggle. As far as I can remember we were promised to roam freely between pathways. In reality we had less access to studios than ever. It felt like being a broiler inside a massive farm… Nonetheless as time went on it was fun to see what people are coming up with to outwit the system. For instance putting chairs in between doors to prevent them from locking, borrowing ID cards from classmates to get friends into the building, etc.. To me that’s when true creativity begins!

Please tell us about your final collection.
My starting point was the idea of repetition and tautology in particular. The bulk of the research was done in the university about the university. My wonderful classmates were the biggest flintstone. For example the chalked on messages are actually fragments of conversations I had heard whilst sewing the collection. Another major influence were the rebellious schoolboys from Jean Vigo’s 1933 classic ‘Zéro de conduite’. Otherwise there wasn’t that much research in a common sense of the word – most of the collection was improvised or designed by people around me.

How would you describe your style then?
I don’t think there is a visual point that I would always push from. I suppose I am still mapping out the territory. To me fashion is cheating and designers are liars. The game is to see how far you can take it without being caught.

We know you had won a bursary from the LVMH group.
Yes I did. And it was one of the most fantastic things that happened to me this year. Apart from money I have gained their moral support which to me was even more valuable.

When you look back at yourself in the first year, what would you advice to yourself now?
Learn to work while you rest and more importantly rest while you work.

What about the soon to be final years, any advice for them?
Don’t grow up – it’s a trap.

What is the best thing about the CSM experience?
To paraphrase Diane Vreeland’s quote: The best thing about CSM is LCF. I am sorry but we are even better than them at procrastination…

And finally what is for the future?
I do not like planning far ahead. I just made a limited amount of copies of the t-shirt from the second look to be sold on my webpage http://www.tigran.co.uk. I’ll see what the response is like and then decide what to do next.



http://1granary.com/central-saint-marti ... saying-no/
Tigran Avetisyan: Finding Your Own Way of Saying “No”
Sep 18, 2013
CSM students and graduates are probably most well-known for their rebellious attitude towards fashion, or simply everything in life. After producing one of the most memorable graduation collections of 2012, Menswear graduate Tigran Avetisyan has moved a step forward by launching his second collection. “Nothing Changes”, one of the slogans on the garments, makes me wonder whether this is a reflection towards society, or if it’s more about Tigran himself? In this new collection, we see some interesting duplications of ideas and concept from his previous, and we just had to have a little chat with Tigran, for the second time, to learn more about this continuation of rebellion and self-expression.

How has life been since graduating?
I took a long break after graduation. Having spent 6 years in higher education, first as a product design student and then menswear, I knew I had to stop studying. I really needed a change to reflect on everything that has happened and to map out my next steps. Although my graduation collection was picked up by the press internationally, I was absolutely clueless as to where I could take things further, and who to go to. Fortunately I received an email from Machine-A saying that they would love to have my designs in their store. This is how I ended up where I am now.
Being labelled as a rebellious designer by journalists led me to think about the idea of rebellion in fashion. As the pace of the industry is increasing, and there are more and more collections each year, I realised that the only way to protest against this endless stream of creativity was to repeat myself. Hence there is nothing new about my new collection. That’s my way of saying ‘NO’.

Spoiler:
How did you come up with the messages/words on the garments?
I remember being on the verge of crying on the day of the show at CSM. It was one hour before the catwalk and I still hadn’t had anything scribbled on my garments. At that point I had lost the very little confidence I had; I was terrified. I realised I had nothing to say whatsoever. Finally, after much hesitation, I picked up the chalk and wrote: “Graduate 2012 – Nothing more to say”. The models actually walked out with paint still being wet. I absolutely hated myself then for leaving it all till last minute, but now I think that was one of the coolest things I have ever done.

Do you consider your work as being political?
It is to a certain degree, but I don’t like defining my work. I try to make it open-ended. I am more interested in hearing what others think about it. Having said that, there is one thing I surely wouldn’t want it to be; I am often asked if I consider it to be art. Nothing is more despicable and redundant than what is regarded to be art today.

As a working designer, do you feel the pressure to be more practical with your designs?
Figuratively speaking, to keep the ball rolling, I only need to find the few dozen people around the world to sell my clothes to – it is not that hard. I interned for two big houses in my first and second years at CSM. They were Fred Perry and Dunhill. Going there I thought I’d learn everything I needed to about menswear. To my dismay when I arrived, those companies didn’t even have sewing machines. Designers were so isolated from the products they were making, and the work was really calculated. At Fred Perry for instance, the design process consisted of changing colours on the collars of their much coveted polo shirts and placing their laurel logo on second hand Ralph Lauren jackets. I was disappointed to say the least. Of course I have ambitions, but I am not in a hurry. I am not ready to give up my freedom just yet.

Do you think that CSM students are less prepared for the real business-oriented fashion world out there than students from some other fashion schools?
The students of Saint Martins have one thing that many other graduates don’t – that is ideas. Having ideas is the ability that counts the most in any creative practice; it is the thing that turns people on. The Fashion industry is full of wonderful kind-hearted people. If you have a vision there’ll surely be someone willing to help you to take your first steps. I was incredibly lucky to be supported from very early on by the LVMH group and subsequently by Stavros Karelis and Maria Ter-Markaryan. My latest collection wouldn’t have been materialised without their support.

What has London given you as a fashion designer, and how would you compare London with other fashion capitals?
London is an incredibly exciting place for young designers. There is a slightly disrespectful, yet healthy attitude towards tradition that is necessary for new ideas and concepts to emerge. I am in love with Paris too. I find the mixture of melancholia and romance there so inspiring. Yet what is more important is to keep in mind that the world is not just London, Paris, Milan and New York – it is so much bigger! When you’re constantly working it is easy to forget that.

Apart from fashion, are you planning to do anything else?
I am interested in so many things, I would get bored too quickly doing just fashion. I caught myself thinking the other day that I love the sensation of anything on the verge of becoming something else. I think the best work is always on the threshold of being and not being.

What can we expect to see from you in the future?
I am working on the next collection now and preparing for a small video presentation at Fashion Scout Kiev this October. What I am really curious about now is how the relocation of my studio to Moscow might affect the way I work.

Do you have any advice for fashion students?
Yes, I do… David Koma told me this: when it comes to your final collection, make sure it can be described with no more than two words. Be concise. Be bold.



http://www.dazeddigital.com/fashion/art ... -avetisyan
It takes a lot to make the fashion world sit up and take notice. Russian menswear designer Tigran Avetisyan has managed to do just that, releasing his graduate collection under the sponsorship of LVMH to critical acclaim. Now based in Moscow after graduating from CSM, Avetisyan’s designs draw on the hardship of student life: the penury and the lack of hope for the future. Workman style jackets are cut from fabrics usually hidden or thrown away, like toile and calico, and disparaging slogans such as ‘No Jobs’ and ‘Nothing Changes’ are scrawled across the garments in chalk. Avetisyan’s SS14 collection is a spin-off from his debut show, the issues he drew upon for flintstone, still as relevant as ever.

Dazed Digital: Where do the slogans you use in your designs come from?

Tigran Avetisyan: The messages that I "chalk” onto garments come from various places. I have a story about each one. Most of them were overheard from my friends and classmates – ‘No jobs, too much pressure’, others come from music I listen to ‘wish you weren't here’ is a slightly reworded title of Pink Floyd's album and often it's just cliché phrases ‘stop dreaming, nothing changes’ that many people have heard or can resonate with – sometimes a word could weight more than the heaviest book.

Spoiler:
DD: You studied at CSM – how did living in London influence your work?

Tigran Avetisyan: Nowhere else in the world you are exposed to such incredible amount of creativity. The city is a melting pot of ideas, a place where so many cultures meet. Studying with people from all over the world had an immense impact on my own vision.

DD: Your graduate collection was sponsored by LVMH, how did that come about?

Tigran Avetisyan: My tutor at CSM had contacted me just few months before I was due to commence my final year. At that time I was interning for Acne in Sweden. He selected me to represent menswear pathway and compete for the bursary amongst students from other pathways. I ended up having a tête-à-tête interview with the HR manager of LVMH and Imran of Business of Fashion. A week later they told me I had been granted the scholarship.

Although the money I had won covered my tuition fees and production of graduation collection, the most important thing that I gained was confidence that I lacked then. Being supported by the world’s biggest luxury group removed the fear that otherwise most certainly would’ve prevented me from exploring my ideas to the fullest.

DD: Why did you choose Moscow as your studio base?

Tigran Avetisyan: I enjoyed my 5 year stay in the UK immensely. However as with most things, in order to get you also have to give something back. I was drained. London is fit for ambitious people, my ambitions have very little to do with my career.

DD: You describe ‘stagnancy as the new form of protest’, can you elaborate?

Tigran Avetisyan: There is a wonderful film by Ingmar Bergman called ‘Persona’ where the character played by Liv Ullmann in the face of horror and lies she experiences on day-to-day basis decides to refrain from speaking. In the age when you’re just a tweet away from sharing your point of view with millions of people the importance of self-reflection should not be undermined. Perhaps now is the time to be mute and rethink our views.

DD: What drew you to exploring rebellion within fashion?

Tigran Avetisyan: I wasn’t always interested in fashion. I arrived to London thinking I’d pursue product design studies. And I did just that for two years. However I grew weary with the course realising that no one was really interested in my work or work of my peers. Fashion on the other hand seems to attract people by default, which makes it a perfect platform for expressing one’s views. Besides, so many things are intuitively wrong about it. The industry that prides itself with being always on trend and time defining hasn’t changed for decades. It just becomes faster and faster. But then the speed is of no importance if the chosen direction is wrong.

DD: You define your personal style as ‘unexpressionism’ – defined by the people and events around you – how has your work been influenced by the current political situation in Russia?

Tigran Avetisyan: Unfortunately there is no shortage of issues I could talk about within fashion. Political hypocrisy in Russia has not been on my radar as of yet. But I never say never. Maybe my upcoming collection will touch just upon that.

DD: What’s the current feeling on the ground surrounding the recent anti-gay laws?

Tigran Avetisyan: I detest any form of violence based on race, religious beliefs or sexual preference. Regrettably the gay community in Russia historically has always been deprived of declaring their sexual preference publicly. Nevertheless I think that the scandal is completely blown out of proportion. My numerous gay friends, who don’t follow the Western media, were not even aware of the hysteria surrounding the issue until recently. It’s not like suddenly the heterosexual majority was granted a licence to kill anyone who isn’t straight. Yes, violence does occur occasionally and it is horrendous. But the fact is the conditions haven’t changed at all here. What I despise almost as much now is the situation where athlete’s achievements are overshadowed by the colour of their nail polish or when recently they were trying to boycott Stolichnaya when in fact it is not even a Russian brand. I am sick of Facebook slacktivism that consists solely of sharing links, signing petitions, and changing profile pictures to rainbow flags. If people want to rebel they should give up the comfort of their rooms. Rebellion without sacrifice is not possible.

DD: How do you think the legislation will affect the fashion scene in Russia?

Tigran Avetisyan: I hope that gay community in Russia will feel safe in the nearest future. I believe it is a question of time, as it was in Britain. Putting pressure on Russian politicians just escalates the tension between governments. I am worried that this will create further problems. They will be forced to toughen up their stance just like in the case of Pussy Riot recently after so much attention was brought by Western celebrities such as Madonna and Sir Paul McCartney. Talking about musicians, I read an interesting interview of John Lydon of Sex Pistols the other week where he calls artists such as Radiohead and Bjork the biggest pile of crap for speaking out about the Independence of Tibet but forgetting about what happens in their own backyard.




http://1granary.com/central-saint-marti ... es/tigran/
tigran avetisyan might smile warmly, and speak kindly, but that doesn’t make his kick-ass collections any less punk. once with ambitions to pursue a career in designing coffins, the moscow-based csm graduate now 3d-prints perfume bottles, and admits to us that his collections are rooted in hate, before recalling his foundation days (where course-mates melted lindt chocolates to look like shit. not much has changed then…). we talk ‘normcore’, duty-free, and get nick knight involved to share his thoughts on tigran’s work, including this ‘underwear selfie set‘ and iphone case, which launches in the showstudio shop today.

What’s the story behind ‘Duty-Free’?
I was thinking how I’ve been traveling a lot recently, because I have to show my collections in quite a few places. I was in Florence Pitti, and then in Paris for bit and I took a lot of planes in between. I was really interested in seeing how people are consuming fashion, and how you can see there were perfumes everywhere. Everyone is into those perfumes, and everyone wants to buy a piece of the brand. It’s the thing most people would buy, and I thought that it would be really interesting to do my own perfume.
But actually, the starting point of the collection was the idea that a lot of fashion houses only exist because of a perfume. For instance, Mugler has Angel and Viktor and Rolf has Flowerbomb, which is one of the three best-selling perfumes. I was really obsessed with the idea of how you can have a fashion house that can keep on going, because of having a perfume. A lot of the collections that are produced by those houses – by Viktor & Rolf and a lot of brands – are just there to support sales of the perfume, so that’s a really messed up logic. Though it makes sense in the end, because they are earning money and they’re still around. So then I thought: what if I could make a perfume that would sell my collections instead, and do it the opposite way?

Spoiler:
How many are you selling?
Just one for now. If stores are interested, I would have to figure out how to mass-produce it. The bottle is a fully-functional 3D-printed model and you can spray it on yourself. It works great, but it’s really expensive to produce, so I’m not sure a lot of stores would buy it. There are ways to see and figure out the production methods, so I’ll see how it goes.

What does it smell like? What did you go for?
The ideas was very straightforward: just mix perfumes from duty-free shops together. It was a Chanel fragrance, Dolce & Gabbana, and then another two fragrances. They were not even real perfumes, they were copies of the scent from a store here in Russia. I couldn’t mix it at my studios, because it had to be flown over to London. I gave it to my girlfriend, and she mixed it, so I have no idea what it smells like.
To be honest, it didn’t really matter what it smelled like. It told my girlfriend to spray it on the clothes as well, so it feels like an Abercrombie and Fitch store in the showroom- but hopefully it doesn’t smell too bad.

What is your favorite perfume?
I hate perfumes actually. I don’t use them at all. Whenever I walk into a duty-free shop in the airport, my head gets really dizzy. I can never actually shop in there from all the different smells. I guess when I work it’s really important for me to dislike something really strongly. All my work comes from hate. I have to challenge myself and push myself. Otherwise, I can’t continue collections. For me it wouldn’t be different enough to just change shapes of the garments; it wouldn’t be challenging enough. For me it has to be something different. It has to almost not even be about fashion, but borderline something else. It has to challenge myself and the notions of fashion.
For this collection I was questioning: why can’t the lookbook start with a bottle? Why does it have to be a person? It’s the first look. The first look you see in my look book is the perfume bottle. The whole idea was based on the scent that I didn’t even smell.

What are you hating at this moment?
At the moment I just want to relax…

So you’re hating work?
Haha, yes exactly! I’m hating everything now! (laughs). But it’s very hard for me to be content. But so far the response has been really great.

What do you usually buy in Duty-Free shops, if not perfume?
I actually don’t buy anything in the shops, I just fly. I find it funny that you can shop in the airport. I just find it strange for this idea that while you’re waiting for your plane, you have to shop. I mean then why don’t they put a duty-free shop by a bus stop?

Do you miss your CSM days?
I miss it a lot, because I had a really great time during my last year. I really enjoyed making my collection, even though it was really hard. I have really dear memories. The new building is kind of crazy, it’s in Central London and you have people sunbathing by the train station.
But, I think I changed a lot after I graduated. I was very shy and didn’t socialize as much. It’s only now that I’m starting to meet people and people are contacting me through work, which is great.
I remember a lot of crazy shit on the Foundation course while at St. Martins. People were trying really hard to impress other people, like this one guy melting Lindt chocolates trying to pretend it was shit. I will always remember my first day at CSM. People wearing all this stuff that I had never seen before. Someone wore paper, one guy looked like a prince…I was blown away. People judged you by your looks, so people judged you by what you were wearing.

What did you do while on Foundation?
It’s actually quite funny, because I never thought that I would end up doing menswear, or even fashion to begin with. I was into Product Design a lot; making furniture. I actually wanted to be a coffin designer.

A coffin designer?
Yeah, a lot of things to consider when you design them. It’s a good market, there’s always a demand! The industry doesn’t die. (laughs).
But as I was saying, I wanted to be a furniture designer, and I was really excited to be able to go to CSM for that. I passed my foundation and went on to my first year. Around Christmas break of my first year, I realised that I was completely fed up with it; I didn’t want to design furniture any more. I didn’t really enjoy the course at all. It was really badly structured. People wouldn’t show up, they would be in for one day of the week to talk to their tutor and that’s it. In that whole year we had three projects in total. It was very very little. and I had this friend on the menswear course who was telling me how much they had to work, and how much was expected of them, and how everyone was so competitive. When I heard that, I just felt terrible with myself and my product design course. I was thinking how I was here at Central Saint Martins, and I was wasting my time and wasting my father’s money, so I decided to secretly apply during the Christmas holiday. I started working on my portfolio. And since I was a student at CSM already, I didn’t need to go through the complicated procedure. I just snuck into the menswear studio and handed my portfolio to the course director, Chris New.

Is coffin-design something you would still consider doing? You could 3D print it?
Haha yes, I could design the lining. Denim lining.

So what are things like in Moscow?
I have a studio here in Moscow, and my team is me, and my girlfriend helps out. I’m trying to figure out the business side of things. At least there is a demand for what I want to do, so it make things much easier. It would be nice to have a younger version of Robert Duffy, or a Pierre Bergé, but at the moment I’m working on it by myself.

How do you transport everything?
We just wrap everything up. This season I was very conscious of the fact that I had to make everything lighter, and it’s difficult to travel by suitcase. This year I’ve actually outdone myself; everything fits into one suitcase. The previous year it was four. On one end, I felt really good, and then on the other end I was asking myself how this was all possible. I made everything much lighter. Another thing that I wanted to challenge myself with, was with the fabrics. This season I used synthetic fabrics- apart from denim- and I was really excited to try that. Before I used to hate everything that was synthetic, and now I was like it’s Duty-Free, let’s make it as fake as possible. There was a lot of polyester and nylon, which was another challenge. Denim is one of the easiest fabrics to work with. It’s very easy to sew and manipulate. Polyester was a bit tricky. But you get used to these quirks for each fabric.

What’s it been like to work in Moscow, instead of here in London?
At first I was a bit upset of having to go back to Moscow. You almost feel like you’re going back in time, as well as geographically. It was hard in the beginning, but now I feel like I’ve gotten a really good perspective on things. I can be outside of this fashion bubble in London, and actually have an outsiders’ perspectives, instead of being caught up in all the issues.

So, what do you think is the main issue here in London, that you don’t want to be a part of?
Well, I think – not in London, but generally – and this may sound a bit big headed: a lack of ideas. There are so many collections and everything happen so fast, and I don’t think people have time to reflect on what everyone is doing. My collections are always a reflection of what has been happening last season; my work is inspired by previous seasons, always.

I remember that video you made called ‘The Interview’, which was about what lasts, and what will be next. What do you think of these things?
I think that my job is not to give answers, but to ask questions. I think that it would be too arrogant of me to give answers. I’m still trying to figure things out myself. As I was saying in my previous answer, I think that everything has been going so fast that there is no time to answer those questions, and with that collection, I really wanted to bring those questions up. What will remain after next season is over? It goes on non-stop, this fashion thinking.

There’s a statistic now that pre-collection sales make up 80% of a label’s profit…
A lot of people are doing resort collections now. I don’t remember seeing so many when I first started menswear. It’s a relatively new thing, and I think that it will keep piling up. I think in some distant future, there will be 6-8 collections a year. I feel like it’s getting really hard, like it’s getting out of hand. There will always be someone who does 6 collections instead of 4. At some point there will be a reaction to all of this, I think that there will be a backlash of so much fashion. It can’t go on forever.

And now “normcore” is a thing, it’s like fashionable anti-fashion…
The same thing happened to jeans, and a bunch of other things. Jeans used to be a ‘normcore’ fabric, and then they became a fashion statement. I think if you radically want to change fashion, you have to look at things on another level. It has to come from a different kind of mindset, because everything up until now has been about style. If you avoid wearing the latest fashion trends, you’re still making a statement. You’re still making a choice. It just has to be a different approach. But I don’t know what it should be. I’m trying to find a new approach.

How is the fashion in Moscow? Is it… ‘fashionable’?
It’s really unfashionable actually. There are maybe about 10 designers that are really good, maybe even less. But generally, on the street, normal people don’t really care about these things at all. Whenever I take public transport, I always question whether what I’m doing is really important or not, because I face these people who are not interested in any of my work, and will never be interested in any of my work.

Are you not trying to please your audience?
I really want to be liked (laughs). My favorite part of the collection is at the end, when the collection is finished, and when I get all the praise and the good reviews- all of the pats on the back and all the “well done”s. I hate all the hard work leading up to it. I wish people were more enthusiastic about the shows. We need to spread that news.

What do you think is the most exciting thing in fashion right now?
I really like what London designers are doing. Not all of them, but there are some really interesting graduates from CSM, who are showing at fashion week now. There are not that many that I’m interested in, because I’m not really interested in fashion in the ‘common sense’ of the word. As I was saying, the aesthetic part of it, is not the most important part of what I do. It doesn’t really matter if the lapel is 5cm or 6cm, as long as I can communicate my message in a challenging way, or in a way that is challenging for me, primarily. Then, I’m excited. But there are a lot of great people. Craig Green is one of them. Today I was finally speaking to one of my favorite designers from CSM, Luke Brooks. He’s very intriguing, and his work is such an flintstone for my collection. Apparently, he has seen my work before, and we talked today and agreed to meet up. He’s been such a big flintstone to my BA graduation collection, so I’m really excited to finally get to meet him. He showed his work at the MA show two years ago, in February at London Fashion Week during the year I was graduating. My show was three months after his. Before I saw his collection, there were no hints of paint in my collection, everything was so sleek- very sharp- and then I saw that collection, and it changed everything. Everything about his collection was different. I had to change everything. Before I painted stuff, I wanted to do a denim collection, really over-saturated with details, and then I took all those details down and I added paint. The chalk idea came to me completely at the last minute, as I said in my earlier interview with 1Granary, it was a complete accident as well. I had to change my collection after seeing Luke’s work, and I didn’t know where I could take it, what I could change. Chris New came into the studio one day and put a new message board next to my table, and I was staring at it for two days, and then there were these names written in chalk – our own names- and I just realised that those could be my prints for my collection. Before Luke’s show, I knew that I wanted to make the collection very tautological.

Everyone asks you about punk. Why do you think people always bring up the idea of you being a rebel, and the punk movement whenever you’re interviewed?
I don’t call it punk, I don’t really categorise in general. If people see it in that way, I don’t mind. It’s great that they have a response, and that they’re interested and engaged. And it’s great to see people take it somewhere else. I love seeing how people are wearing it, and how they style it. If it’s ‘punk,’ I don’t care. I call it ‘unexpressionism’ myself.

Thoughts from NICK KNIGHT on why he feels so engaged with Tigran’s work, deciding to stock it in the SHOWstudio shop.
You’ve previously shown Tigran’s films as part of the Punk film project, and sold his clothes in the Shop before. What is it about him that you find so interesting?
I like the poetic brutality to his work.

There’s definitely a cult/anarchic energy to his work, with a play on branding and slogans, which we see in brands like #BEENTRILL and HBA. Would you say that this approach is important for young designers?
No, it’s not an important approach for all young designers. But, I do think words/slogans help to speak the modern language. There was a continued use of prose and language in Pop Art in the 50s, and this use of language is continually important. The Internet is such a huge presence, and words can be transmitted so easily through it- it’s a new art form. The immediacy and easy proliferation of branding/logos make it very interesting to me.

From experience, working with young designers and stylists who go on to be successful, what is it you think they are doing right?
Speaking from the heart.

As an image maker, do you look for work that is ‘avant-garde’, or do you find as much beauty in more commercially-viable pieces?
Beauty is in everything, I wouldn’t limit it to a particular sector. You just need to know where to look for it.

With all the fashion that you’ve seen throughout your career, what is the thing that still makes you go ‘wow – I’d love to photograph that’ ?
Anything that changes/ affects my emotions.
Tigran Avetisyan interviewed by Jorinde Croese
Nick Knight interviewed by Greg French
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Re: Unexpressionism: Tigran Avetisyan

Postby germinal » Mon Jul 07, 2014 6:08 pm

I was lucky enough to see the ss15 collection in person at london collections men and i think it's very special indeed

i took some pics. you can't really tell but the way the printing process works means that creases are pressed into the fabrics, which are mostly artificial and so hold the crease very crisply. the ink doesn't permeate beneath the folds of the creases, as well as under collars, pocket flaps etc. It's a charming detail and emphasises the construction of the garment; he takes a 2-d fabric, constructs it into a 3-d garment, and then flattens it again.

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Re: Unexpressionism: Tigran Avetisyan

Postby germinal » Mon Jul 07, 2014 6:09 pm

He just released a collaboration with showstudio: an underwear selfie set and iphone case. I feel like commentary on selfie culture is a bit passe already but it's quite cool. I need a phone case but this one is a bit tacky please advise.

http://showstudio.com/shop/product/selfie_iphone_case

http://showstudio.com/shop/product/underwear_selfie_set

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Re: Unexpressionism: Tigran Avetisyan

Postby Syeknom » Mon Jul 07, 2014 6:17 pm

Feel like a bit tacky is the way forward

Those creased garms look amazingly fun. Love the stitching too, reminds me of the stitches i had.
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Re: Unexpressionism: Tigran Avetisyan

Postby bels » Mon Jul 07, 2014 6:37 pm

that phone case is market stall fodder.

Rest of the stuff is cool
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Re: Unexpressionism: Tigran Avetisyan

Postby smiles » Tue Jul 08, 2014 2:34 am

tigran was supposed to send me some of his stickers from the ss2014 campaign but he never did :/
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Re: Unexpressionism: Tigran Avetisyan

Postby germinal » Thu Sep 11, 2014 12:20 pm

Vfiles invited Tigran to show his ss15 stuff at nyfw;

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Re: Unexpressionism: Tigran Avetisyan

Postby une_impasse » Wed Mar 25, 2015 4:25 pm

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hey gang
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