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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Wed Oct 16, 2013 6:33 pm
by bels
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One handed magnetic zip from underarmour

Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Wed Oct 16, 2013 10:02 pm
by JonjoShelvey
What kind of eyeglasses do cyberpunks wear?

Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Wed Oct 16, 2013 10:03 pm
by can-
LASIK eye surgery

Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Wed Oct 16, 2013 10:18 pm
by starfox64
cybernetic eye implants

Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Wed Oct 16, 2013 11:22 pm
by can-
Cyberpunks wear Dr Marten's Keiths

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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2013 6:20 am
by maj
went to Reading the other day and all the tactical bros are coming out with the increasing rain. the ones you see kitted out in some huge cargos, airwalks, millets style technical backbacks and jackets darting for the trains. i have one in my form at 6th and every time i see him it's like a mgs mercenary is walking towards me, he has mastered the longer sleeve over short sleeve. will have to take a photo one of these days.

Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2013 8:01 am
by bels
Ramblercore x geog student

Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2013 9:55 am
by germinal
cunts in millets style technical backpacks (worn with grey pinstripe suit, berghaus fleece/jacket) keep whipping me in the face with their drawstrings on the tube

Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2013 9:58 am
by bels
Just found out that Errolson Hugh is the asian du who models all the acr stuff. Mind blown.

Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2013 10:15 am
by bels
Germinal if I'm not mistaken, cunts in millets style backpacks are the reason Syeknom's contract specifies that he cannot travel less than first class.

Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2013 10:19 am
by Syeknom
I had to stand up today next to a bloke with a bike, I'm well peeved off

Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Fri Oct 18, 2013 1:30 pm
by b4my
Tbh I think the coolest thing about living in our weird cyberpunk future isn't the tech stuff, but the way subcultures and scenes (really tied into fashion) spring up all over the place due to the internet and whatnot. There's a bit in Neuromancer where Gibson talks about there being dozens of subcultures that last a few weeks and that's basically where we're at now: these weird like minded people connect on tumblr and stuff, things spring up, get attention for a minute, and then fade out.

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Nothing more cyberpunk than this guy imo.

Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Fri Oct 18, 2013 9:06 pm
by purkinje
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2013 12:27 pm
by can-
ForceLock

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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2013 6:15 pm
by purkinje
Some gorillaz artwork gives off a cyberpunk kind of jizz. Costumes they draw their characters in are really neat. Their book Rise of the Ogre has some really cool illustrations in it.

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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2013 11:02 pm
by aucontrairearto
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how that magnet zipper works, if you're wondering

Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Tue Oct 29, 2013 11:02 pm
by can-

Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Thu Dec 05, 2013 6:38 pm
by UnwashedMolasses
Cool SuFu fit I thought belonged here:

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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Sat Dec 07, 2013 6:47 pm
by LegallySmelf
Got a cyberpunk tag on my tumblr. http://legallysmelf.tumblr.com/tagged/cyberpunk

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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Sun Dec 08, 2013 3:52 am
by BobbyZamora
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Fri Dec 27, 2013 2:56 am
by bels
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Geraldson Pew wearing the Aitor CP jacket

Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2014 3:12 am
by ramseames
[vimeo]83793707[/vimeo]

luv the shots of vancouver in this

edit: http://vimeo.com/83793707

ne1 know how vimeo links work if not like youtube ones?

Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2014 8:55 pm
by Dobwin
maj wrote:aitor throup close ups

cargos

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hindo shirt

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riding jacket

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I want that riding jacket more than anything else in the world, but that price >.<

Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2014 10:57 pm
by rjbman
[vimeo]http://www.vimeo.com/83793707[/vimeo]

Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Wed Jan 15, 2014 12:30 pm
by rjbman
just realized "code" didn't preserve it either. ramseames it was [vimeo ] http://www.vimeo.com/83793707, the www was what fixed it for me.

Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Wed Jan 15, 2014 3:51 pm
by can-
miscus FINAL HOME

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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Wed Jan 15, 2014 4:18 pm
by kyung
yellow reminded me of this

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from the movie the host

Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Wed Jan 15, 2014 7:54 pm
by rjbman
Interview with Errolson Hugh about SISP

Spoiler:
Errolson Hugh has been on the bleeding edge of progressive menswear for nearly two decades. Co-founder of Acronym and designer of Stone Island's Shadow Project, he's your favourite designer's favourite designer, continually pushing the envelope with truly contemporary work. In Hugh's own words, Shadow Project is "an enabler, both technical as well as aesthetic." We spoke to him from Milan about his work with Stone Island, the brand's legacy, and what's next for the Shadow Project line.

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NOMAD: Tell us a bit about how you began working with Stone Island on Shadow Project.

ERROLSON: We started with Stone Island six years ago. One of our friends, a German designer named Marc Buhre, is the designer of Stone Island's interiors. All the shops, all the flagship stores - he does all the interior design, all the fixtures and all that stuff, and had been working with them for ages. He also did the first packaging we ever had, the box set for the Acronym Kit-01. He would go down to work at Sportswear Company [Stone Island's parent company] and would always have our bags. They were always like, "What are those? Those are amazing!" When their designer, Paul Harvey, retired, they were like, "Okay, now you really have to tell us where you got those bags." That's how we hooked up. I got a call, Michaela [Sachenbacher, co-founder of Acronym] and I flew down there for an interview, had a chat with Carlo [Rivetti, Director at Stone Island] and Sabina [Rivetti, Director at Stone Island]. That was that.

N: What makes Shadow Project different from Stone Island's mainline?

E: It has a different function. The reason it's called Shadow is because it's a by-product of the mainline. You can't have Shadow without the mainline. Shadow's purpose... Carlo calls it his Formula-1 team. It's kind of evolved over time. In general, I would say the objective is to push things forward and experiment. There's a lot more freedom. There's nothing to lose with Shadow. The original thing we tried to do was introduce performance materials into Stone Island's methodology. Over the course of the first four years of Shadow that was our main focus – learning how to build performance materials in the sense of sportswear. Water-repellent, waterproof, breathable, that kind of thing, but built with the Stone Island aesthetic and using the Stone Island tools to do it. So, garment-dyed, treated, things that really don't look like traditional performance materials. When we first started, it was quite difficult. They have their own fabric research department and they had to really get their head around, "Okay, it looks cool, it feels great, it has this neat, rubberized effect – and now you want to make it breathable?" It's like, the first three are already really hard to do. So, that took a long time. We just recently shifted the focus of Shadow because we all felt that had already been explored and a lot of the technology and know-how we had developed for Shadow had found its way into the mainline. There're a lot of really high-performance materials in the mainline now, as well, so we didn't feel that was enough of a differentiation. Now our mandate is almost more of an aesthetic exploration. Pushing the boundaries of what Stone Island can be. Recently, there's been a lot of work in knitwear, and a lot of work in graphics, graphical applications and that kind of thing, which we're continuing for the next summer and next winter. We're in the middle of next winter right now.

N: Can you expand on the graphics part a bit?

E: Without giving anything away? Using graphical applications as part of the fabric development process. So, instead of just printing something on, we're corroding it out. We're doing what's called a reverse colour process, where you have a fabric that starts out basically black, and then on top of that we'll print a graphic, like a silkscreen, also in black, so you can't really see it. Then we'll corrode the fabric, and where the print is not, all the black, the fabric dye, gets eaten away and you're left with the shadow of the printed graphic. It's inside the material, though. It's got a dimension to it. You'll see that in Spring/Summer that'll deliver in a couple months.

Then we've taken that and pushed it again another level further for next winter. That's really, really interesting. And, again, that's the exterior of the fabric that looks like a rubber but is actually a laminate. And it's also waterproof, breathable, the whole thing. The last reason you'd buy that jacket, though, is that it's waterproof and breathable. The aesthetics are so far out and so interesting that you don't even... It's not even worth mentioning.

The fabric research part is really what makes Stone Island in general so exciting. There's no other company I've worked for where fabric design is part of the brief. You're designing the pieces for the collection, which is a normal designer thing to do, but then you're also designing the fabrics.

N: That's kind of Stone Island's raison d'être.

E: Absolutely. The interesting thing about it is that you're designing them both at the same time. And because the timeline's so short, you don't actually see what happens when you put them together until the end. So, it's always like, you put the stuff in the oven, you close it, you open it up a little later, and it pops out. Sometimes it's amazing, and sometimes you're like, "Yeah, no." It's incredibly interesting.

N: Something that's really essential to Shadow Project that's different from a lot of the brands we carry at Nomad is the aspect of modularity. Could you tell us why that's become such a big part of the Shadow Project stuff?

E: That came out of wanting to create things that we thought were really contemporary, just in terms of modern life. The seasonal approach to producing apparel and buying it has become so out of whack. There are no real seasons anymore. And, also, the weather patterns of the Earth...

N: fake canada has, like, two seasons now.

E: Yeah. Plus, people are traveling all the time. So, layering and modularity became a given. You don't want to spend that much money on a jacket that you can't wear all year round in all situations, or in as many as possible. And the modularity was just a way to explore that, to give people more options and freedom. And allow people to mix and match and put things together in ways they feel work for them. We're actually really happy that we've been able to come up with a system that's simple enough and unobtrusive enough that we've managed to maintain it for the duration. There's new modular vests in the next winter collection that will fit into the jackets from the first season.

N: The fabrics you're using for Shadow Project – as you discussed, they're a huge part of what the line is. We picked up a relatively modest selection of stuff from this season, but two items we did get were the Bomber and Blazer in the SOLO-R fabric – could you tell us a bit about that fabric?

E: We originally developed that fabric for the season before, in the summer, and we were looking to make something ultra light, but still aesthetically interesting, and still performance – so, again, waterproof, breathable. Probably the most interesting thing about that collection is that it's garment-dyed. So, you do the production run all in the raw off-white or grey colour, and then according to the order, they're all dyed as complete items. That's interesting because you get all the colouration on all the accessories, as well, all the tapes, the velcros, the buttons. All that has kind of a tonal quality, all within the same range.

And then the other thing that's interesting about the fabric is that the construction of it, the way it goes together, is actually what gives it its aesthetic interest. The shiny dots that make up the sheen, those are actually the glue that holds the membrane to the surface of the fabric. So, there's nothing extra, there's nothing decorative about it. In a way, it's almost a deconstructivist kind of thing, because you're actually showing the construction of the membrane.

N: What has Shadow Project enabled you to do that you haven't been able to do with Acronym?

E: Colour. Colour, and all the fabric research. We've learned an incredible amount making things in Italy. The way things are made in Italy is unique, I think, to the world. The tradition, the manufacturing culture in Italy is so, so strong, stronger than anywhere else I've ever seen it. It's incredible to meet people who have been in the industry – like, Carlo is eighth-generation textile. And his son, Silvio, will be the next. It's crazy. People identify themselves with their work here, with manufacturing, with making fabrics, with knitting garments. And, so, when you talk to them about it, and you talk to them on the level of, "I'm really into this and want to try that," if you're sparking new ideas, they're totally excited to try it. They're not like, "Well, are you gonna order two million?" It's really a product, craftsmanship-based culture that I hadn't encountered at that level before. Without which, Stone Island is basically impossible. The suppliers they work with closely, they have a partnership where, in some cases, Stone Island is almost like their research division. There's an incredible amount of openness between the fabric suppliers, even the yarn manufacturers, or the dyers. That's something we would never have seen otherwise. And then, of course, designing fabrics is something you just don't usually get a chance to do. And designing fabrics in the way Stone Island can make them is also its own special thing. Very, very interesting.

Garment dying is also directly related to the colour aspect I was mentioning, because you can do basically as many colours as you want, and they way they turn out is a little alchemical. You don't actually know what will happen. You have the formula for the colour, and you have the composition of the piece, but when those two things meet - and depending on how many materials are in the item – one material might absorb, you know, 80% of the colour and 20% of it goes to another one and you get kind of an effect. Or it doesn't penetrate the seams, or whatever, whatever. You never really 100% know what you're going to get, which is a really interesting thing to have. Even if you don't consciously recognize you're looking at a garment-dyed piece, you subconsciously realize there's something different about it. That human, handmade aspect, that random bit of noise that's in the pieces – you don't usually get that with something that's technical in the classical sense.

N: Very cool. You have some history with fake canada. You lived here for awhile.

E: [laughs] I lived there and went to Ryerson. They tried to kick me out twice. That's fine.

N: How do you think Shadow Project fits into the city of fake canada?

E: You know what? I have no idea. I haven't been back to fake canada in 12 years. When I go to Canada it's always – I was going to Arctery'x for awhile in Vancouver, and then I visited my mom for Christmas in Edmonton. I haven't been to fake canada in at least a decade, so I don't think I can answer that in any kind of useful way.

Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Mon Jan 20, 2014 11:06 am
by saveed_samir
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Re: RU a cyberpunk?

PostPosted: Tue Jan 21, 2014 4:04 pm
by iwtt
damon albarn's new video is created by aitor and gives me quite a few cyberpunk vibes