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magazines

Postby germinal » Fri Aug 16, 2013 11:56 am

thread for

  • recommending magazines
  • scans
  • miscellaneous articles
  • discussion of the above
  • other things
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Re: magazines

Postby germinal » Fri Aug 16, 2013 1:47 pm

realised it's easier to just quote all this:

sknss wrote:what fashion magazines do you enjoy?


starfox64 wrote:sknss i like men's non-no. i've looked at sense (or black sense or whatever it's called) a few times, but that's not really my style. people seem to like popeye but i have not looked at it. these are all obviously men's magazines; i don't really have a clue about women's stuff. although i did read a rather fawning article about hedi in vogue from this month i think.


thomaspaine wrote:Inventory and New Order, cool photography and interviews. Off the top of my head in the last two issues I remember there being interviews with Hiroki, Raif Adelberg (wings + horns), Damir Doma, Nigo, and Scott Sternberg. Some of it is a little too next level for me, like this article Inventory did on Leslie Hewitt that just went way over my head.

I have a GQ subscription and think it's ok. Sorry guys.


starfox64 wrote:gq and esquire both have well-written and interesting articles but their fashion departments (which in my salad days were my favorite parts) are clearly targeted to people who are not me. the place where i get my hair cut has a subscription to both i think and i enjoy leafing through them when i am there.


thomaspaine wrote:That Buzz Bissinger article was great. I should carry a picture of that guy in my wallet to remind me to never become like him.


bela wrote:That Buzz B article shook me to the very core of my being. Made me desperately long for a detox.


starfox64 wrote:it just made me really sad. it's like reading about a middle aged heroin addict who still can't kick the habit.


germinal wrote:i like i-D, 032c, A magazine, AnOther, many of them, fantastic man (kind of), encens (kind of), apartamento, obscura, creative review

i like dazed's online content though never read the magazine

would like to have a look at acne paper, cosmic wonder press, granta, condiment and lucky peach, amongst others, i'm forgetting loads
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Re: magazines

Postby starfox64 » Fri Aug 16, 2013 8:48 pm

http://jmagazinescans.livejournal.com/

This site is updated fairly regularly. Weird that it's on livejournal though.

I have the past three issues of men's non-no at my apartment. I can put them up if they aren't on that site.
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Re: magazines

Postby sknss » Wed Aug 21, 2013 5:13 am

http://patrimoine.editionsjalou.com/lof ... -2010.html

The complete collection of L'officiel de la mode since 1920... in case you're bored.
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Re: magazines

Postby germinal » Thu Aug 29, 2013 7:12 am

Visionaire seems cool but also obscenely expensive (subscription starts at $500 for two issues, not including shipping). then again, the latest issue measures over 3 x 4 feet, so perhaps you're getting your money's worth

http://www.visionaireworld.com/

issue 20 the cdg issue
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Re: magazines

Postby germinal » Thu Sep 05, 2013 10:09 am

http://purple.fr/

purple INTERVIEW PURPLE FASHION MAGAZINE : S/S 2013 ISSUE 19

PHOEBE PHILO
a real life

interview by TIM BLANKS

portrait and unplublished pictures of recent CÉLINE campaigns by JUERGEN TELLER

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For years we’ve wanted to interview Phoebe Philo for Purple, and we are extremely happy that the British designer is finally ready to tell us more about her current state of mind. Formerly Creative Director at Chloé, she decided to take a two-year hiatus from fashion to devote time to her family. Once back at work, she took over and entirely reinvented the French fashion house Céline, creating lines of clothing that are fresh, unconventional, totally modern, elegantly sexy, visually surprising, and perfectly classic in an understated Parisian way that we like and admire. This is not only the result of her personal talent: Phoebe Philo has a strong work ethic and an uncompromising attitude that comes from the ’90s, when she got her rigueur and an obession for what she calls “real women.” Tim Blanks met her in her London studio, right after she showed her first collection following the birth of her third child. “I’m happy to be part of the conversation, but I do believe it’s all in the clothes, that stuff,” says Philo just as we start talking. “What we’re doing now is not necessary,” she continues, then she goes to the bathroom, to the point that I wonder if she’ll even come back. Which isn’t to say that she isn’t great company — droll as hell, quick to laugh, and hopelessly addicted to Chapstick. Her office, at Céline’s in London, in a stately Georgian house on Cavendish Square, hints at other worlds. Against one wall, a tired-glam tiger-print couch bought off the street for £10. Against another, a very smart piece by Mexican artist José Dávila featuring Marcel Duchamp precisely excised from a photograph, leaving just his silhouette. (The there/not there thing is very Phoebe.) And on the facing wall: a diamond-dust portrait of Joseph Beuys by Andy Warhol.

Spoiler:
PHOEBE PHILO — The glitter. I tried to make a fabric like it, but it’s real diamond dust, so I couldn’t.

TIM BLANKS — How do you do fabric research?

PHOEBE PHILO — At the moment, we’re in the process of archiving fabrics that I always return to: wools, felts, wool silks, cottons, classic fabrics that have been used over a long time in fashion. Parallel to that we develop technical fabrics, polyesters, nylons, lycras, horsehair, glitter, whatever it needs to be. I am into the idea of protecting a sense of the core, a Céline hand based in classicism.

TIM BLANKS — What kind of classicism?

PHOEBE PHILO — I find it reassuring to use fabrics that perform in a very honest, straightforward way. I like fabrics that are what they are. I find that comforting and inspiring.

TIM BLANKS — How much of that is to do with insecurity?

PHOEBE PHILO — As a person I have insecurities and as I get older, what I’m explaining re: fabric is relevant in lots of areas of my life. When I feel insecure I try and build safety around it. I’m not very good at being insecure and not knowing where it’s going to lead.

TIM BLANKS — You’re very careful about revealing too much about yourself, and yet surely that happens every time you do a show. Isn’t it masochistic to do something that is simultaneously so pleasurable for you and yet so painful in a way?

PHOEBE PHILO — There is a level of that. I push myself to go to places I don’t always want to go to and naturally in that process I expose myself. When I show my clothes I’m not among my 10 best friends so there is a baring of souls. Fashion never stops. Whatever happens, literally the show must go on, the date is set and whether we’re ready or not we have to do a show on that day. It is a love-hate relationship. It’s challenging sometimes and not that easy, but it’s also what makes it so intense and thrilling.

TIM BLANKS — Is it easier some­times more than others?

PHOEBE PHILO — Every show has its own story. I’ve never had two shows the same.

TIM BLANKS — How was this one for you?

PHOEBE PHILO — It was one of the tougher ones, coming back after having my third child and having had some time off with him. I’d been giving life in a big way at home, then coming back and giving life to a collection, that put more pressure.

TIM BLANKS — You talked about it being a collection about love and friends.

PHOEBE PHILO — I came to a conclusion at the end of that show that there was a lot of humility in the process of making it. There were real limitations with my time that I had due to having another child.

TIM BLANKS — Maybe when you say that about being home a lot, that was why the show felt a little bit domestic to me, kind of fluffy-slippers cosy.

PHOEBE PHILO — If that existed it was completely subconscious [laughs]. It came very much from being at home and being in a particular place of nurturing a small baby.

TIM BLANKS — So now you have three children. Weren’t you one of three, too?

PHOEBE PHILO — Yes I am the eldest.

TIM BLANKS — How do you balance family and work?

PHOEBE PHILO — My family is my priority. My role is making sure my children and my home are well. I’m in love with my work, so I carve out a lot of time for it. It’s a privilege to be involved in something that I feel so passionately about.

TIM BLANKS — Can you turn it off when you get home?

PHOEBE PHILO — I’ve got a very natural cut-off at holidays and weekends. Having kids helps that.

TIM BLANKS — What’s your own earliest memory?

PHOEBE PHILO — Receiving a plastic molded farm-set for my third birthday. There was a pond in the middle and the fact it held water was amazing to me. Actually, pond life is one of my favorite things; newts, frogs. I love watching a tadpole turn into a miniature little frog then it grows big and moves on.

TIM BLANKS — Funny, you always seemed so West-London urban.

PHOEBE PHILO — Nature and the countryside are in me, partly to do with growing up in suburbia, which was almost the best and worst of all worlds. What suburbia gives you is space. We lived in a house with a big garden that backed on to a wild wasteland, before you got to the railway tracks. The backland, we called it, and I spent a huge amount of time there with a friend when I was about 11, in a fantasy world, making cigarettes out of leaves and card, trying desperately to keep them flaxy, lugging on them hard.

TIM BLANKS — Sophisticated…

PHOEBE PHILO — … and bad. We tried stealing cigarettes, but there wasn’t a steady supply so we reverted to making our own.

TIM BLANKS — And the fantasy?

PHOEBE PHILO — There was a lot of me and my pretend pony. What was good about that period was there was a lot of boredom. I was obsessed with horses and I didn’t have one, so I’d pretend I was on my horse, cantering around the field in my imagination, smoking my cigarette in full-on riding gear. That idea of solitude, being in my own space, having to entertain myself, not needing people…

TIM BLANKS — Did you get bothered by boys?

PHOEBE PHILO — No.

TIM BLANKS — Were you pretty?

PHOEBE PHILO — Pretty average. A bit odd looking.

TIM BLANKS — Deliberately?

PHOEBE PHILO — No, just naturally [laughs]. I don’t know if I’ve ever felt that weird. I just always felt average. Longing to discover something new and leave suburbia.

TIM BLANKS — So that was the Culture Club era, 1981

PHOEBE PHILO — Yes, I must have been 8 or 9 when I first saw Boy George. I was fascinated that she was a he and that that was possible. I remember seeing him on Top of the Pops and being amazed that that was a man and loving that possibility.

TIM BLANKS — How else did your appetite for badness manifest itself at that age?

PHOEBE PHILO — I used to bleach my hair and give myself haircuts. I pierced my nose and my friend’s ears myself. It was all very innocent, very in the moment. ‘I like this, I want to look like this.’ Buy a packet of hair dye and do it immediately.

TIM BLANKS — Were your parents scared?

PHOEBE PHILO — Never. My parents allowed me in a wonderful way to go through all the motions of growing up, make all the mistakes. I don’t remember much intervention.

TIM BLANKS — I’m asking these questions because I have a strong sense of those experiences distilled into the stuff now. There is that wonderful taint of badness, anti-purity. Now that you’ve laid the ground rules for Céline, do you think there’s a natural urge to fuck it up a little bit?

PHOEBE PHILO — That sort of destroy-what-you’ve-just-done-in-order-to-move-on is part of how I do move forward. There’s definitely an element of that in me. After a show, I generally go into a feeling of not even wanting to look at it, and then I start to go back and we shoot the campaign and I get reconnected to it. Then I try to take what I like and carry it forward, pushing it further.

TIM BLANKS — What would you say the consistent threads are?

PHOEBE PHILO — One of the main ones is fabric but there is silhouette, how we construct things and a constant learning that gets carried forward.

TIM BLANKS — That seems kind of limiting to me. Cloth is so solid, so finite. Do you find limitations inspiring?

PHOEBE PHILO — I do, I find uniforms one of the most inspiring ways of wearing clothes and it’s something I revisit. I love the fact that there’s a limitation with a real template and structure. It is what it is. I naturally gravitate toward the discipline of limits.

TIM BLANKS — Is that a life lesson, something you’ve learned because you’ve been in situations where there were no limits?

PHOEBE PHILO — I think so. I’ve figured out a lot of it along the way. Some of it is a result of the speed at which fashion works.

TIM BLANKS — No, I mean personally, when you’ve lived quite a wild life and you realize the sanity, the self-preservation of restraint.

PHOEBE PHILO — Well, let’s just say it’s through experience of life that I’ve got to working the way I do.

TIM BLANKS — Because you know what your dark side is capable of?

PHOEBE PHILO — Sometimes. Not always. It can still appear, surprising me. I guess it’s growing up.

TIM BLANKS — It’s always there. If you have a dark side, you can never totally put it in the closet.

PHOEBE PHILO — I am what I am. I have my complexities, I don’t claim to be simple or straightforward. I can’t change some of those things, but I can certainly manage them.

TIM BLANKS — I’ve always wondered how much work is a safety valve for designers. You can release all your willful waywardness in your clothes.

PHOEBE PHILO — It’s those parameters we were talking about: the base of fabrics, the clear sense of work we’ve done so far that I want to carry forward. I like to make a clear structure where I can lose myself in whatever it needs to be that season.

TIM BLANKS — And yet you project this incredible innocence, which is discombobulating when the clothes, especially in the last collection, had that strange, worldly, louche, slightly careless quality. I know I said ‘cozy’ but they were a bit promiscuous and wayward too. And here you are looking younger and more innocent than ever…

PHOEBE PHILO — That will be my excellent plastic surgeon [laughs].

TIM BLANKS — Yeah, acquiring the trappings of a big life — big job, big family — but never growing old or getting jaded. I wonder if that’s what you’re offering to women, the sense that they could be that too.

PHOEBE PHILO — I’m looking forward to being an older woman. I’m 39 now, and I’m intrigued by much older women. I don’t know if you get wiser but I was brought up to show respect to older people, which I like and which I think is important. I respect life, and people who have suffered but survived. I find that totally inspiring. It gives you hope, and a way to go.

TIM BLANKS — Strength is one way your clothes are characterized, and people have responded to them as a new sort of tribe for women, but I find it interesting that there’s also a kind of solitary spirit in there too.

PHOEBE PHILO — I definitely have to force myself to be with people, it’s not a natural thing.

TIM BLANKS — It’s in the way Juergen shoots them too. How did the collaboration begin?

PHOEBE PHILO — I’ve known Juergen for quite a while; he and his wife are family friends. We also shared the same agent, Katy Baggott, who was a great friend and collaborator, which meant there were some shared values and ways of working between us all. After my first pre-collection Juergen called me, we had a coffee together and talked through some ideas he had about shooting the campaign. He lives two minutes away from me in London, which means there are no weird time zones or added complexities for us to be able to meet or talk. Knowing him and the ease at which the conversation started felt like the right way to go. It is a real collaboration, meaning we find a middle ground that works for us both. I admire Juergen, his journey, his work and his opinions. We talk, meet, bounce back and forth on ideas about the woman — where she is, what she is doing, what she stands for. I think we have some shared interests which we talk about: art, family, holidays, food and basically a load of fuckery. I think we both know what we like and in some ways are very uncompromising in what we believe in.

TIM BLANKS — Do you think you’ve created a new kind of elegance with the campaigns?

PHOEBE PHILO — I think we show a woman that we know, understand, who is real to us. At the end of the day, Juergen is the one taking the picture and the proximity he is able to get, his eye and where it leads him add elements that I cannot predict and are unique to him.

TIM BLANKS — He certainly understands what I was calling the solitary spirit.

PHOEBE PHILO — I know what you mean, but I never would have given it that label. Solitude is choice. When I’m with people, I’m thoroughly engaged, but I do have a sense of not needing them sometimes. Ironically I have very little time to myself these days.

TIM BLANKS — What would you do if you had that time?

PHOEBE PHILO — I would do what I did before, spend a lot of it in my home hanging out, be spontaneous, go out and see what happens.

TIM BLANKS — I remember we had a conversation when you’d been off for a while and you were wondering what to do, and I said you should open your own shop and have an on-line business. [laughter]

PHOEBE PHILO — Thank god you’re not my business manager.

TIM BLANKS — You were scared that people would forget you.

PHOEBE PHILO — There you go on insecurity! Did I say that? I don’t remember feeling that. It was a risk to leave a job and to go to nothing. I must have seen you on one of my fuck-what-am-I doing days! Taking a break was a very good thing though. I had a huge amount of pleasure in taking it. I always knew I wanted, maybe even needed, to work. My life is full and I wouldn’t want to change it, but unquestionably, there are some tensions sometimes in fitting it all in. Because of my life outside work and because I am disciplined about leaving work on time, I sometimes feel frustration that I can’t give more to work and see ideas realized more.

TIM BLANKS — How would that have affected the last collection, for instance?

PHOEBE PHILO — I have a feeling with every show, if I just had three more days… The whole process — edit, grow, edit, grow — that’s the nature of always wanting to go forward. Thank God there is a cut-off and you have to start something new; otherwise I drive myself and everyone else mad, but I have a sense I could have taken it further if I had just a bit more time.

TIM BLANKS — How much do you reject?

PHOEBE PHILO — 70 percent.

TIM BLANKS — Has there ever been a time when you’ve said “This is as good as it’s going to get?”

PHOEBE PHILO — Yes, when I was heavily pregnant. I was more in touch with my physical limitations. I’m not saying I was happiest with it, but I was the most able to say “This it the best I can do. I have to leave the office now. I need to stop standing up.”

TIM BLANKS — What guides you in designing?

PHOEBE PHILO — [long pause]. A real life. What I think Céline is to me. It’s instinct, but at a certain point I connect with my brain to pull it all together.

TIM BLANKS — What do you mean you think about what Céline is?

PHOEBE PHILO — I think about what we’ve created in our time here and what that stands for and how to nurture and grow it.

TIM BLANKS — Knowing the emotional intricacies of some designers’ life can help to appreciate their work. Maybe that same point will apply to you one day, the way you meshed your family, your work, resuscitated a heritage business, and whatever you do next.

PHOEBE PHILO — I feel aware at the moment that our time on this planet is very short and I don’t have a sense of wanting to leave a legacy because it all evaporates into thin air eventually, and that’s fine.

TIM BLANKS — So isn’t it funny when people attach cultural significance to a fashion designer? You’ve become emblematic of a state of mind.

PHOEBE PHILO — Which is?

TIM BLANKS — You tell me. You must have a sense of why women love your clothes.

PHOEBE PHILO — I hope they identify with me, because I identify with them. I’m a woman living in a very real world. I have responsibilities at work and at home, dealing every day with trying to get everybody’s needs met.

TIM BLANKS — And how do clothes work in that context?

PHOEBE PHILO — For me personally, there’s a structure with them. Again, it’s like a uniform. I wear pretty much the same types of clothes day-in, day-out. I know what works for me practically. I have to literally be able to move around; what I really don’t like is being restricted.

TIM BLANKS — But I think about Céline as offering women this very chic, pulled-together, structured reassurance, and I always see you like this, looking much more sloppy and beatnik-y. Is this Céline?

PHOEBE PHILO — Yes. I have a natural ability of making everything look quite fucked [laughs]. I do get what you mean, but I find that strength in what we offer. A wardrobe and within that people find where they want to be. I hope there is some freedom within that. I don’t like clothes imposing themselves on women. They are to be used in a real life. There is nothing else in life that we keep as close to us, literally wearing it on our bodies as we do clothes, so the relationship by definition is incredibly close.

TIM BLANKS — I felt the last collection was probably the closest to the way you would wear the clothes.

PHOEBE PHILO — Maybe that goes back to that domestic thing.

TIM BLANKS — Maybe being at home gave you the confidence to totally impress your own needs on the collection. See, it’s all autobiographical.

PHOEBE PHILO — But that’s exactly what good fashion design is. It’s about a vision, real life, a person. I think we’ve gone through a period where designers were quite removed from what they did. I feel like we’re back in a period where they’re very connected. A lot of bullshit has gone down over the years as well as some amazing, inspiring stuff. I only have time for doing this from the heart and gut and getting a job done well. I want Céline to have an independent agenda. [Editor’s note: Phoebe is making a coat for James White, an artist and friend. That’s her first foray into menswear, something that intrigues her because she insists she knows nothing about it. And yet menswear is all about limits, and we know how she loves limits.] It’s about getting back to base, this sense of clear parameters. Whatever creativity and ideas I have to come can then be more chaotic and spontaneous if they need to be.

TIM BLANKS — Do you think it’s going to get more chaotic from now on?

PHOEBE PHILO — I have no idea, I don’t have such a long-term sense of where my creativity is going. I have a feeling of next season and that’s it. Each season is taking a step, one after the other…

TIM BLANKS — But if you say you’re still wild…

PHOEBE PHILO — You said I was wild. I would never describe myself in that way, but there have been wild times. I’m building collections where I’m able to be spontaneous and yes, there’s some disruption, corruption, distortion and organized chaos … a bit of a fight going on.

TIM BLANKS — Even an unfinished hem can do that.

PHOEBE PHILO — Yes, a feeling of it being built up, then a slight ripping apart.

END
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Re: magazines

Postby germinal » Sun Sep 08, 2013 11:08 am

Scene mag

May 2013

The Passion of Thom Browne

models Natalie Keyser & Monika Borowska
photographed by An Le
styled by Marcus Mateo
hair by Dhiran Mistry
makeup by Jason "Sparrow" Willard.

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Re: magazines

Postby germinal » Sun Sep 08, 2013 11:16 am

dust magazine

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DUST IS A BIANNUAL MAGAZINE BORN IN 2010 BASED BETWEEN BERLIN AND LONDON AND DISTRIBUTEDWORLDWIDE. THE INTENT OF THE PROJECT IS TO EXPLORE THE UNIVERSE OF YOUTH, IN THE CONTEXT OF A PRESENT TIME MARKED BY A CONTINUOUS STATE OF CRISIS. OUR INTEREST IS TO ENLIGHTEN THE GENUINE AND NON-CODIFIED ASPECTS OF YOUTH AND OF THE NEW EMERGING GENERATION BY DIRECTING OUR GAZE FAR FROM INSTITUTIONALIZED GEOGRAPHY AND TRENDS, AND ABOVE THE CURRENT STANDARDIZATION THAT TENDS TO CONFORM THE EXPERIENCE OF YOUTH IN REGULATED FORMS. IN OUR RESEARCH WE CROSS CONFLICTING TERRITORIES, WHERE STRUCTURES COLLAPSE AND THE WESTERN CODES OF APPEARANCES DISSOLVE INTO DIFFERENT KINDS OF CHOICES, DIFFERENT KINDS OF DYNAMICS. WE LIKE TO UNDERLINE A SILENT GEOGRAPHY, AT THE MARGIN OF MAINSTREAM PATHS, IN ORDER TO REDISCOVER A STRONGER ATTACHMENT TO LIFE, SOMEHOW MORE VITAL, GENUINE AND AWAKE; SOMETHING THAT IS HARD TO FIND IN THE ANESTHETIZED YOUTH PRESENTED BY THE DISORIENTED CIRCULATING CULTURE. THE TERRITORY IN WHICH WE DIG IS ‘THE CRISIS’ AS THE ELECTED PLACE WHERE TO REDESIGN FORMS, IDEAS, VALUES AND STRATEGIES FOR OUR GENERATION TO EMBRACE A DIFFERENT WAY TO CONCEIVE OF LIFE. WE OBSERVE THE COLLAPSE OF STABILITIES TAKING PLACE GLOBALLY AS AN IRREVERSIBLE SHIFT OF SCENARIO THAT’S PUSHING YOUTH TO AN URGENCY OF CHANGE, AN URGENCY TO FIND A NEW AND PROPER VISION. AS MANY DO, WE FEEL RENEWAL TO BE NECESSARY IN ALL FIELDS, BASED ON A MORE PERSONAL SENSIBILITY. IN LIGHT OF OUR CONCERNS AND INTERESTS, THE REALMS OF COMMUNICATION, VISUAL CULTURE, ART AND FASHION NEED TO BE RECONSIDERED FROM A NEW POINT OF VIEW. OUR MAGAZINE IS INTENT ON CREATING, WITHIN THE LIMITS OF ANY CULTURAL PRODUCT PRESENT IN THE MARKET, THIS NEW VISION. WE CONSIDER THE MAGAZINE A LABORATORY OF IDEAS AND CONCEPTS THROUGH WHICH WE SEARCH FOR A NEW ESTHETIC AND TO GIVE THE IMAGE NEW VALUE. OUR PERSONAL INTERESTS GO BEYOND THE IDEA OF COOLNESS, TRENDS, WAVES OR ANYTHING ESTABLISHED BY POP CULTURE. WE PREFER TO DIRECT OUR GAZE TO THE BASIC, GENUINE WAY THROUGH WHICH YOUTH EXPRESSES ITSELF, FROM WHERE EVERYTHING SHOULD BE RECONSIDERED.


http://www.dustmagazine.com/

http://dustmagazine.tumblr.com/

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Re: magazines

Postby sknss » Sun Sep 08, 2013 2:37 pm

Jalouse September 2013
http://www.jalouse.fr

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pretty crazy editorial featuring the french actress lea seydoux as the cover girl (with a zit on the chin(!))

Donkeys, Pigs, Poneys And Lea...
Léa Seydoux by Juergen Teller

Stylist: Jennifer Eymére
Hair and Make-up: Anthony Preel

Spoiler:
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Re: magazines

Postby germinal » Sat Sep 14, 2013 5:32 am

sz-mag

A FEW WORDS WITH: JOHN SKELTON OF LN-CC
by Jana Melkumova-Reynolds

In only a couple of years of its existence, LN-CC, the London multiple-brand boutique has gone from an open secret of the fashion cognoscenti to a major player whose business model is quickly being imitated by other shops. John Skelton, the store’s co-founder and creative director, has played a major role in its meteoric rise. I recently caught up with him in London to talk shop…

- You’ve just come back from scouting for new designers in Poland. How was it?

⁃ There are interesting things happening there, foodwise and otherwise, but when it comes to fashion the product is still very young and underdeveloped, to be honest.

I don’t want to be detrimental about anything, don’t want to say what’s good and what’s bad, but what we found there was really costume-like, whereas we were hoping to find some raw industrial energy like, say, that of Gosha’s [Rubchinsky].

⁃ It must be difficult to do what you do – trying to find young fresh talent, while not lowering your high product standards.

⁃ Yes, and in that sense fashion is very different from, say, music. You get incredible tracks that people with no money and no name make in their bedrooms, but you cannot really make an incredible collection in your bedroom.

⁃ Fashion, unlike music, is right in the middle between material and immaterial production: it’s as much about ideas as it is about physical product.

⁃ And this is why young designers can never compete with big brands – the quality is never that good, the fit isn’t right. In fashion, having the backing of a production facility makes a real difference. Sometimes you get the odd youngster who has access to really good production – like Yang Li who uses Prada’s manufacturers – but it is very rare.

⁃ Speaking about ‘youngsters’ who make remarkable product: what happened to Tze Goh – you don’t stock him anymore?

⁃ Sometimes the product is not developed enough for the customer, and with Tze it was the customer who was not developed enough for the product. People who paid for it and own it will have it forever and ever; it’s so real, it makes mainline product look shoddy – it’s that good! Probably the best product we’ve ever had. But it’s too advanced, too good for the normal person. Tze was really pushing the envelope. He’s more of an artist: he created something so specific that only a handful of people in the world would understand and wear. And then, his stuff is so delicate, it is sometimes difficult to care for.

⁃ I often ask myself if garments really fulfill their raison d’etre only when worn – only when referring to a body. Things like those Tze makes could be admired solely for their aesthetic and symbolic properties, like sculptures or paintings. Why are there so few clothing collectors around?

⁃ The problem is, people who buy a lot of clothes are generally very wealthy but they won’t necessarily buy clothes they want to keep and just stare at. And for someone who is really into clothes but isn’t super rich it’s not really an option financially, to collect things that retail at £1500 – this is why record or book collections are much more usual.

Great clothes are expensive, precisely because of that ‘material production’ aspect. Even in places like Japan where you expect people to have serious archives there’s not much of a clothes collecting culture – I spoke to some journalists who were doing a book on it: they went out and saw some people’s collections and they weren’t all that impressive. They’d have maybe 30 pieces, good pieces, but you couldn’t call it a real archive.

Having said that, I am a clothes collector – I do buy stuff just to put it away. It all started when I was 15 and began buying Raf and never stopped – I owned about 300 pieces at some point. Then I started collecting Damir and amassed around 180 pieces since he started in 2008.

⁃ Let’s talk a bit about Raf: in most of your interviews you go on about how he was a real flintstone to you. So what did you think of what he did for Dior?

⁃ I think it’s unbelievable – especially the first RTW show. The last two, couture and ready-to-wear, were stunning, elegant, but the first was a lot more advanced – these tailoring shapes with silky sheeny, on-the-edge fabrics, with a masculine flavour but very feminine – that was really pushing it forward.

⁃ And that was the show he got totally lambasted for.

⁃ Yes – and when you see what Hedi did for Saint Laurent and all the hype he got for that… I know we work in a very subjective field, and I think it’s all about what train you’re on, and the press is on a ‘rough’ train at the moment so they’re all saluting Hedi.

From a product enthusiast point of view I cannot see why what’s happening at Saint Laurent is better than what’s happening at Dior, as Dior is streets ahead…

Yet I can very well remember that real rage of excitement I had the first time Hedi put down checked shirts and ragged denim at Dior – it was 2001. He got tortured, the press hated it, no one was on it. I remember all these grungy kids in super skinny jeans, and people were coming out of the show like [with a mock posh accent] ‘I can’t believe he put bloody denim on the runway, this is the House of Dior!’

But soon they figured this was what was happening. It changed 00s as far as menswear, and it’s very much still the aesthetic of Dior man’s look now; and it’s what Hedi still does now, only for women – but it’s been 12 years!..

Raf, on the contrary, has always been moving around – one minute it’s street influenced, the next it’s sleek tailoring. And for me, the genius is in this movement.

⁃ So was Raf your first love in fashion?

⁃ My first passion was actually Prada, when I was 15-16 – it was super tailored, techno stretch, colours like plums, navys, beiges. When I grew up in Northeast England no one was wearing that.

⁃ So how did you do your research in mid 90s in North East England? Internet wasn’t really a big thing then.

⁃ I didn’t know anything about the Internet. What interested me was the people around me. I had a friend 6 years older than me, and he was really into Westwood… Then I went to work for a store on the weekends, they were selling Prada, Raf, Dries, Comme, it was a really good store.

Again, there were interesting people working there, and once you get to know the people you realize who is REALLY into fashion.

And the magazines were my bible, I was buying them every week – i-D, Face, etc. – reading them inside out.

After a year or two I moved to Newcastle and worked for a bigger shop, and associated with a guy there. So there were two inspirations – magazines and people.

⁃ Was it OK to be a bloke who’s into fashion, in the mid-90s in the Northeast?

⁃ In Newcastle it was, in Sunderland too. It’s an interesting setup there, they’re not all ‘manly’ men; there was a big ‘posers’ scene – your hair always needs to be good, that kind of thing.

The Northeast has got that pocket of music and fashion, there’s a real thirst for the arts. What you have to remember as well is that people who live in a small town and have taste might not want to move, say, to London – they’d rather make it in their town. The stores I worked for in Middlesborough and Newcastle, these guys really went out on a limb, they were proud to bring Prada to their hometown.

⁃ Did you always know you wanted to open a store?

⁃ I’d always said I wanted to become the creative director of something. After I left Harrods I got that with Oki-ni and I really enjoyed it – it was still a store but I wasn’t just buying for it, I was responsible for everything. But then I realized I’m not that good with certain things like look and feel, detail, environment, graphics etc. I’m not even into home – my house isn’t an amazing spectacle…

⁃ No?! That’s precisely how I imagined it!

⁃ No, it’s just where I live and keep my clothes. Luckily I realized it quickly: I’m not an in-and-out creative – I’m just really into product. So when we started LN-CC I got friends and partners involved so we split it – I take care of the product, Dan is more about the environment and how the website looks, and so on.

Successful people are good at understanding what needs to be done and putting the right people in the right jobs. That’s something I didn’t get before; I thought it was about being that all-round creative, but I’m not interested in that. I’m interested in having a well-rounded offer, and it doesn’t matter who does what.

So no, I never wanted to have my own shop or even be a buyer, I was just into clothes. It’s very simple to notice when somebody is really into something.

⁃ And – I’m sure you’ve been asked that before – have you ever thought of doing your own collection?

⁃ No, I don’t think I’m a designer. I’m in tune with the flow but I don’t think I could create the flow.

If you put a garment it in front of me I know if it’s ‘right’ or ‘wrong’, but the thing about designing is that it’s not about ‘What’s going to happen next?’, it’s about ‘What do I want to express?’

I’m much more of a collector – I express myself through finding things rather than creating things.

⁃ Before LN-CC you’ve always worked with menswear – in Triads, Strand, Harrods, Selfridges, Oki-ni. How was it to branch into womenswear?

⁃ Up until 5 years ago I wasn’t even particularly interested in women’s fashion. But then when you get to a level with something, where you really know something you still explore it but you realize you will never surprise yourself. And I got there with menswear – this is not to say I know menswear but I know my own perception of it, and it’s not going to change.

So I thought that if I managed to translate what I liked in menswear into womenswear it could be quite interesting. At first I thought the transition would be easy, but the more I discover womenswear the more i realize it’s not that straightforward.

Frankly, I think only now we are getting to a point where our women’s selection is as good. But I’ve learnt so much about myself and how I want a woman to look, as opposed to ‘what women want to wear’.

⁃ So how do you want her to look?

⁃ At first I tried to dress the girls like the guys, but I think it was just the state of the industry. At the time there was a lot of designers in a similar situation – with a strong menswear background and branching into womenswear for the first time: Damir, then Raf, Haider… So it was like, ‘let’s make womenswear more masculine’. Some stronger youngsters were pushing it, and it had a ripple effect. Never before has there been so much straight man influence on women’s fashion.

But I am not sure that’s the way to go: there’s a very fine line between looking like a guy and having a masculine influence. The gay man’s extreme interpretation of womenswear comes out as too effeminate, whereas a straight man’s interpretation may not be feminine enough…

⁃ Traditional ‘gendered’ femininity makes me think of trannies though. When I dress like that – heels, red lipstick and all – I feel like a transvestite, wearing a mask of femininity rather than projecting my natural femininity. Traditional femininity feels artificial – you could argue this artificiality is culturally determined.

⁃ Yes, and I think the world is just a much more realistic place at the moment, and men are naturally more realistic than women. But women’s fashion doesn’t need menswear to take it over, it needs some sympathetic understanding of a woman’s body, and a little hint of toughness. I think that’s where it’s at, that’s what’s happening in the right brands: Raf, Haider… Some other designers have played with sharp tailoring for a season or two but reverted to frilly, traditionally feminine styles again for FW13.

- They probably had big bad sales teams on their backs, saying ‘we’ve sold this dress really well so we need more of this next season’.

⁃ And this is an argument for what we do: it’s all a whole load of nonsense – how fashion gets contorted by the people who are actually not at all interested in the product. The designer wants to do one thing, the sales team wants another thing, the result is something in the middle that gets shown to the press and they make what they will out of it, but they never dare to criticize even if they don’t really like it so they water their criticism down to please the advertiser…

You gotta get on board and support people and say what you think. Look at Business Of Fashion – they run articles that can be classified as quite risque – you’ve only got to support those guys for bringing up real issues with real people. You’ve got to support the reality within the industry! All this sell-through report obsession – many stores indeed just buy what you guys bought last season, and this is stagnating fashion. We try to really get on board and break the mould.

⁃ But if something sold well last season, surely you will buy it again?

⁃ Never! We don’t take sell through information with us. We don’t write orders based on what we’ve sold. In fact, if we see something we sold well last season we skip it as we’ve already had it. We try be real and do really what we think, and to move constantly, because without movement none of it makes sense.


http://www.sz-mag.com/news/2013/08/a-fe ... -of-ln-cc/
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Re: magazines

Postby germinal » Mon Sep 16, 2013 8:34 am

Interview mag

http://www.interviewmagazine.com/fashio ... yamamoto-1

Yohji Yamamoto
By Wim Wenders

Image

Athleticism is rarely a quality praised, or even acknowledged, in fashion. But it is also one that is hard to dismiss in a designer like Yohji Yamamoto, who once concluded a runway show with a martial-arts demonstration in which he appeared to karate-chop a male model.

Along with Issey Miyake and Rei Kawakubo, Yamamoto was, of course, at the fore of an influential wave of avant-garde designers who emerged from Japan in the 1970s and early 1980s. Born into wartime Tokyo in 1943, he first studied law, but opted instead to go to work for his mother, a seamstress, and enroll in Bunka Fashion College. It was after a brief sojourn in Paris that he established his first label, Y's, in Tokyo in 1972, debuting his eponymous line back in the French capital nine years later and blowing away the tight dresses and padded shoulders of the sartorial moment with the billows of dark fabric and a brand of intellectual playfulness that instantly earned him a place as one of the most forward-looking, paradigm-breaking, and versatile artists in contemporary fashion. But for a man whose work has consistently been associated with the cutting edges of things, Yamamoto has always remained remarkably trend-phobic, choosing to operate within a framework that has less to do with the whims of seasons and more to do with the development of ideas, as exemplified by his frequently loose, asymmetrical cuts, enveloping drapes, ample uses of black, and recurring flirtations with sexuality and androgyny. In this way—as well as others—Yamamoto has always described his relationship with fashion as one built around a kind of tension that's palpable in his clothes, where freedom (you can dream up whatever you want) and restriction (you are beholden to commerce, rules, reactions, and deadlines) are in a constant tug-of-war.

But back to athleticism: At the end of the 1980s, Yamamoto took up karate, eventually earning his black belt and embarking on a kind of sporting life that would undoubtedly inform another of his endeavors. In 2002, Yamamoto began collaborating with Adidas on Y-3, a line of sneakers, exercise clothes, and other active-minded pieces that applied the high-fashion sharpness of his main line to sportswear. As Yamamoto recalls, the idea for Y-3 first emerged when he requested some sneakers from Adidas for a show, which was intended as a subversive nod to the brand's currency with street kids in Japan, who, at the time, were going through one of their periodic infatuations with triple-striped track suits. The conversation that ensued led to a discussion about Adidas creating some special sneakers for Yamamoto, which led to another discussion about more fashiony nips, tucks, and variations that could be applied to other kinds of athleticwear, and ultimately to the development of the entire line, which came to include accessories and even fragrances. Indirectly, Y-3 also paved the way for other fashion-sportswear brand collaborations (as well as the advent of the designer sneaker), and helped establish a stronger, more frequently traveled bridge between the runways and the street—the impact of which, among other things, has been a profound increase in the speed with which the ideas and attributes of high fashion wend their way into how people dress in their daily lives.

The merging and intermingling of these disparate worlds has become an area of frequent exploration for a number of designers on both sides of the aisle—and one that Yamamoto has continued to examine, and even comment on, in his own work. In fact, it was at the end of a laser-lit, superhero-themed Y-3 show in 2010 that Yamamoto tapped into his considerable gifts as both a martial artist and a performance artist in delivering the aforementioned karate-chop, a sudden blow that leveled his opponent—after which the designer himself was swiftly taken out by one of his female models.

Filmmaker Wim Wenders, who memorably captured Yamamoto in his own habitat for the 1989 documentary Notebook on Cities and Clothes, recently reconnected with the designer, now 69, in Tokyo to discuss 10 years of Y-3, how he maintains his edge, and why it's still best not to mess with him in a dark alley.


WIM WENDERS: Where are you right now?

YOHJI YAMAMOTO: I'm just finishing up in my room at the office.

WENDERS: You always work so late.

YAMAMOTO: Where are you?

WENDERS: I'm in the office, too—in Berlin. But it's in the middle of the day here. So you had a long day again as usual?

YAMAMOTO: Very, very busy—and yes, that's the usual. You know, at this point, I've become like a clothes-making machine.

WENDERS: I don't know anyone who keeps the hours that you keep. But it's good to hear your voice. I wish I could be in Tokyo with you right now. We could go play some pool and eat some blowfish.

YAMAMOTO: Yes, I remember—the poison fish.

WENDERS: You took me to the restaurant that served that poison blowfish, and I thought, "This is very, very dangerous, because any little mistake the cook makes . . . You die." [both laugh] I was so nervous—even the dessert there seemed like poison dessert. But we survived it.

YAMAMOTO: Yes, we did. Do you remember the bet?

WENDERS: Which one? [laughs] Oh, the pool game.

YAMAMOTO: Exactly.

WENDERS: I lost—or I think I lost. Do you think you lost?

YAMAMOTO: I think I won the bet.

WENDERS: Yes, you won . . . Absolutely. And now it all comes back to me! We said that if I lost, then I would have to take part in a men's show and go on the catwalk.

YAMAMATO: You still have to do it!

WENDERS: I will! I remember when Samuel Fuller walked in your men's show in Paris. That was so fabulous! Sam was so proud to be showing your clothes. I would be, too—I'm doing it all the time anyway. I've had to fix some of the old suits because I've had them as long as we've known each other—or even longer.

YAMAMOTO: You are a very good dresser. [laughs]

WENDERS: I wasn't before. Over the years, though, I have developed a sixth sense when it comes to who is wearing Yohji. I can see it right away.

YAMAMOTO: Well, recently, the new winds have started blowing to me. My company, my business, has been growing.

WENDERS: Thinking about the film that we did together, Notebook on Cities and Clothes: Do you realize that it's almost a quarter of a century old now? Can you imagine? We were both young men when we made that movie. So many things have happened to you since then—and over the last 10 years, especially.

YAMAMOTO: Yes, yes. But at the same time, I feel like I have become a living fossil in the fashion world. Without even noticing it, in my own collection I have moved away from the street style. I was on a Japanese designers' pedestal—considered a maestro. My design was getting closer to a couturier's work, and I felt like I was missing something. But I always want to have a new challenge involved. I need to put myself to the test, and if I make mistakes, it doesn't matter. What matters to me, instead, is making my dreams come true and putting them on display. At a certain point, I stopped seeing my clothing worn by people on the streets . . . It seemed like they were being treated as museum items.

WENDERS: Well, you've been designing for how long now?

YAMAMOTO: Around 50 years. I started working in Tokyo about 40 years ago, and I've been showing in Paris for 32 years.

WENDERS: So you are not a fossil, you are a dinosaur. [Yamamoto laughs] But a dinosaur that is in good shape.

YAMAMOTO: Well, for my next men's show, you will have to walk on the stage.

WENDERS: Okay, just give me a call. I'm nice and thin right now, but don't wait too long, because I'm going to gain weight again.

YAMAMOTO: [laughs] I'm planning to make a very strange fashion show right now in Berlin.

WENDERS: What is going to be so strange about it?

YAMAMOTO: I'm going to do a show by using my archives—my old work.

WENDERS: I think the last time we saw each other was at your beautiful exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum a couple of years ago. You showed some things from your archives there, too.

YAMAMOTO: The Victoria and Albert was an exhibition, though—a retrospective. But I've never done an archive show before.

WENDERS: You've been collaborating with Adidas on Y-3 for 10 years now.

YAMAMOTO: Yes, it's 10 years already that I've been doing that.

WENDERS: I remember how excited I was when that started—I still have some beautiful vintage shoes from the first or second year. How did working on that develop?

YAMAMOTO: It's been growing every year. We now have a whole team of five or six people who are involved in it. They all work with me on Y-3. It all happened spontaneously. In the beginning we just wanted to borrow some ‘three stripes' trainers from Adidas for my Fall-Winter 2000-01 show. In Japan, the three stripes were everywhere, and the young crowd did not take them off even when it was time to go to bed. So I decided to ring up Adidas and ask them. I was sure that they would refuse and was pleasantly surprised when they said yes. Then we started discussing with their designers how the sportswear of the future would look and decided that we would need high-tech fabrics, bright colors, and fashionable silhouettes—in short, everything the full-price prêt-à-porter collections had. So that's how Y-3 came about. For Y-3, I am creating something that has never before existed in the world . . . It developed naturally and grew the way children develop and grow. More things were added—accessories, hats, bicycles, soccer balls—but the original idea has not changed. You have to treat Y-3 like it is an independent human—in that way, the brand already has its own character. The sports world and its technology seek practicality and functionality, attempting to reduce excess, while fashion is seeking the opposite. So together with Adidas, we created something that did not exist before—and completely projected the future. Adidas is a very personal flintstone to me. It has enriched my creative life. It's an exchange between different cultures, different ideas, and most of all, it is teamwork. Japanese and German people are intelligent sorts—our working rhythm is the same. So Adidas and I, we just like each other. So what are you doing right now?

WENDERS: I've been working on this documentary about my favorite photographer, Sebastião Salgado. He and I have been discussing something that I wanted to ask you about. If you're working as a filmmaker, a writer, an artist, or in any creative field, as you become older, you often realize that, in a strange way, you always do the same movie, write the same novel, make the same painting. There is a language to your work that you can't cast aside—it's in you and it's who you are. Do you feel like that's true for you in any way? Do you feel like you're designing the same clothes over and over? Or do you feel like you can still totally reinvent what you do?

YAMAMOTO: I feel like I'm doing the same thing every year. In my main line, there are boundaries and rules, whereas in designing for Y-3, I am more free. I can work without any taboos. But then there is also a schedule to fashion—the deadline is always set. So maybe the fashion business is a good business for me in that way because I'm basically lazy, man.

WENDERS: Well, for a lazy man you are the worst workaholic I know. Do you at least take some days off after a show?

YAMAMOTO: I have no imagination about holidays, vacations, or retiring life. I can't imagine about those things.

WENDERS: I am the same way. Donata [Wenders's wife] tries to convince me that we should have a holiday, but I don't know how to do it. It's a difficult concept for me—to go somewhere and not do anything. Don't you think it's a strange idea, the holiday? To travel somewhere in order to—

YAMAMOTO: Not to do something. Yes, it's very difficult for me, too . . . But when you describe it the way you just did, I like it. [both laugh]

WENDERS: Do you still play guitar?

YAMAMOTO: Not anymore. I no longer have emotion for playing guitar or making music. If I do it again, then maybe the title of the song I play will be "Goodbye."

WENDERS: Let me know if you change your mind, because I loved your music. I wish I could still play the saxophone but I've lost the habit.

YAMAMOTO: The saxophone?

WENDERS: Yes, I used to play the saxophone. But it's been too long since I've played, and if you don't keep it up, then it's probably the same as what happens with your fingers and playing guitar—your mouth doesn't have the feeling for it anymore.

YAMAMOTO: Yes. You have to be dedicated. I also don't have much time now because Keiko and I recently started living with a baby dog, which is a big responsibility. I cannot go out at night, because none of the coffee shops or restaurants accept animals in Japan. So when do you finish the film?

WENDERS: I'm still working on it, so hopefully we will finish this spring. I just shot with Salgado in Paris, and now we're going to Brazil in a couple of days, to his hometown to shoot with him there. He's a beautiful man and he does fantastic photography. But Donata and I might be in Tokyo later, in the next few months, so maybe we can see then if I cannot beat you at least once in pool. Maybe you will give me a chance.

YAMAMOTO: Oh, I'm sure you will lose again. [laughs]

WENDERS: I'm already intimidated—I will have to practice. Are you still fighting? Are you still doing martial arts?

YAMAMOTO: Not really. The best moments in my life recently are just before going to bed. Those are my happiest moments.

WENDERS: So your black belt is no longer active?

YAMAMOTO: I'm not sure. But if a crazy man wanted to have a street fight with me, I still might be able to beat him.


WIM WENDERS IS AN ACADEMY AWARD-NOMINATED GERMAN FILMMAKER AND PHOTOGRAPHER.


notebook on cities and clothes is well worth a watch if you haven't seen it
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Re: magazines

Postby germinal » Fri Sep 20, 2013 5:28 pm

oyster mag

Interview: Rick Owens and Michèle Lamy
From Oyster #103's BFFs series.

Rick Owens and his wife Michèle Lamy (who we previsouly interviewed for Oyster #93) call themselves The Huns, but their brand of world domination seems more like a happy mistake than anything so sinister as the nickname suggests. Rick is the more subdued of the two, his clothes fittingly sober — monochromatic, sexless and futuristic. Michèle, on the other hand, exudes fun. She laughs and gesticulates constantly while talking, and her silver teeth and stacked-on jewellery flash in the sun like strobe lights. I met with them one afternoon at their showroom in Paris' Le Marais.

[Scene: Inside Rick’s expansive white showroom on Rue Charlot (according to Rick, it used to be the showroom for Chloé). Rick is pacing up and down the racks of clothes, checking details on the garments here and there. Michèle hobbles into the room in ridiculously tall heel-less platforms.]

Rick Owens: I need to smoke.
Zac Bayly: Oh my God — I need a smoke too.
Rick: I'll meet you outside. I've got to get my ChapStick.
[Rick disappears into another room. Michèle and Zac leave the building and make their way across the cobblestones toward a very French-looking round, white table in the courtyard. Michèle is clearly struggling to walk in her shoes, so when Rick arrives he takes her arm and helps her to the table. Everyone sits down, and Rick and Zac light up cigarettes.]
Rick: Oh honey — I don't know how you do it.
Michèle: It's only on this cobblestone that I've got to be careful. [To Zac] I'm not a smoker anymore.

How long did you smoke for?
Michèle: Oh, like, 50 years.

50 years! You don’t look like you’ve smoked for… Do you mind if I ask how old you are?
Michèle: You count. I started smoking at ten, so…
Rick: [To Zac] What happened to your arm?

I was in Croatia and partied too hard. I slipped on the rocks by the sea.
Michèle: [Laughs]
Rick: That’s dramatic. Was that the end of the evening for you?

No, but I had a big lip for a week, like Lana Del Rey.
Rick: Oh dear…

I loved it! I wish my lip still looked that big.
Michèle: I can see it still. That’s good. It's a nice sore.
Rick: In Croatia, do all of the islands have gay nude beaches?

Pretty much [blushes and laughs]. Your showroom is huge, by the way.
Rick: I know! [To Michèle] How did we ever manage it? It's huge!
Michèle: Yes, but it's too big. We can't fill the space.
Rick: Well, let's do another collection.
Michèle: Exactly. That's what I was going to tell you — we can do another collection.

I was here when you thought of that. You should call it ‘Zac’.
Michèle: Yeah?
Rick: I don’t think we will. Anyway, this is our first season in this space. We had another space that was kind of big last season that was nice, but it was a little less nice than this.

How long ago did you start the label?
Rick: It was about eleven years ago, maybe twelve.

What were you guys doing before that?
Rick: Michèle had a restaurant and I was across the street in my studio.
Michèle: I had a clothing company before.
Rick: [To Michèle] It's interesting that you’re becoming as much a part of the public image of the company as I am.
Rick: Before we moved to Paris we had never worked together. Michèle always had her restaurant and I did the clothes, and we met up at the end of the night and talked about what we did. When we moved here Michèle had become kind of… You'd become exhausted by the restaurant, right?
Michèle: Yeah. That's another story.
Rick: You were tired of it. I hadn’t really planned on moving here; Michèle was the one that suggested it. I go, "Sure, we could move to Europe. Why not? But do you wanna do that?" And she was like, "Yeah, let’s do it. We'll go on holiday and see how it goes." She packed a little extra for the trip, I noticed, and I remember it was very significant because she never packs very much. [To Michèle] I felt like it meant that you were never going back to LA. You said, "Sure I am" — but she never did go back.
Michèle: I thought we were only going to go to Europe for six months. I love not knowing what's going to happen. As soon as we got here it seemed it was meant to be. I found a place, like, in two weeks.

Zac: What did you do once you arrived in Paris?
Rick: I was working as Artistic Director at [French fur company] Revillon, and Michèle became very involved in that. That became sort of her thing. And then when we started doing our furniture line, which was meant to be a one-time thing, she took an interest in that and started developing that side of the business. It's kind of become like a village — it's a collaboration between all these different artisans, and that's not my area of expertise.

Michèle is the people person.
Rick: Right. Michèle is a people person and I'm so not a people person, so it just naturally fell into place because that was where she was happiest, and that was kind of something that I couldn't do. I can be in a factory and bark at people and do patterns and stuff, but I can't seduce results out of temperamental artisans. I can't! I don’t have the patience for that! She loves it, though.
Michèle: The talent that Rick has in developing things… I don't have that. I can work with the artisans, though, and make sure their work is featured in the right places — the right galleries.
Rick: Even in LA, we were always making our own environment, so doing the furniture was a natural progression for us. We've been building a whole world, from fashion to interiors.
Michèle: We’ve been building a big nest.
Rick: When I'm doing the clothes, though, I'm not open about it. I don’t share. It's hard for me to stay focused, so I have to stay closed off. With the clothes, I can't talk about that side of things with anybody. [To Zac] How did you come to Paris?

By train.
Rick: And when do you go back?

I go back to London tomorrow. That gives me a week to clean six months of dirty dishes and say goodbye to my London life.
Michèle: Oh, you are going to make me cry!
Rick: Have you cried?

I did the other day — I’m going to miss London!
Michèle: It's so nice, crying.
Rick: I almost cried the other day listening to ‘Vogue’ by Madonna.

Why?
Rick: But it's just a great song [everyone laughs]. I was at the gym. It's such a nostalgic song, but also it's like the solution to all the world's problems, you know? Just get up and vogue! It doesn't matter if you're black or white or a boy or a girl — life's a ball. It was a very profound moment.


http://oystermag.com/interview-rick-owe ... ch-le-lamy
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Re: magazines

Postby can- » Fri Sep 20, 2013 6:58 pm

the image of rick on a bench crying while vogue plays is fuckin fantastic

Spoiler:
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Re: magazines

Postby smiles » Sat Sep 21, 2013 5:36 am

thinking about picking up some copies of LAW magazine.

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got the latest i-D magazine. it's all about "the streets" both physical and digital.
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Re: magazines

Postby bels » Sat Sep 21, 2013 8:24 am

I hate interviews where the interviewer tries to insert themselves into the interview
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Re: magazines

Postby sknss » Sat Sep 21, 2013 8:46 am

VICE does that all the time, it's awful. they write about fun topics but it's always ruined by that
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Re: magazines

Postby Stingray Sam » Sat Sep 21, 2013 1:45 pm

Has any one read the travel almanac? It sounds like an interesting magazine
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Re: magazines

Postby charybdis » Sat Sep 21, 2013 11:57 pm

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Photos from rag and bone from the New Yorker.

http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/p ... ide_ss_0=4

Apparently there was a style issue but it's such a looong walk to the mailbox.
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Re: magazines

Postby germinal » Sun Oct 06, 2013 2:46 pm

i bought apartamento issue #11 the other day

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Apartamento wrote:Featuring: François Halard, Michael Stipe, Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Bob Gill, Anton Henning, Marlene Marino, Jeff Rian, Tony Cederteg, Maurice Scheltens & Liesbeth Abbenes, Adrià Cañameras, Ricardo Bofill, Elfie Semotan, Tenko Nakajima, Michael Smith, Santi Caleca, Dike Blair, Lovis Caputo, Lars Müller, Alexander Schärer, Henry Roy, Jeremy Liebman

With a selection of proverbs illustrated by Mirko Borsche & Gian Gisiger and a comic by Andy Rementer & Margherita Urbani


http://www.apartamentomagazine.com/current.php

it was expensive for a maga\ine but it's 250-odd pages, and the interviews i've read so far have been really interesting and insightful, and it's brimming with great phtos &c
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Re: magazines

Postby Syeknom » Sun Oct 06, 2013 3:15 pm

That looks really interesting! Great painting on the cover.

I haven't bought a magazine since my subscription to The Wire ended, perhaps I should see what's out there.
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Re: magazines

Postby ramseames » Sun Oct 06, 2013 5:33 pm

apartamento is good, I've been a subscriber for a little while now.
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Re: magazines

Postby bels » Mon Oct 07, 2013 2:23 pm

Is there a magazine like Paris Review that only has poetry?

Ain't nobody got time to read Paris Review
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Re: magazines

Postby germinal » Wed Nov 13, 2013 8:58 pm

interview mag

http://www.interviewmagazine.com/fashio ... -lemaire#_

CHRISTOPHE LEMAIRE
By REBECCA VOIGHT
Photography CÉDRIC BUCHET

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Just before the grand depart, France's month-long August summer break, Christophe Lemaire, the designer of Hermès womenswear, is on the rooftop of a multilevel garage in Paris. This one provides a rare 360-degree view of the city's many slate-gray rooftops. It's an appropriately high-altitude place to photograph his Hermès woman, whose position in matters of style appears blissfully above the fray. It has been a jam-packed year for Lemaire, who designs his own eponymous lines for men and women in addition to his collections for Hermès, where in his fifth season for the house, he has achieved a kind of breakthrough, a wardrobe of clothes that blends its rich heritage with an understated, uniquely Gallic mode of chic. This restrained quality is, in fact, his signature, a wearable simplicity that transcends trend, a kind of fashion that pulls from everyday style, reinventing the classics.

The nephew of Robert Caillé (who published French Vogue in its Francine Crescent days), the French-born Lemaire, now 48, spent his childhood surrounded by elegant women. Prior to joining Hermès, he already had a well-established reputation as a designer in fashion circles, albeit one removed from the glamorous social swirl inhabited by some of his contemporaries. A two-time winner of France's ANDAM prize, he interned at Yves Saint Laurent and Thierry Mugler in the early '80s before assisting Christian Lacroix. In 1991, at the age of 25, he launched his namesake line, and in 2000, he was brought on by Lacoste to reinvigorate the sportswear brand. Lemaire's coronation as the new design head of Hermès in 2010 was regarded as a bit of a surprise within the industry—especially given the insouciant glitz of his predecessor, Jean Paul Gaultier. But handpicked by Hermès artistic director Pierre-Alexis Dumas—a descendant of Hermès founder Thierry Hermès—the subdued Lemaire has seemed more than in his element.

Hermès has always been more about clothes that people can live in than fashion fantasy, as evidenced by its beginnings in 1837 as a purveyor of equestrian wares. Lemaire elegantly tapped into this more functional element of the brand's history for his fall 2013 show, staged in the upstairs library of one of Paris's most elite schools, the Lycée Henri IV, where the bookish surroundings were an apt setting for his crisp button-ups, leather separates, and menswear-influenced outerwear. I spoke with him in Paris.


REBECCA VOIGHT: You've been all over the place, from your first internship at Thierry Mugler to Yves Saint Laurent, to the launch of your own brand, to a stint in Japan, to Lacoste, and now Hermès. What's the common denominator?

CHRISTOPHE LEMAIRE: It's the idea of making daily life more beautiful and finding poetry in reality. As a child, I developed this fascination for everything that touches decoration, environment, quality of life, and clothing. Little by little, I began to make my mark. I can be quick in daily life, but deep down it has taken me a long time to mature, define my vision, and acquire the self-confidence to express it. I had a kind of imposter complex when I was younger. I didn't feel comfortable with how the fashion system works. I wasn't at ease with the nonstop spectacle of it. I've always loved designing clothes and had a passionate interest in style, but in a more intimate, not so superficial way.

VOIGHT: You interned at Yves Saint Laurent. What led you there?

LEMAIRE: I arrived at the end of Saint Laurent's more experimental period, but I was already completely immersed in his style because my mother and grandmother wore Saint Laurent. My grandmother was such an elegant woman. When I was growing up, I spent all of my vacations with her in the south of France, and it was funny because at the end of her life, she began to wear Alaïa. My uncle [Robert Caillé] was the publisher of French Vogue in the 1970s, when the magazine was full of Guy Bourdin's photos. My uncle was very social, and Helmut Newton wrote about him in his biography. But I wasn't obsessed about becoming a fashion designer back then. Looking back, I can see that I was just very precise about the kinds of clothes I wanted to wear.

VOIGHT: What were you wearing at the time?

LEMAIRE: Fashion and music were very close in '79. I was listening to the Specials and was into the 2-Tone movement. I'd go to Marché aux Puces St-Ouen de Clignancourt [Paris flea market], where there was just one stand that sold old Levi's Sta-Prest pants. I wore Catalina blousons and creepers. As a teenager, I was into new wave and ska, Siouxsie and the Banshees, and Joy Division. Then Rei Kawakubo and Yohji Yamamoto arrived to show in Paris, and I was completely into that, so I got into fashion.

VOIGHT: After working at Saint Laurent, you landed as an assistant for Christian Lacroix.

LEMAIRE: It all happened so quickly. I started working for Christian in '86, when he was designing for Jean Patou. I arrived just before he launched his couture house with Bernard Arnault. One morning, I was at rue Saint-Florentin chez Patou, and Christian and Jean-Jacques Picart weren't there, but they called to say they were launching the house. There was a lot of buzz. The next thing I knew, I was on my way to New York to do a show and then on to Los Angeles. I remember accompanying the clothes and dealing with customs at JFK. I was 21 and in charge of a team of American dressers backstage for the New York show. There was something insouciant and easy-going about fashion in the late 1980s, before the pressure of big business and media took hold.

VOIGHT: Then you launched your own eponymous line when you were in your mid-20s. What convinced you to do that?

LEMAIRE: I was very impatient. I jumped into the water before I knew how to swim. It was an independent brand, so I had a business with a team of 15 people to manage, but I was also the designer. I wasn't prepared and so I stopped in 2000, took a break, and relaunched in 2006.

VOIGHT: There was a point in your career when you seemed to have disappeared to Japan. You were doing a lot of DJ'ing and then you were gone. What did you find there?

LEMAIRE: I had a love affair with Japan. I still have it. Japan was a cultural shock for me when I visited for the first time, in '95. I was invited by my distributor. My collection was successful right away there—unlike in France, where I was not considered conceptual enough at the time. But I had a French side that caught on right away in Japan. I remember we did a show in one of those hyperchic, '60s Blow-Up-style striptease clubs that you can only find in Tokyo. The girls were topless, but they were all very beautiful and it was not vulgar. I remember asking myself, "What is going on in this country?" It felt like being in London in '67, only it was Japan. There was something about Japanese culture that got me right away—the sensitivity, subtlety, refinement, sophistication, attention to detail, and the attention they devote to being in the moment.

VOIGHT: Lacoste was one of the first French sportswear brands to get an haute fashion makeover, and they picked you to do it. Taking on the polo shirt must have come as quite a change for a designer who cut his style teeth at Yves Saint Laurent and Lacroix.

LEMAIRE: Yeah, and that's what I liked about it. I love the Lacoste story, the brand's values, the elegant sport style, the democratic side. Perhaps it was a bit naive to think I could just walk in and bring style and quality to a brand that's so accessible.

VOIGHT: After that, Lacoste suddenly looked more chic than mass.

LEMAIRE: Yes. I was inspired by Suzanne Lenglen and the court photos by Jacques-Henri Lartigue. We did some great shows, and it was an exciting change to have girls smiling and looking healthy on the runway. We took this very French idea of chic sport to New York. And strangely enough, I have found the same spirit at Hermès.

VOIGHT: So in 2010, after a decade, you left Lacoste in a very good position, and Hermès came knocking at your door. Were you surprised?

LEMAIRE: I had old memories about Hermès from my childhood. When I worked for Patou, I would pass by the Hermès windows all the time. They were elegant and rich, and that was the first thing that made me think it was a marvelous brand

VOIGHT: Hermès didn't need a remake, though. It seems like it was more about fusing your style to the brand. What was it like at the start?

LEMAIRE: The first feeling I had when Pierre-Alexis [Dumas] contacted me was a sense of inevitability, but I was also a bit surprised that he thought of me. It seemed quite smart of them to have identified me. But there were a lot of sleepless nights. I didn't feel like becoming part of another system, but we had the same values and understood each other, so right from the start there was a lot of enthusiasm and confidence. It felt like joining a family, and that's quite seductive.

VOIGHT: It took you a while to find your groove.

LEMAIRE: There's nothing worse for a designer than feeling skepticism, incomprehension, or a sense of wait and see, but at Hermès there's a great sense of dialogue and details. They have a way of putting you at ease. You get the impression that everyone is working in the same direction to do things right, but there's also a sense of freedom and fantasy that goes back to Jean-Louis Dumas [Pierre-Alexis's father] and before that. You can see it in the archives, there's an elegance and lightness.

VOIGHT: The fall 2013/14 collection you presented last March felt like a breakthrough. What clicked for you this time?

LEMAIRE: More than just a fashion show, we wanted it to be a Hermès moment. Hermès isn't about fantasy, but at the same time, it's about an idealized femininity. I think the epitome of elegance is when you see a man or a woman on a street corner, on the bus, or on vacation, and you ask yourself, "Who is that?" We wanted something classic, timeless, and chic, but also erotic and strange.

VOIGHT: Did you feel like you achieved that?

LEMAIRE: We worked on details. Sometimes the only accessory would be a ring, like it was the girl's own. And we perfumed the girls with Hermès's Poivre Samarcande. I'm not sure the audience noticed that because it was subtle, but the girls knew it, and that made the difference. The styling itself was pretty straightforward, but we spent a lot of time on the casting and the fittings to find the right outfit for the right girl. Then we said to them, "Don't be a model tonight, be a woman. You're just passing through this beautiful place and you're going to meet your lover."

VOIGHT: So Hermès doesn't have to shout?

LEMAIRE: It's about being useful, practical, and of the highest quality more than making a big visual statement. We're living in an image-oriented pop culture, but I've never been very at ease with that.

VOIGHT: At this point in your career, do you still feel like the preparation for each season is a challenge?

LEMAIRE: Yes, but it's good and I'm not thinking too much about it. There's no time. For example, today was the first day I had to spend a few hours at the Musée d'Orsay. I spent an entire hour in the Odilon Redon room. He's one of my favorite artists. He once said something like, "You can't explain what you do because you don't know yourself." There's a layer of references that has built up over the years and now it's almost instinctive. It's a kind of mysterious breeding ground, and I like it like that way.

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Re: magazines

Postby bels » Thu Nov 14, 2013 2:42 pm

Hermès has always been more about clothes that people can live in than fashion fantasy, as evidenced by its beginnings in 1837 as a purveyor of equestrian wares


What? Isn't hermes the one that sells dillion pound leather belts? Get out of here with this foolishness.
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Re: magazines

Postby sknss » Tue Dec 03, 2013 6:37 am

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Awesome Courrèges editorial by Peter Knapp for ELLE. This was taken in 1965...
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Re: magazines

Postby sknss » Thu Feb 20, 2014 10:36 am

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Re: magazines

Postby maj » Fri May 09, 2014 7:42 am

Christopher Shannon for MAN magazine

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Re: magazines

Postby charybdis » Mon May 19, 2014 5:54 pm

They reprinted the old STREET Margiela issues as a single omnibus. Martin Margiela himself did the photos/layout and apparently it was a bit of a collector's item.

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Here's a video of someone flipping through the pages.

(Also, do we have a Margiela thread? I can't believe we don't, but I dunno what weird thing it might be named.)

@forestfeet this thread might help you find more cool fashion magazines
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Re: magazines

Postby charybdis » Sun May 25, 2014 2:30 pm

Recalibrating my magazine subscriptions because subsubbing from the New Yorker left a big hole in my heart but took away 90% of my weekly feeling of guilt. Anyway, been reading/looking into some fashion magazines because I love the magazine medium.

Recently read the last issue of F de C reader and the interviews were super interesting. I especially recommend the interview with the founder of STREET magazine.

(Although that one Chinese designer has her head so far up his ass whenever she tries to talk about American culture versus Chinese culture.)

(Her clothes are really fucking cool though.)

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The magazine has a super intentionally lo fi jizz and it's ten bucks so worth picking up IMO. Their interview style is pretty casual and they manage to draw out a lot of really interesting responses (including a claim that Undercover was partially funded by the Yakuza in the beginning) and the photos are pretty unusual. (The mini novella included is pretty badly Tao Lin-like though.)

Anyone read A Magazine curated by? It looks really interesting.

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Also, stumbled onto this interview with Helmut Lang in Dapper Dan that I thought was kind of cool. He talks about his post-fashion art endeavors.
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Re: magazines

Postby germinal » Sun Jul 20, 2014 1:51 pm

It was the era of very, very dark clubs… by Willy Vanderperre;
styling by Olivier Rizzo;

System magazine, spring/summer 2014.

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