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Postby can- » Sat Aug 31, 2013 1:36 pm

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this is the thread for all things futuristic, technical, grunge-dystopian.

required reading for this course:
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby bels » Sat Aug 31, 2013 1:48 pm

therosenrot is the most cyberpunk version I've ever known.
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby can- » Sat Aug 31, 2013 2:02 pm

final home
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more under the spoiler
Spoiler:
x g shock
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beautiful flight vest
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SEED jacket
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby germinal » Wed Sep 04, 2013 12:00 pm

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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby starfox64 » Wed Sep 04, 2013 12:19 pm

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I feel like Neuromancer is the real cyberpunk bible, just because it takes itself so much more seriously than Snow Crash.
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby starfox64 » Wed Sep 04, 2013 10:34 pm

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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby can- » Wed Sep 04, 2013 11:42 pm

is that the aitor para jacket?

i would pay just to handle aitor gear. missed his bags when they were briefly at atelier and i don't think DSM NY will be open by the time this collection comes and goes. i've heard his construction barely resembles anything else
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby can- » Thu Sep 05, 2013 12:29 am

Ralph Lauren Black Label
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby starfox64 » Thu Sep 05, 2013 3:06 am

since when did black label put out stuff like that?

yeah its aitor. i'd love to fuck around with that stuff, but its like $5k.
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby germinal » Thu Sep 05, 2013 7:45 am

The Aitor Throup stuff i've handled is unbelievable. Feels as if you really could survive the apocalypse whilst wearing it. The patterning is done to perfection - there's literally no seam allowances, it's sewn edge-to-edge. The bonded rubber material he has developed is unlike anything i've handled before; it flexes and moves so bizarrely, it feels like armour, or as if it's caked in goo from some radioactive swamp. Your body adjusts to fit the clothes rather than the other way round. The prices are completely understandable (although still unpalatable) when you've seen the clothes - they could never be mass-produced, you can feel the hours of hard work aitor and co have put into realising these pieces.
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby can- » Thu Sep 05, 2013 2:13 pm

i can't even imagine what it means that it's sewn edge to edge lol. does anyone know where it's manufactured?

re: RLBL- i heard from a friend who's working for ralph in the city that they are dropping black label and merging it with purple label. the two have always had really nebulous identities to me altho they are always recognizably Ralph. i've become really fond of the Ralph man in the last year.

Black Label Flight Jacket

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Stone island x Diemme monkey boots

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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby bels » Thu Sep 05, 2013 5:13 pm

http://www.vogue.co.uk/fashion/autumn-w ... ery/897905

I guess edge to edge is like... the way you sew a wound back together? Can zoom in on some of those photos to look at the seams.

(When you were a kid did you ever imagine you'd zoom in on a photo to look at a seam?)
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby bels » Thu Sep 05, 2013 5:23 pm

from another of my dormant tumblrs

Teenagers with hoodies and AK47s lighting fires in shopfronts vacated by liquidised corporations. The Mogadishu of the Midlands. Quarantined airport, armoured limousine motorcade. Regret. Regret. Regret. IP adress rather than real address. Tungsten Carbide. Neural Net. Undercrypted. I am watching from the future. Analogue changes are permanent. Ancestor worship. Digital pagan. Amateur satanist. A small club of simulacra enthusiasts. Contact form. Auto reply


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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby germinal » Thu Sep 05, 2013 7:07 pm

as far as i know all aitor stuff is made by him and his team in his studio in london, ccp style. doubt it could be done by immigrant workers in italy or wherever, considering that the techniques and materials used are the result of the best part of a decade of research.

do cyberpunks still listen to techno or do they listen to post rock or to idm? or genres unknown
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby can- » Thu Sep 05, 2013 9:28 pm

While out and about, cyberpunks listen to Burial

While programming from their converted one room studio (looks more like a cockpit), they listen to Ryoji Ikeda

A cyberpunk makes love to his old woman to James Blake

Kick it oldschool with New Order while geocaching
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby can- » Thu Sep 05, 2013 9:29 pm

how many techninjas can you spot in this image?

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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby can- » Thu Sep 05, 2013 10:27 pm

balenciaga

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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby bels » Fri Sep 06, 2013 4:54 am

I feel like Cyberpunks must be the most content subcultures ever. Has any other sub culture got the future they wanted? Punks, hippies, goths all wanted a type of world that they never got and look like anachronisms because of it. Cyberpunks live in a cyberpunk world (right now at least)

Big William Gibson interview here:

http://www.theparisreview.org/interview ... iam-gibson
William Gibson, The Art of Fiction No. 211
Interviewed by David Wallace-Wells
Get more interviews like this—plus fiction, poetry, art, and more—and subscribe to The Paris Review
today!
Vancouver, British Columbia, sits just on the far side of the American border, a green-glass model city set
in the dish of the North Shore Mountains, which enclose the city and support, most days, a thick canopy of
fog. There are periods in the year when it’ll rain for forty days, William Gibson tells me one mucky day there
this winter, and when visibility drops so low you can’t see what’s coming at you from the nearest street
corner. But large parts of Vancouver are traversed by trolley cars, and on clear nights you can gaze up at the
wide expanse of Pacific sky through the haphazard grid of their electric wires.
Gibson came to Vancouver in 1972, a twenty-four-year-old orphan who’d spent the past half-decade
trawling the counterculture in fake canada on his wandering way from small-town southern Virginia. He had
never been to the Far East, which would yield so much of the junk-heap casino texture of his early fiction. He
hadn’t been to college and didn’t yet intend to go. He hadn’t yet heard of the Internet, or even its
predecessors arpanet and Telenet. He thought he might become a film-cell animator. He hadn’t yet written
any science fiction—he hadn’t read any science fiction since adolescence, having discarded the stuff more or
less completely at fourteen, just, he says, as its publishers intended.
Today, Gibson is lanky and somewhat shy, avuncular and slow to speak—more what you would expect
from the lapsed science-fiction enthusiast he was in 1972 than the genre-vanquishing hero he has become
since the publication of his first novel, the hallucinatory hacker thriller Neuromancer, in 1984. Gibson resists
being called a visionary, yet his nine novels constitute as subtle and clarifying a meditation on the
transformation of culture by technology as has been written since the beginning of what we now know to call
the information age. Neuromancer, famously, gave us the term cyberspace and the vision of the Internet as a
lawless, spellbinding realm. And, with its two sequels, Count Zero (1986) and Mona Lisa Overdrive (1988), it
helped establish the cultural figure of the computer hacker as cowboy hero. In his Bridge series—Virtual
Light (1993), Idoru (1996), and All Tomorrow’s Parties (1999), each of which unfolds in a Bay Bridge
shantytown improvised after a devastating Pacific earthquake transforms much of San Francisco—he
planted potted futures of celebrity journalism, reality television, and nanotechnology, each prescient and
persuasive and altogether weird.
Neuromancer and its two sequels were set in distant decades and contrived to dazzle the reader with
strangeness, but the Bridge novels are set in the near future—so near they read like alternate history, Gibson
says, with evident pride. With his next books, he began to write about the present-day, or more precisely, the
recent past: each of the three novels in the series is set in the year before it was written. He started with
September 11, 2001.
Pattern Recognition was the first of that series. It has been called “an eerie vision of our time” by The New
Yorker, “one of the first authentic and vital novels of the twenty-first century,” by The Washington Post Book
World, and, by The Economist, “probably the best exploration yet of the function and power of product
branding and advertising in the age of globalization.” The Pattern Recognition books are also the first since
Mona Lisa Overdrive in which Gibson’s characters speak of cyberspace, and they speak of it elegiacally. “I
saw it go from the yellow legal pad to the Oxford English Dictionary,” he tells me. “But cyberspace is
everywhere now, having everted and colonized the world. It starts to sound kind of ridiculous to speak ofcyberspace as being somewhere else.”
You can tell the term still holds some magic for him, perhaps even more so now that it is passing into
obsolescence. The opposite is true for cyberpunk, a neologism that haunts him to this day. On a short walk to
lunch one afternoon, from the two-story mock-Tudor house where he lives with his wife, Deborah, he
complained about a recent visit from a British journalist, who came to Vancouver searching for “Mr.
Cyberpunk” and was disappointed to find him ensconced in a pleasantly quiet suburban patch of central
Vancouver. Mr. Cyberpunk seemed wounded by having his work pigeonholed, but equally so by the insult to
his home, which is quite comfortable, and his neighborhood, which is, too. “We like it quiet,” he explained.
—David Wallace-Wells
INTERVIEWER
What’s wrong with cyberpunk?
GIBSON
A snappy label and a manifesto would have been two of the very last things on my own career want list.
That label enabled mainstream science fiction to safely assimilate our dissident influence, such as it was.
Cyberpunk could then be embraced and given prizes and patted on the head, and genre science fiction could
continue unchanged.
INTERVIEWER
What was that dissident influence? What were you trying to do?
GIBSON
I didn’t have a manifesto. I had some discontent. It seemed to me that midcentury mainstream American
science fiction had often been triumphalist and militaristic, a sort of folk propaganda for American
exceptionalism. I was tired of America-as-the-future, the world as a white monoculture, the protagonist as a
good guy from the middle class or above. I wanted there to be more elbow room. I wanted to make room for
antiheroes.
I also wanted science fiction to be more naturalistic. There had been a poverty of description in much of it.
The technology depicted was so slick and clean that it was practically invisible. What would any given SF
favorite look like if we could crank up the resolution? As it was then, much of it was like video games before
the invention of fractal dirt. I wanted to see dirt in the corners.
INTERVIEWER
How do you begin a novel?
GIBSON
I have to write an opening sentence. I think with one exception I’ve never changed an opening sentence
after a book was completed.
INTERVIEWER
You won’t have planned beyond that one sentence?
GIBSON
No. I don’t begin a novel with a shopping list—the novel becomes my shopping list as I write it. It’s likethat joke about the violin maker who was asked how he made a violin and answered that he started with a
piece of wood and removed everything that wasn’t a violin. That’s what I do when I’m writing a novel, except
somehow I’m simultaneously generating the wood as I’m carving it.
E. M. Forster’s idea has always stuck with me—that a writer who’s fully in control of the characters hasn’t
even started to do the work. I’ve never had any direct fictional input, that I know of, from dreams, but when
I’m working optimally I’m in the equivalent of an ongoing lucid dream. That gives me my story, but it also
leaves me devoid of much theoretical or philosophical rationale for why the story winds up as it does on the
page. The sort of narratives I don’t trust, as a reader, smell of homework.
INTERVIEWER
Do you take notes?
GIBSON
I take the position that if I can forget it, it couldn’t have been very good.
But in the course of a given book, I sometimes get to a point where the narrative flow overwhelms the
speed at which I can compose. So I’ll sometimes stop and make cryptic notes that are useless by the time I
get back to them. Underlined three times, with no context—“Have they been too big a deal?”
INTERVIEWER
What is your writing schedule like?
GIBSON
When I’m writing a book I get up at seven. I check my e-mail and do Internet ablutions, as we do these
days. I have a cup of coffee. Three days a week, I go to Pilates and am back by ten or eleven. Then I sit down
and try to write. If absolutely nothing is happening, I’ll give myself permission to mow the lawn. But,
generally, just sitting down and really trying is enough to get it started. I break for lunch, come back, and do
it some more. And then, usually, a nap. Naps are essential to my process. Not dreams, but that state adjacent
to sleep, the mind on waking.
INTERVIEWER
And your schedule is steady the whole way through?
GIBSON
As I move through the book it becomes more demanding. At the beginning, I have a five-day workweek,
and each day is roughly ten to five, with a break for lunch and a nap. At the very end, it’s a seven-day week,
and it could be a twelve-hour day.
Toward the end of a book, the state of composition feels like a complex, chemically altered state that will
go away if I don’t continue to give it what it needs. What it needs is simply to write all the time. Downtime
other than simply sleeping becomes problematic. I’m always glad to see the back of that.
INTERVIEWER
Do you revise?
GIBSON
Every day, when I sit down with the manuscript, I start at page one and go through the whole thing,
revising freely.INTERVIEWER
You revise the whole manuscript every day?
GIBSON
I do, though that might consist of only a few small changes. I’ve done that since my earliest attempts at
short stories. It would be really frustrating for me not to be able to do that. I would feel as though I were
flying blind.
The beginnings of my books are rewritten many times. The endings are only a draft or three, and then
they’re done. But I can scan the manuscript very quickly, much more quickly than I could ever read anyone
else’s prose.
INTERVIEWER
Does your assessment of the work change, day by day?
GIBSON
If it were absolutely steady I don’t think it could be really good judgment. I think revision is hugely
underrated. It is very seldom recognized as a place where the higher creativity can live, or where it can
manifest. I think it was Yeats who said that literary revision was the only place in life where a man could
truly improve himself.
INTERVIEWER
How much do you write in a typical day?
GIBSON
I don’t know. I used to make printouts at every stage, just to be comforted by the physical fact of the pile of
manuscript. It was seldom more than five manuscript pages. I was still doing that with Pattern Recognition,
out of nervousness that all the computers would die and take my book with them. I was printing it out and
sending it to first readers by fax, usually beginning with the first page. I’m still sending my output to readers
every day. But I’ve learned to just let it live in the hard drive, and once I’d quit printing out the daily output, I
lost track.
INTERVIEWER
For a while it was often reported, erroneously, that you typed all your books on a typewriter.
GIBSON
I wrote Neuromancer on a manual portable typewriter and about half of Count Zero on the same machine.
Then it broke, in a way that was more or less irreparable. Bruce Sterling called me shortly thereafter and
said, “This changes everything!” I said, “What?” He said, “My Dad gave me his Apple II. You have to get one
of these things!” I said, “Why?” He said, “Automation—it automates the process of writing!” I’ve never gone
back.
But I had only been using a typewriter because I’d gotten one for free and I was poor. In 1981, most people
were still writing on typewriters. There were five large businesses in Vancouver that did nothing but repair
and sell typewriters. Soon there were computers, too, and it was a case of the past and the future mutually
coexisting. And then the past just goes away.
INTERVIEWERFor someone who so often writes about the future of technology, you seem to have a real romance for
artifacts of earlier eras.
GIBSON
It’s harder to imagine the past that went away than it is to imagine the future. What we were prior to our
latest batch of technology is, in a way, unknowable. It would be harder to accurately imagine what New York
City was like the day before the advent of broadcast television than to imagine what it will be like after lifesize broadcast holography comes online. But actually the New York without the television is more mysterious,
because we’ve already been there and nobody paid any attention. That world is gone.
My great-grandfather was born into a world where there was no recorded music. It’s very, very difficult to
conceive of a world in which there is no possibility of audio recording at all. Some people were extremely
upset by the first Edison recordings. It nauseated them, terrified them. It sounded like the devil, they said,
this evil unnatural technology that offered the potential of hearing the dead speak. We don’t think about that
when we’re driving somewhere and turn on the radio. We take it for granted.
INTERVIEWER
Was television a big deal in your childhood?
GIBSON
I can remember my father bringing home our first set—this ornate wooden cabinet that was the size of a
small refrigerator, with a round cathode-ray picture tube and wooden speaker grilles over elaborate fabric.
Like a piece of archaic furniture, even then. Everybody would gather around at a particular time for a
broadcast—a baseball game or a variety show or something. And then it would go back to a mandala that
was called a test pattern, or nothing—static.
We know that something happened then. We know that broadcast television did something—did
everything—to us, and that now we aren’t the same, though broadcast television, in that sense, is already
almost over. I can remember seeing the emergence of broadcast television, but I can’t tell what it did to us
because I became that which watched broadcast television.
The strongest impacts of an emergent technology are always unanticipated. You can’t know what people
are going to do until they get their hands on it and start using it on a daily basis, using it to make a buck and
using it for criminal purposes and all the different things that people do. The people who invented pagers, for
instance, never imagined that they would change the shape of urban drug dealing all over the world. But
pagers so completely changed drug dealing that they ultimately resulted in pay phones being removed from
cities as part of a strategy to prevent them from becoming illicit drug markets. We’re increasingly aware that
our society is driven by these unpredictable uses we find for the products of our imagination.
INTERVIEWER
What was it like growing up in Wytheville, Virginia?
GIBSON
Wytheville was a small town. I wasn’t a very happy kid, but there were aspects of the town that delighted
me. It was rather short on books, though. There was a rotating wire rack of paperbacks at the Greyhound
station on Main Street, another one at a soda fountain, and another one at a drugstore. That was all the book
retail anywhere in my hometown.
My parents were both from Wytheville. They eventually got together, though rather late for each of them.
My father had been married previously, and my mother was probably regarded as a spinster. My mother’s
family had been in Wytheville forever and was quite well-off and established, in a very small-town sort of way.
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby starfox64 » Fri Sep 06, 2013 8:28 am

bela wrote:I feel like Cyberpunks must be the most content subcultures ever. Has any other sub culture got the future they wanted? Punks, hippies, goths all wanted a type of world that they never got and look like anachronisms because of it. Cyberpunks live in a cyberpunk world (right now at least)


hardly. where are the cybernetic implants to connect me directly to the future internet?

until we get those (or these ghost in the shell finger things to type super fast), none of us will truly be cyberpunks

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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby germinal » Sat Sep 07, 2013 4:54 pm

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rip ndg
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby can- » Sat Sep 07, 2013 11:58 pm

LL bean commando sweater

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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby starfox64 » Sun Sep 08, 2013 12:39 am

i know you like ll bean but isn't that just a standard military sweater?
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby can- » Sun Sep 08, 2013 9:47 am

there are a bunch of them, margiela does the best repros but I couldn't find any pix. I linked the bean one cos it's wool (mil/police versions are acrylic) and the details/price are right
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby starfox64 » Mon Sep 09, 2013 7:10 am

ervell made one last year iirc
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby can- » Fri Sep 13, 2013 12:11 am

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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby maj » Fri Sep 13, 2013 8:52 am

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Major General John "Hacks" Dunning (Viscount Windsor) aka peak angry nerd
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby can- » Sun Sep 15, 2013 12:52 pm

Diary of a cyberpunk

currently hurtling thru space in a metal box (to visit my parents =). there are outlets in every row, but alas no wifi. there are only two outlets for a three seat row. what about a jacket that converts into a mobile relay station, w embedded power strip and antennae?

almost got into a knife fight with this warrior on the 6 train:

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clothed for comfort and function:

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what's in the pocket?
Spoiler:
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over
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby thomaspaine » Sun Sep 15, 2013 5:02 pm

Real cyberpunk would have taken these pictures with google glass
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby bels » Mon Sep 16, 2013 2:51 am

Google glass is too fragile x dorky for a street samurai.
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby thomaspaine » Mon Sep 16, 2013 3:03 am

Google glass is so dorky, but why is that? Would better looking frames and design make them cooler or is the technology inherently dorky at this point in time?
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