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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby starfox64 » Mon Sep 16, 2013 3:24 am

glasses are pretty dorky
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby can- » Mon Sep 16, 2013 5:10 pm

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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby maj » Wed Sep 18, 2013 5:09 am

was on my way to school today when this dude rolled past me on his bike. black frame, red tires straight out of tron and then a colour coordinated outfit, black Adidas trackies,red running sneaks, black tee and this red scarf covering his mouth. finish it off he had these tekkan like gloves on which looked like something out of an anime all red white highlights.

was even more bizarre as it was in some suburban cul-de-sac in my small town, not exactly a urban metropolis. cyberpunk gone to visit his nan, was not expecting it at 8 in the morning.
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby charybdis » Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:37 am

Have you all have seen caithnard's cyberpunk album?

http://imgur.com/a/oQLZN#6

http://www.reddit.com/r/femalefashionad ... cyberpunk/

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And stuff
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my mother is a kenzo fish sweater
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby odradek » Wed Sep 18, 2013 10:16 pm

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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby can- » Wed Sep 18, 2013 11:31 pm

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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby can- » Thu Sep 19, 2013 11:38 am

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my phone died while I was taking a fit pic

all that remains is this ghost of a fit...

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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby can- » Mon Sep 23, 2013 9:45 pm

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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby smiles » Thu Sep 26, 2013 9:56 am

neil barrett for samsonite. entitled travelwear.

The clothes, for men, women and children, are meant to perform sleight of hand. One jacket adjusts to the wearer's body temperature, so that the wearer would theoretically be as comfortable in it in Cleveland as in Phoenix. Other jackets have travel pillows or reading lamps that pop out of the collars. In one instance, a hiking coat comes with a walking stick incongruously attached (in case the hiker falls down and is injured), along with a flask inside a pocket (in case he wants to numb the pain with some Maker's Mark). Some pants have zip-off legs to turn them into shorts.


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My professor gave me this book to look over today. She was the ghost writer for Andrew Bolton. Circa 2000 cyberpunk. 'Supermodern Wardrobe. Check the SPOILER
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Spoiler:
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VEXED generation. It was ACR a bit before ACR. Urban protection for revolting youth.
ballistic nylon jacket neoprene backing and pocket for gasmask. between the legs fastening for full coverage. extra padding around spine and kidney areas for protection from knives. aw 1995-6
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detail of neck
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zip spiral balaneck. denim
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Mandarina Duck 'apparel' modular system. Three layers: exowear(outer layers), mesowear(shirts, sweaters, tees) endowear(skirts and trousers). Subcategories: cell, cocoon, egg, pocket. Subcategories are defined by style and material. For example, 'cell' exowear uses 'fiberduck' a paperlike fabric that is breathable and wind and water resistant. 'light fiberduck' is used in the mesowear and endowear layers. it is extremely lightweight and allows light to permeate. subcategory 'cocoon' uses cotton woven with steel (called 'ironduck'). Egg subcategory uses a tear resistant, waterproof cotton bound nylon. 'pocket' garments are cotton coated with polyurethane and then soldered with glue for a seamless appearance.

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mesowear 'cocoon' and endowear 'move' in crepe cotton
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mesowear 'pocket' jacket with endowear 'cocoon' aeropants
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c. 2000's interfaced tech
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more modular clothing by patrik cox
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final home 46 pocket jacket
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maharishi 'futura' splinter urban camo
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mobile survival sac by british artist lucy orta.
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issey miyake transformable jackets
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草地跑過的腳印
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby bels » Sun Sep 29, 2013 6:23 am

Errolson Hugh interview for you

http://www.businessoffashion.com/2013/0 ... ction.html

BERLIN, Germany — You’d be forgiven for not knowing much about Acronym. The company never advertises and with no public relations strategy to speak of, its founders are tough to reach. They prefer to let their designs speak for themselves and whether you know it or not, they’ve been pacing the vanguard of technically-focused fashion for nearly two decades.

Founded in 1994 by Errolson Hugh and Michaela Sachenbacher, Acronym is an incredibly lean and agile operation. The founders are as likely to refer to themselves as a guerrilla unit as a clothing company, but since 2002, they’ve produced their own apparel label. It’s sleek and futuristic, tough, functional and undeniably cool. It’s so brim-full of performance features that they offer a glossary to help customers interpret them. And though the technical nature of the garments is a selling point in certain markets, you needn’t know the difference between Gore-Tex and Super Composite Skin to appreciate how well they function.

Acronym began as a design agency offering contract services to larger firms. Their first job was with a German snowboarding company called Protective, which they quickly parlayed into a role with Burton Snowboards. Their relationship with Burton was a resounding mutual success that lasted nearly 14 years. Hugh spoke fondly of the partnership: “Burton was great because they were so irreverent. Snowboarding’s inherently technical. You need the protection, you need the performance for the activity, but it’s got such a punk rock spirit to it. There was never an idea that was too crazy.”

“There’s no marketing budget that you’re paying for. It’s all going into the gear.”
Working heavily with sportswear and military technology, Hugh and Sachenbacher developed an interest in applying them to everyday attire. For Hugh, the impulse to marry technical performance to formal elegance is deeply rooted. “I started karate when I was 10, and I was given the traditional karate uniform, the gi, which is a very Japanese form of pattern-making. Right after that I realised, ‘Wow, I can do things in this suit I can’t do in my regular clothes.’ That’s always informed Acronym.”

Hugh and Sachenbacher pitched this notion of form-meets-hyperfunction to several of their partners. None were interested in pursuing it. According to Hugh, they were puzzled by the concept: “They all said, ‘Why would you want to do that? It’s so difficult, it’s so expensive. We don’t get it.’ So, out of frustration, we decided to do it ourselves.”

Acronym’s first collection, dubbed Kit-1, was released in 2002, in an edition of 120. Nearly three years in the making (“It almost killed us,” says Hugh), it consisted of a jacket, a bag, a soundtrack, software, catalogues featuring concept art, and few other small items. Not exactly a typical first offering. The response was strong, and the concept resonated with industry fixtures. Their first full collection, released in Fall 2003, was carried by tastemakers like Colette in Paris.

With zero marketing besides word-of-mouth and a handful of magazine features, the best explanation for Acronym’s immediate success was the work itself. “Because we came from a design background, our entire business model, such as it was, was purely product-based. The whole structure of the company was set up to build exactly what we wanted with no compromises.”


Source: Acronym
Acronym has never strayed from this single-minded focus on product design, and it’s the key to unpacking their success. “There’s no marketing budget that you’re paying for when you buy one of our jackets,” says Hugh. “It’s all going into the gear. I think people can sense that, and you can see it in the end product.” Stated simply: to sell a hard-shell jacket for over $1,000, you just have to make a hard-shell jacket that’s worth over $1,000.

This is all to say that Acronym’s customers — enthusiasts might be a more apt descriptor — have understood its vision from jump. Despite daunting price-points, Hugh never worries about leaving product on the shelves. “What people really want out of Acronym is how uncompromised it is.”

Over the past decade, Acronym has cultivated a relationship of trust with its audience, which has allowed them to achieve things most labels wouldn’t dare attempt. “If we had to run the stuff by our sales team or our commercial department, I can imagine it would be very difficult to make it happen. One season we reduced our apparel offerings from the normal 20 to four, which was risky, but it was one of our most successful seasons.”

That renegade spirit is what makes Acronym such a unique brand. Whether they intended to or not, they’ve built a positive feedback loop where operational innovation facilitates design innovation. “When you have the product in front of you, it’s hard to imagine it’s made by the size of company it’s made by. But we can do that because we strip everything else away.” When Hugh says “everything else,” he means it: until 2009, he and Sachenbacher were the company’s only employees. The team has since grown, but remains puny by wider industry standards. By staying so lean, Acronym is able to offer several avant-garde pieces per season. Their runs are small, their market is devoted and their reputation for quality is unimpeachable. No matter how far out one of their pieces seems, consumers know it will function as intended and then some.

Acronym’s product-first philosophy has generated some unique business practices, too. In 2005, they introduced Subnet Mask, an invitation-only website that is the locus of their wholesale business. “Subnet Mask is our dealer website. It’s the tool we made up to address the fact that we didn’t have the time or the money to travel to sell the collection.” To access Subnet Mask, you need a password granted “by recommendation” from Acronym. Once inside, you can view photos and videos of the new collection. Orders are placed on the website, and cancelled if deposits aren’t made promptly. Simple. “That’s how we avoided having to deal with all of the traffic control of managing accounts,” says Hugh. “We just don’t have the time.”

Though the brand was viewed as something of a curiosity at first, the industry has caught on quickly. “When we started, the technology we were using was a new thing for fashion,” says Hugh. “Our focus was always on quality. For us, the technology is quality. It’s not an end in itself. That notion of technology being quality has become much more understood in the industry.” As a result, Acronym fields an endless stream of requests from brands seeking to access their expertise, which allows them to be picky when choosing collaborators. Currently, they design Stone Island Shadow Project, Herno Laminar, and Disaeran for Japanese retailer United Arrows. These co-productions are essential to Acronym’s continued growth. Hugh considers them invaluable learning experiences: “We’re constantly getting to see the insides of companies we normally wouldn’t get to see. All of them do something really well. All of them also face different challenges, so you can learn at a really fast rate.”

A higher profile has its downsides, too. Last June, Gucci showed a jacket as part of its Men’s Spring 2014 collection that bears an uncanny resemblance to Acronym’s GT-J5A jacket, introduced in 2006. While that sort of line-for-line copying is typical in the world of fast fashion, it’s surprising for a house as venerable as Gucci, and, in Hugh’s view, indicative of an industry in distress.

“I just laugh at the Gucci thing because it doesn’t really hurt us. But it isn’t actually that funny. And with those resources they shouldn’t have to do that. I’m almost sure that somebody had it as a sample, and there was a deadline crunch, and they needed that slot to be filled, and they sent it to the factory and knocked it off. Probably no one person is even responsible for it, but the whole system is under such pressure, even at that scale. They’re under extraordinary pressure to keep up the pace. In my view, this is a broken system, in many ways.”

When we’re designing something for Acronym, we’re designing the result, not the product itself.
Hugh takes solace in the fact that even though another label might produce garments that look like Acronym, they’re unlikely to function like Acronym. Recently, much of the label’s focus has been on pushing the envelope in pattern making. “At the beginning it was definitely the materials, and now we’re more into the way things fit and how they work on the body, as far as kinesiology, and how they move,” Hugh explains. “Lotta [Saas, a member of the design team] spends pretty much all her time working for us trying to figure out how to make things do what they aren’t supposed to in terms of the pattern. It looks like a regular pair of pants but allows you to move as if you’re wearing a track pant for competition.”

When asked what he thought the future of apparel holds, Hugh replied with a quotation from speculative fiction godhead William Gibson: “‘Interface evolves towards transparency.’ What I get out of that is that the gimmicks disappear. All of the bells and whistles go. When we’re designing something for Acronym, we’re designing the result, not the product itself. The thing that it allows you to do, that’s the focus.”

“In karate, you’re taught to punch through the target. We’re trying to design through the product. The product is there, it’s the vehicle, but it’s not actually what we’re about.”
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby UnwashedMolasses » Tue Oct 01, 2013 10:12 pm

Exoskeletal Legs for paraplegics :



Shirt that gathers electricity from sound :



Is transhumanism typically discussed in the same mold as cyberpunk? It seems like it goes in the same category. Thoughts on it? Things you'd like to see/be able to do? Any thoughts on how clothing could interface with biomechanical modifications? If Acronym sticks around I could see them incorporating this kind of thing into their clothing.

Article on current body modifications:

http://www.theverge.com/2012/8/8/317743 ... dy-hackers

Some excerpts:

Cannon showed me a small device he and Sarver created called the Bottlenose. It’s a rectangle of black metal about half the size of a pack of cigarettes that slips over your finger. Named after the echolocation used by dolphins, it sends out an electromagnetic pulse and measures the time it takes to bounce back. Cannon slips it over his finger and closes his eyes. "I can kind of sweep the room and get this picture of where things are." He twirls around the half-empty cellar, eyes closed, then stops, pointing directly at my chest. "The magnet in my finger is extremely sensitive to these waves. So the Bottlenose can tell me the shape of things around me and how far away they are."


Neil Harbisson was born with a condition that allows him to see only in black and white. He became interested in cybernetics, and eventually began wearing the Eyeborg, a head-mounted camera which translated colors into vibrations that Harbisson could hear. The addition of the Eyeborg to his passport has led some to dub him the first cyborg officially recognized by the federal government.


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"The other main issue was that the operation would allow me to perceive outside the ability of human vision and human hearing (hearing via the bone allows you to hear a wider range of sounds, from infrasounds to ultrasounds, and some lenses can detect ultraviolets and infrareds)"
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby ramseames » Wed Oct 02, 2013 5:51 am

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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby starfox64 » Wed Oct 02, 2013 10:03 pm

new outlier bomber

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$600 tho
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby ramseames » Wed Oct 02, 2013 11:13 pm

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really hate that pocket on the shoulder. Merino lining sounds like a good idea. don't know how I feel about the price
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby can- » Thu Oct 03, 2013 12:00 am

hate the Schoeller materials outlier picks for these outers. the last bomber they made was pretty bad.

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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby bels » Thu Oct 03, 2013 1:52 am

What's wrong with Schoeller?

Never touched outlier or schoeller just interested.
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby can- » Thu Oct 03, 2013 2:23 am

nothing wrong with schoeller, the fabrics make great pants but i've never been on board with soft shells and the bombers made out of 3xdry or whatever it is feel really insubstantial and synthetic.
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby bels » Thu Oct 03, 2013 2:35 am

soft shells for life death to the hard shell

All this cyberpunk shit is making me want to buy cyberpunk shit.
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby Syeknom » Thu Oct 03, 2013 7:33 am

No buying cyberpunk shit bela, be good
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby maj » Thu Oct 03, 2013 8:29 am

doing anarchism and in politics class and it's making me lust for a dystopian scifi future where we all live in a different star cluster
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby germinal » Thu Oct 03, 2013 11:07 pm

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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby germinal » Tue Oct 08, 2013 2:50 pm

gravity pocket

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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby bels » Wed Oct 09, 2013 3:02 am

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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby bels » Wed Oct 09, 2013 9:08 am

No Maps For These Territories

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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby germinal » Sat Oct 12, 2013 7:49 am

Went to DSM; tried on the veil jacket... holy fucking shit the bed it's the best piece of kit i've ever handled - the sort of jacket you could own for years and find new details every time you wear it. Double layered sleeves with elastic thumb straps, zip cuff; i counted 7 pockets on first examination; all the buttons are needlessly complicated - each buttonhole is on a separate piece of fabric that is riveted to the main jacket; rubber-backed collar; beautifully fitting hood with the weird stowable veil (also rubber-backed at the bottom to add weight and ease stowing); drawstrings everywhere, too many to count; not to mention the entire jacket is made up in super-lightweight mesh (the hardware adds heft to the whole thing, so it doesn't feel fragile at all); the tag is a thin, wide strip with the Aitor Throup logo, "New Object Research" and almost certainly the number of the jacket - i'm kicking myself that i forgot to look. The jacket fit me perfectly and looked amazing and i could easily see myself wearing it on the daily; if i had £2500 to spare i would have no qualms on spending that much - you can see where your money's going in every detail.

Both skull bags have been redesigned since previous releases, and the price has been jacked up accordingly (apparently they were sold for a loss first time round). The backpack is now in a soft malleable nylon. Last time the material was stiffer and felt sturdier, and gave the bag it's structure. This time it's evident that it's the panelling and sewing that supports the skull form. Hardware and leather feels the same as before (robust as fuck). The SA said that bag sold within half an hour. In fact all the bags and hats that DSM were allocated sold in the first day - by the time i got there, two days later, only two shirts, the veil jacket, the trumpeter's uniform and the denim jacket were left in stock (everything else was for display only). The Shiva bag now has two zips on top, which is a sensible redesign, and feels a bit smaller, tho i may be misremembering. This one is made up in a fuzzy wool which i prefer to the more traditional suiting fabrics used last time. Again, hardware feels like you could club someone to death with it.

Both the hats - the band-leader's hat with a clear brim, and the face mask cap - felt a bit cheap, and in fact i think i might have damaged the former when i picked it up... oops. The shirts are cool-looking - made from a fairly stiff, dry poplin; sewn edge-to-edge; seams taped with clear plastic, inside and out; laser cut pockets - but completely impractical: all but unlaunderable, and i guarantee the tape will peel after a couple of seasons. The denim jacket was unchanged from the previous release: still the same rubber-backed denim, sewn edge-to-edge etc. Trumpeter's coat is very cool - the trumpet case unfolds to form part of the collar - but i didn't bother trying it on. Apparently DSM didn't get the Mongolian parka, which sucks because it was the piece i most wanted to see. Sorry I don't have any pictures, they're strictly forbidden, and i was never left alone long enough to sneak one. I grabbed another two copies of his manifesto on the way out... now i have four lol
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby bels » Sat Oct 12, 2013 9:59 am

Looking around the SF thread on Aitor I found someone reffing the "60s/70s Swiss Alpenflage Parka" which sent me on a journey.

Found some further info about it here: http://sharky-fourbees.blogspot.co.uk/2 ... packs.html

Almost can't see the thousands of pockets:
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Apparently has a backpack which somehow attaches to the jacket (Not skull shaped tho)
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This Swiss camouflage pattern comes in two versions. The early version issued in the late fifties had no white in it.
These are the later issue items.

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56) Magazines for Stgw 57.
57) "White" magazine (for firing riflegrenades), ABC- protectionsheet, reflecting legband.
58 ) Food, toiletpaper.
59) Armyknife, hearingprotection, private items.
60) First aid dressing.

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61) Gun cleaningkit, universal cleaningkit.
62) Cooking utensils.
63) Canteen with cup and cutlery, proviant pouch.
A gasmask in a carryingpouch and a flashlight (fitted to the waistbelt or chest) were carried apart.

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65) Stickhandgrenades / military manuals.
66) Rainprotection and winter untensils, washing in plastic bag, emergency cooker.
67) Riflegrenades.
68 ) fitted to the Combatpack; the shovel or/and pickel.


taken from http://theswissriflesdotcommessageboard ... llV-opDvb- which has some super deep otaku tier analysis and breakdown.

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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby germinal » Sat Oct 12, 2013 2:22 pm

yah it's an exact remake of that, and now i've found that out it has been robbed of some of it's attraction - it's no longer the design plucked fully-fledged from some twisted corner of AT's mind that i thought it was. On the other hand it's a cool reference to make. i wonder if Sportswear co. ever did a version...
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby bels » Sat Oct 12, 2013 2:26 pm

I wonder how difficult it would be to pick one up and overdye it.

Throughout my teenage years I had a NATO surplus army jacket which was overdyed and I loved it.
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby maj » Mon Oct 14, 2013 6:07 pm

aitor throup close ups

cargos

Spoiler:
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hindo shirt

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riding jacket

Spoiler:
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

Postby starfox64 » Wed Oct 16, 2013 4:34 am

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