Being-in-the-world [architecture thread]

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Re: Being-in-the-world [architecture thread]

Postby bels » Tue Dec 29, 2015 12:58 pm

Birmingham is built on a hubristic vision of post war Britain which began to disintegrate before it was ever finished. All hail the Aston Expressway, may it raise us above the boarded up terraces of our past. All hail the number 11 bus, may we find ourselves encircled by the slow drudgery of its routine. All hail John Madin, may he encase us all in concrete, in stone, in rebar, that we may be consigned to this city and have our lives buried with it.
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Re: Being-in-the-world [architecture thread]

Postby bels » Wed Feb 17, 2016 11:46 am

The security doors in my building all have narrow glass panels but the angles you approach them at mean you can never see if there's someone on the other side or not so I keep smashing people in the face when I barge doors open.
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Re: Being-in-the-world [architecture thread]

Postby dbcooper » Wed Feb 17, 2016 7:41 pm

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Re: Being-in-the-world [architecture thread]

Postby Syeknom » Wed Mar 16, 2016 2:37 pm

Tour Albert - Purple Magazine

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the first tower in paris

The Tour Albert is the forgotten icon of 1960s French architecture. It is the work of the architect Édouard Albert, a close friend of Jean Prouvé, and has been constructed in collaboration with Robert Boileau and Jacques Henri-Labourdette. It stands 67 meters and 23 stories tall at a bend in Rue Croulebarbe, a quiet street in the 13th arrondissement of Paris. The Tour Albert went up in 1960 as Paris’s first skyscraper, but it seems somewhat ill at ease with its pioneering feat in a capital where, with rare exceptions, regulations forbid construction beyond the seventh floor. The tower is set back, as if hidden, and soars only when you come face to face with it.

Today, of course, with the subsequent explosion in the ’70s of apartment towers in the 13th, the Tour Albert seems relatively modest, but its qualities remain exceptional. It is one of the rare examples of metal-tube architecture, with casement windows (swinging open to the outside). The resulting glass façade lends a sense of weightlessness. The tower is interrupted a third of the way up, at the sixth floor, by a 600-square-meter terrace, painted with geometric black-and-white forms by Jacques Lagrange (set designer for the filmmaker Jacques Tati). Thus, in its upper section, the Tour Albert seems to surge anew toward an unexpected sense of levity.

Everything about the tower seems to have been conceived not in terms of rigid oppositions, but as a dialogue of lightness and finesse with the identity of Paris and its Haussmannian landscape. The Haussmann style, which accounts for more than 60% of the city’s buildings, is characterized by dressed-stone façades that adorn the streets and thoroughfares of the capital while also shutting the buildings in on themselves. The spirit of the Tour Albert is the opposite. Moreover, the tower was not part of the competition to build ever higher. Parisian neighborhoods with skyscrapers tend to be projects in and of themselves. La Défense is a business district built ex nihilo. The Tour Montparnasse involved a reconstruction of the train
station and all its surroundings. And the towers of the 13th arrondissement replaced areas of squalor.

Listed on the Supplemental Registry of Historic Monuments since 1994, the Tour Albert seems an exception in the history of Parisian skyscraping. It stands in a more traditional urban setting and has the good grace to blend harmoniously into the Parisian landscape — creating no scandal and thumbing its nose at no one, despite the innovations of its architecture. And therein lies its charm, the charm of singularity.

The apartments are vast and bright, without the slightest hint of social-housing construction about them. The tubular structures and saltires supporting the tower are visible within the apartments. Early plans called for modular walls. A certain
sense of sophistication pervades the interior. The famous terrace, not without its poetry, is both a space and an urban lung. With regard to his buildings, Édouard Albert wrote: “It seems to me that the spirit of the times prefers to consider an edifice as a fractioned station of space.” If history is any guide, then we have our work cut out for us as we develop a vertical Paris that welcomes a wide, varied, socially mixed population, rather than a centralized Paris that stands opposed to a vast ring of commuter towns with increasingly intractable social problems.

END


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Re: Being-in-the-world [architecture thread]

Postby Syeknom » Tue Apr 05, 2016 7:01 am

Famed neo-futurist celebrity architect Dame Zaha Hadid passed away a few days ago, aged 65.

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Some of her designs:

Heydar Aliyev Center - Baku, Azerbaijan

The Center, designed to become the primary building for the nation’s cultural programs, breaks from the rigid and often monumental Soviet architecture that is so prevalent in Baku, aspiring instead to express the sensibilities of Azeri culture and the optimism of a nation that looks to the future.

The design of the Heydar Aliyev Center establishes a continuous, fluid relationship between its surrounding plaza and the building’s interior. The plaza, as the ground surface; accessible to all as part of Baku’s urban fabric, rises to envelop an equally public interior space and define a sequence of event spaces dedicated to the collective celebration of contemporary and traditional Azeri culture. Elaborate formations such as undulations, bifurcations, folds, and inflections modify this plaza surface into an architectural landscape that performs a multitude of functions: welcoming, embracing, and directing visitors through different levels of the interior. With this gesture, the building blurs the conventional differentiation between architectural object and urban landscape, building envelope and urban plaza, figure and ground, interior and exterior.


Spoiler:
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Messner Mountain Museum Corones - Italy
Embedded within the summit of Mount Kronplatz, 2,275m above sea level at the centre South Tyrol’s most popular ski resort, the Messner Mountain Museum Corones is surrounded by the alpine peaks of the Zillertal, Ortler and Dolomites. Established by renowned climber Reinhold Messner, the sixth and final Messner Mountain Museum explores the traditions, history and discipline of mountaineering.


Zaha - "The idea is that visitors can descend within the mountain to explore its caverns and grottos, before emerging through the mountain wall on the other side, out onto the terrace overhanging the valley far below with spectacular, panoramic views.”


Spoiler:
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Riverside Museum of Transport - Glasgow, Scotland

The historical development of the Clyde and the city is a unique legacy; with the site situated where the Kelvin flows into the Clyde the building can flow from the city to the river. In doing so it can symbolise a dynamic relationship where the museum is the voice of both, linking the two sides and allowing the museum to be the transition from one to the other. By doing so the museum places itself in the very context of its origin and encourages connectivity between its exhibits and their wider context.


Spoiler:
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Guangzhou Opera House - Guangzhou, China

Like pebbles in a stream smoothed by erosion, the Guangzhou Opera House sits in perfect harmony with its riverside location. The Opera House is at the heart of Guangzhou’s cultural development. Its unique twin-boulder design enhances the city by opening it to the Pearl River, unifying the adjacent cultural buildings with the towers of international finance in Guangzhou’s Zhujiang new town.


Spoiler:
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MAXXI — Museo nazionale delle arti del XXI secolo  - Rome, Italy

As declared by the architect, the museum is 'not a object-container, but rather a campus for art', where flows and pathways overlap and connect in order to create a dynamic and interactive space. Although the program is clear and organized in plan, flexibility of use is the main goal of the project. Continuity of spaces makes it a suitable place for any kind of moving and temporary exhibition, without redundant wall divisions or interruptions. Entering the atrium, the main elements of the project are evident: concrete curved walls, suspended black staircases, open ceiling catching natural light. By these elements Zaha Hadid intended 'a new fluid kind of spatiality of multiple perspective points and fragmented geometry, designed to embody the chaotic fluidity of modern life'.


Spoiler:
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520 West 28th Street - New York City, United States of America

"Our design is an integration of volumes that flow into each other and, following a coherent formal language, create the sensibility of the building's overall ensemble," explained Hadid. "With an arrangement that reinvents the spatial experience, each residence will have its own distinctive identity, offering multiple perspectives and exciting views of the neighborhood."


Spoiler:
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Port House Headquarters - Antwerp, Belgium

Spoiler:
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Re: Being-in-the-world [architecture thread]

Postby bels » Tue Aug 02, 2016 7:02 am

http://www.architectural-review.com/not ... s4.twitter

Topic has been done to death ofc but I enjoyed this article for its references to the previous attempts to claim public spaces as private and vice versa
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Re: Being-in-the-world [architecture thread]

Postby ramseames » Sun Nov 06, 2016 9:23 pm

https://www.ft.com/content/e0112c50-9f5 ... e238dee8e2

Little interview/profile of Tadao Ando in ft
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Re: Being-in-the-world [architecture thread]

Postby costanza » Mon Dec 19, 2016 6:01 pm

I feel like I need to adress the quote below in more than 140 characters as I'm reading Sylvia Lavin's 'Quatremére and the invention of a modern language of architecture' and the quote is highly relevant to a lot of Quatremére's theories. However it seemed too off topic to write a long post about architecture in the random fashion thoughts thread so I'm posting it here instead. I read through this thread and it has some very solid posts, and I felt I want to contribute with something. I'd like to write this in an easily accessible manner so people not familiar with architecture on this forum may appreciate it too, so some things might be overly explained.

adiabatic wrote:
costanza wrote:There is a Swiss contemporary architect named Pascal Flammer whose lecture I attended when he was in Sweden. In his lecture he explained how he wants to avoid the automatisms that we have in the building industry. He wants to question every decision he makes and see if the conclusion he comes to is interesting due to approaching the problem in a previously glossed over way.


Sounds like Howard Roark:

"Why do you want me to think that this is great architecture?" He pointed to the picture of the Parthenon.

"That," said the Dean, "is the Parthenon."

"So it is."

"I haven't the time to waste on silly questions."

"All right, then." Roark got up, he took a long ruler from the desk, he walked to the picture. "Shall I tell you what's rotten about it?"

"It’s the Parthenon!" said the Dean.

"Yes, God damn it, the Parthenon."

The ruler struck the glass over the picture.

"Look, " said Roark. "The famous flutings on the the famous columns—what are they there for? To hide the joints in the wood—when columns were made of wood, only these aren't, they're marble. The triglyphs, what are they? Wood. Wooden beams, the way they had to be laid when people began to build wooden shacks. Your Greeks took marble and they made copies of their wooden structures out of it, because others had done it that way. Then your masters of the Renaissance came along and made copies in plaster of copies in marble of copies in wood. Now here we are, making copies in steel and concrete of copies in plaster of copies in marble of copies in wood. Why?"


Now I haven't read the whole thing yet so somethings might be underdeveloped for me. The book revolves around Quatreméres theories on architecture as a sort of language. A very interesting idea and a strikingly good comparison from the arguments I've read in the book. I'll try and give an intro to some of them here.

Quatremére argues that language and architecture evolved parallel to each other. He values the socializing aspects of architecture. He means that society has evolved because of architecture and language's role in it. They catalyze societal improvement in the same way, at least in the origins of language and architecture. I won't dive into the socializing aspects in this post however. The evolution of language and architecture are each separated into two different categories: natural and artificial. Simplified, natural language is the language used in the dawn of humankind to communicate. This language behaves more like sound gestures than words put together into sentences. Natural language describes one's intentions with speech close to it's original sound. Artificial language then evolved through natural language. Artificial language is more abstract in the sense that the meanings of words are constructed rather than mimicking. The word camera has little to do with how a camera sounds.The traces of natural language can be seen in words that are not the exact sound but similar. I'm guessing now but words like splash, click and barf amongst others.

Quatremére argues architecture too evolved this way. He sees the origin of natural architecture in three types: the hut, the cave and the tent. Depending on the cultural origin of a society, he argues that every building can be traced back to that society's architectural type. The hut comes from farming, as sturdy buildings are practical for permanent residency. Caves or temporary lairs work well for hunting and fishing societies, while tents are the type for shepherding and nomadic societies. To give some quick examples:

Egypt - Cave

China - Tent

Greece - Hut

Hut:

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For Greece, which is one of the books main focuses, the natural hut was assembled from tree trunks bound and stabilized upon which a roof could be put on top of the beams. In artificial architecture this then evolved to the entablature and the pediment. The rope binding the trunks together became the classical orders. There is an abstraction here like with the words splash and barf, but the resemblance between the beams used in a hut and the rectangular markings in the entablature is striking.

Pediment:
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Entablature:
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Copying and imitation is discussed in the book as well. A copy of something is according to Quatremére simply put larceny, nothing short of just taking the subject matter at hand and carbon copying it. Trying to get as close to the original as possible. Imitation on the other hand involves abstraction, and is closer to refering than copying. What the greeks did with the hut was not to copy it but too imitate it. And beautifully so. Imitation requires a sort of rationalization of previous forms while copying tries to mimic form as close as possible. Like with natural and artificial language copying is closer to the origin while imitation is more artificial.

With the introduction of type, natural and artificial language and imitation I'd like to quote a few words from page 98 of the book:

For Quatremére, the problem of the relationship between primitive and modern architecture was none other than the process of the transformation of type, a conceptual metamorphosis required each and every time a building was designed. As a result, architecture's past type became

I read this as every epoch further and further abstracts their origin type building. I think Quatreméres observation here is truly astounding. It opens up a new world to me in which analysis of building parts can be traced etymologically to it's origin type.

I think I'll write some more in the future on this book as it helps me solidify the information in it, and there are many more interesting things to share from it. I might elaborate this post too but the clock is getting late in Sweden.

Order it here
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Re: Being-in-the-world [architecture thread]

Postby bels » Wed Feb 15, 2017 7:59 am

My office has metal floors underneath the carpet (I dropped a magnet). Why would you build an office building with ferrous floors? Isn't that ludicrously expensive? I don't think it's just a beam as it seems to be most of the office.

I'm on the ground floor if that makes any difference.
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Re: Being-in-the-world [architecture thread]

Postby pirxthepilot » Wed Feb 15, 2017 9:29 am

^ yeah that's what i was going to say. artist i worked with was once asked to consult on creation of a warning for buried radioactive material that would remain toxic for around 10000 years. Over that timespan it would be reasonable to assume all human language/records could be destroyed/lost. so they had to come up with some kind of 'universal' keep-away that would survive the death of all existing signification.
maybe look around for one of those?

@oucho earlier mexican civilisations loved skulls, used them as ornamentation.

@bels nah. quite the opposite. when she came on board the preferred solution was to scatter a bunch of cds with full explanation around the surface site. you can barely even find a cd player now let alone in 10 millennia
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Re: Being-in-the-world [architecture thread]

Postby sagc » Wed Feb 15, 2017 12:51 pm

This is that document, presumably - an internet classic.
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Re: Being-in-the-world [architecture thread]

Postby pirxthepilot » Wed Feb 15, 2017 1:57 pm

@belsshe was born 67 so might've been a bit young in 1990.possible she was drawing on internet myth just to lead into the idea of 'language without existing signifiers'.. which would fit with her practice anyway. (her work often references john titor etc). that borges-ian slippage we talked about with cameron jamie etc. this is what artists do....(homer/plato/everyone since)

edit: seems fairly obvious this was actually a 'reference' to internet legend that i just didn't get.
do we think this ever happened at all? presumably origins are lost in the mists of internet time?
@jrisk@sagc
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Re: Being-in-the-world [architecture thread]

Postby bels » Wed Feb 15, 2017 6:30 pm

It has an entry on wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waste_Iso ... ure_humans https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long-time ... g_messages so it's probably real (weak citations) but the idea that an interdisciplinary team without an artist would think that they should store the warnings on CDs is pretty laughable. Are artists particularly known for their understanding of data format integrity?

I say it's a waste of money to get an artist on board (I understand the people involved here are dealing with so much money that one artists salary for an entire lifetime is meaningless so why not bring one aboard) because isn't this a project which needs the least amount of art (transformation of symbols or cave shadows or whatever) possible? There may be some evolution induced aversions humans have (though obviously in 10k years we wouldn't know if they still existed because people might be floating roboheads in jars or whatever) but you would almost definitely need science (unbiased, causally isolated observation) to work these out. The idea that one sole artist would have much useful input (outside of relevant book knowledge that you need no artistic ability to synthesise) seems unlikely. And eventually, probably you would discover that as there's not much you could guarantee would warn humans away (because even if you could make a warning, plenty of people will see a warning and walk straight towards it) so you would try to just build something really secure.

What's kind of interesting is that instead of doing the above and leaving it (because really who cares if some guy 9 thousand years from now gets wasted by radioactivity) they make a big deal of assembling an interdisciplinary team to sit and think about the issue and publish magazine articles and DO involve an artist, making it kind of clear that the whole enterprise is actually a kind of art project in the end rather than a real, rigorous attempt to communicate with the future.

Sort of relevant http://longnow.org/clock/
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Re: Being-in-the-world [architecture thread]

Postby pirxthepilot » Wed Feb 15, 2017 6:47 pm

see what you're saying about the artist bit now but i suppose there are figurative cave paintings from 35k-40k years ago so if you were genuinely trying to communicate across many millennia 'art' in the broadest sense has been shown to be some kind of common language (obviously we have no idea what those painters were trying to convey...)
i agree that if the project did even happen it was mostly performative, which as you say is interesting in itself. (although i suspect a lot of govt thinktanks are basically performative anyway)
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Re: Being-in-the-world [architecture thread]

Postby bels » Tue Feb 28, 2017 8:35 am

http://www.cabinetmagazine.org/issues/9/wall.php

Googling red roofs found me this article which is kind of interesting.
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