Art

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Art

Postby smiles » Thu Aug 29, 2013 12:20 pm

Post art and artists that you are interested in. any medium, any time. all is welcome.

I'll start with some older performance art.


marina abramovic, freeing the memory (1976) Marina attempts to recall every words she knows thus freeing her mind. part of a three part series: freeing the body, freeing the memory, and freeing the voice. After performing these pieces, she felt ready to begin her collaboration with Ulay.



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yoko ono, Cut piece (1965)

certainly an flintstone for later performance artists, especially marina. Abramovic's piece Rhythm zero is kind of an extension of yoko's

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Chris Burden, Shoot (1971). this dude is crazy


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Vito Acconci, undertone (1972). This dude is creepy. In a another work titled seedbed. Acconci hid under the floor of a gallery space and masturbated, his moans and mutterings amplified though a microphone and broadcasted to the audience standing above.


cant figure out youtube embed
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby germinal » Thu Aug 29, 2013 12:42 pm

youtube embed: the 11-digit code after the equals sign in the url goes between the [youtube] tags
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby smiles » Fri Aug 30, 2013 8:38 am

Roman Opałka, who painted from one to infinity beginning in 1965. His final number before he died was 5607249

starting in 1968 he took a photograph of himself each day before painting.

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Graham Harwood, London.pl

http://ojs.gc.cuny.edu/index.php/VPP/ar ... /1137/1238
a perl script to:
# Find and calculate the gross lung-capacity of the children screaming from 1792 to the present
# calculate the air displacement needed to represent the public scream
# set PublicAddressSystem intance and transmit the output.
# to do this we approximate that there are 7452520 or so faces that live in the charter'd streets of London.
# Found near where the charter'd Thames does flow.


Heath bunting, communication creates conflict (1995)
users submit phrases which are then printing onto cards and passed out in the tokyo subway station

http://www.irational.org/cybercafe/toky ... let-e.html

people of japan! last nigh I saw a japanese film in Slovenia, Vuk x 250 (vuk cosic, another prominent net.art artist)

Your eyes. Your hands. The way you move your feet.
It's always so nice to see you. To hear your voice. To smell your hair.
Trust me.x 1

ren hang, untitled, 2011
contemporary chinese photographer

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photo from larry clark's tulsa

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Masao Tsuruoka, heavy hands (1949)

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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby germinal » Fri Aug 30, 2013 10:37 am

my favourite thing aboutvthe Roman Opalka canvasses is how with each new canvas he would lighten the background a shade, so that over time the contrast between the numbers and the background would decrease, as if they were slowly fading away. a really beautiful measure of time and life and mortality contained in the canvasses
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby smiles » Fri Aug 30, 2013 10:59 am

ah yeah. Wonder what he was thinking when he started this? I reckon around the time he started changing the background he must have figured out his purpose.

the whole thing seems rather depressing, all he did was paint numbers until he died.

on the other hand, he has quite a concrete legacy. People can look at all his paintings and see that he painted up to 5607249. His life has a number and his value is not abstract like other artists. He doesnt have to prove his importance because its there for everyone to see. The pictures also help to prove the magnitude of it all.

cant really express exactly what i mean. i guess it would be "from 1965 to 2011 roman opalka painted from 1 to 5607249 and no one will ever do the same again"

combines two things i like: rules/restrictions and exploration of time

edit: maybe meaning through magnitude or meaning derived from repetition
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby bels » Sat Aug 31, 2013 4:56 am

I wanna talk about the Ikon Gallery in Birmingham

http://www.ikon-gallery.co.uk/

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It's an old school house in the "rejuvenated" centre of Birmingham. In the canals district which has been yuppified. I've been going there for years, since I was a teenager. There's no permanent collection so it's always something different every three months and I really like things like that. Places where you can go without any expectations and see something you've probably not seen before.

It was the place where I found the work of George Shaw:

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which I think ended up influencing a lot of the photography I did for a while.

I also once went there and saw the work of Anya Gallaccio

She had painted this room with chocolate and it was midsummer, so the chocolate was rotting. It gave off an overpowering sweet smell. Her whole exhibition had a lot of things rotting in it. Looking it up it sounds like someone else has done this chocolate wall painting before but I didn't know that. I don't have a huge opinion on the art itself but I love the fact that there's a place I can go, and I don't necessarily know what's going to be there, but I can go there and experience a room of rotting chocolate. That's an experience that I'd never get anywhere else.

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I think my favourite thing they did was they build a small indonesian tea room inside one of the exhibition halls. You could go there and they had a free jukebox and all you could drink green tea. I can't find anything to do with it online but it was amazing.

Most recently I saw this Shimabuku video exhibition and I thought it was really funny. There's some hits on my instagram:

http://instagram.com/p/dGzMuxDaz9/

http://instagram.com/p/c1YItODa2c/

And just as a finisher, also from my instagram, they have a cool lift:

http://instagram.com/p/c1ZjDbDa4e/
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby Syeknom » Sat Aug 31, 2013 6:28 am

bela wrote:I think my favourite thing they did was they build a small indonesian tea room inside one of the exhibition halls. You could go there and they had a free jukebox and all you could drink green tea. I can't find anything to do with it online but it was amazing.


That sounds so very nice!
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby smiles » Sat Aug 31, 2013 1:08 pm

that chocolate room is awesome.

thanks for contributing (smiling)
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby smiles » Sat Sep 14, 2013 12:09 pm

wu guangzhong, home of man (1999)

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song dong, breathing, 1996
on new years eve, song dong breathed onto tiananmen square for 40 minutes creating a thin layer of ice.

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yayoi kusama creepy phallus things, probably 1960s

to be filed under things that make you uncomfortable.
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chen zhou, character c, installation and performance (2012)
i quite like his mutated furniture

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chow chun fai, Infernal Affairs, "I want my identity back" (2007)

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choi xoo ang, flying hands

extremely creepy sculptures by this guy

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tang kwok hin, One day perhaps there's discovery of that unbeauty | 一天或許會發現這原來不怎麼美麗 , multi channel video installation (2013)

Six kinds of behavior:
1. For pursuit of loneliness and melancholy, is that qualified if I never smoke? Image
2. Facing the wall with no purpose, there’s no single word which can represent except a song. Image
3. As the heart cannot slightly take a rest. Haven’t heard that we need 7 hours to sleep a day? Then I wake up every half an hour. Image
4. To grasp a handful of temperature, though it still drops abruptly. Image
5. Remove the black dot okay? Image
6. Without food for two days, I feel like vomiting however. Image
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby JonjoShelvey » Fri Oct 25, 2013 1:00 am

i like kazimir malevich i want these two tattood on me.

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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby can- » Sun Nov 03, 2013 6:18 pm

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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby sunblam » Sun Nov 03, 2013 7:31 pm

Hello hello! I have been really enjoying these works recently.

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"On the Wall -- Guangzhou (3)," Weng Fen (2002).

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"Bound/Unbound Series," Lin Tianmiao (1996).

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"Kiss," Joey Leung Ka-yin (2012).

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"Land of Elephants," Joey Leung Ka-yin (2012).
Joey Leung is my new baby favorite, and kind of reminds me of Matisse at times, so...

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"Female Nude," Henri Matisse (1907).

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"Male Model," Henri Matisse (c. 1900).

Okok that is probably enough. I feel myself really enjoying this thread in the future (as well as now).
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby smiles » Mon Nov 04, 2013 7:39 am

the figures remind me of yoshimoto nara a bit. quite childish/whimsical

xu bing, Phoenix works (2010?) He has constructed a giant model of a phoenix out of construction detritus

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Zhang Huan,To Raise the Water Level in a Fishpond, 1997, Performance, Beijing, China

That the water in the pond was raised one metre higher is an action of no avail.


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Zhang Huan, 12 square meters, 1994

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This is what he was going to do: He would place himself in the middle of the loo, naked, with some foul-smelling substance and honey covering his body. As a result, a swarm of innumerable flies would stick to his body. He would sit still for an hour.


THE NEXT ONES ARE SHOCKING. DONT LOOK IF YOU DONT WANT TO BE CREEPED OUT. Presented without judgement.

Yang Zhichao, early 2000's performances

The contrast between the nature of his childhood home, and the anonymity and inhumanity of the city is dealt with in 2000’s Iron wherein friend and mentor Ai Wei Wei brands Yang’s passport number into his back, and Planting Grass, a performance of the same year, wherein Yang Zhichao has grass from the Suzhou River surgically implanted into his back, without anesthesia.


Spoiler:
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Zhu Yu, Eating People (2000)

In this 2000 performance, Zhu Yu allegedly cooks the fetus of a stillborn baby and calmly eats it.


Spoiler:
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In Beijing on April 22, 2000, a private exhibition of six artists was held at the Research Institute of Sculpture. The materials used by the artists included both human and animal remains. Although photos and video were forbidden, some photos made it to the public, including an iconic photo of artists Sun Yuan and Peng Yu infusing the corpses of Siamese twin babies with their own blood (Bodies Connected, 2000)


Spoiler:
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby charybdis » Mon Nov 04, 2013 8:28 am

I think I've said this before, but I'm super enamored with Munch's Puberty.

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But I guess I just like paintings with a visceral feel like is Caravaggio of Judith Beheading Holferenes.

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Or this one by Artemisia Gentileschi.

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I saw this photograph by Michael Marcelle in the New Yorker and for some reason the gold watch bands are my favorite part.

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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby Bobbin.Threadbare » Thu Nov 14, 2013 6:10 pm

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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby sknss » Fri Nov 15, 2013 3:05 am

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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby starfox64 » Tue Nov 26, 2013 9:46 am

long new yorker profile of art dealer david zwirner and a general overview of the increasing value of art. i'm not going to post the whole thing because it is 11 pages long.

http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2013/12/02/131202fa_fact_paumgarten?currentPage=all

if you hadn't heard, a painting by francis bacon recently sold for $140 million+ at auction, which is a new record.

http://edition.cnn.com/2013/11/12/us/francis-bacon-painting-art-auction/

it's not mentioned in this cnn article, but apparently the buyer was qatari royal.
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"Authorities say the phony Pope can be recognized by his high-top sneakers and incredibly foul mouth."
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby Syeknom » Wed Dec 04, 2013 5:29 pm

tumblr gif lower-case a-r-t

pixelfucks

Spoiler:
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mr. div

Spoiler:
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby charybdis » Wed Dec 04, 2013 9:15 pm

I like gif art.

STEPHEN VUILLEMIN

Spoiler:
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Rebecca Mock

Spoiler:
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Robin Davey

Spoiler:
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby Bobbin.Threadbare » Wed Dec 04, 2013 9:17 pm

I wish I knew someone who could do this. Katy and I would like it for our project.
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby charybdis » Wed Dec 04, 2013 9:23 pm

I think you could probably easily hire any of the above people.
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby szy » Thu Dec 05, 2013 2:44 am

"Passengers" is the result of an observation Dagmar Keller and Martin Wittwer made at night at a bus station while travelling through Poland.
For a moment, the passengers on an old bus, obscured behind stained, ice-covered windows, in the pale light of the bus station had
the appearance of figures in a painting. Travellers, fallen out of time. Tired, lost in thought, their faces drawn by sadness or flaxy up with joy
– so close and yet distanced behind the glass. Dagmar Keller and Martin Wittwer have preserved those quiet, fleeting moments in their series “Passengers”.

Here are just a few:

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Here's a link to the artist's page http://www.kellerwittwer.de/projects/passengers/,
and here's the rest of the series http://issuu.com/monochrom/docs/1_2091n/1?e=9428020/5849527.
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby sunblam » Thu Dec 05, 2013 4:22 am

Chen Qiulin, "Related" (2004). Common surnames in tofu.
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From "Walking the Cabbage Roaming Diary," Han Bing (2000-).
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I have been greatly enjoying these artists lately.
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby germinal » Thu Dec 05, 2013 8:41 am

reminds me of Tokyo Compression by Michael Wolf, szy
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His portraits are of commuters travelling on the Tokyo subway, crammed behind glass and steel whilst pressed uncomfortably against fellow travellers. The concept of photographing people on the subway isn't new within photography however the angle Wolf has taken certainly is. The intense pictures show commuters with their faces pressed up against windows fogged with condensation and reveal the innate craziness that is part of so many people's daily lives.
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby szy » Thu Dec 05, 2013 11:48 am

Here's what I think about this germ:

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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby exprof » Wed Dec 18, 2013 10:09 pm

[vimeo]http://vimeo.com/15108251[/vimeo]

The eCLOUD is a dynamic sculpture inspired by the volume and behavior of an idealized cloud. Made from unique polycarbonate tiles that can fade between transparent and opaque states, its patterns are transformed periodically by real time weather from around the world.
It is a permanent sculpture between gates 22 and 23 at the San Jose International Airport and was a collaboration between Dan Goods, Nik Hafermaas, and Aaron Koblin.
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby ddd » Wed Dec 18, 2013 11:43 pm

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franz von stuck

reminded of this when i saw the beheading of holofernes posted by dwindles
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby sunblam » Thu Dec 19, 2013 3:21 am

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"Harp," Yin Xiuzhen (1995).
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby germinal » Wed Jan 08, 2014 11:33 am

i enjoyed this

Tricky Business: Defining Authenticity
Guggenheim Project Confronts Conceptual Art’s Nature


By RANDY KENNEDY

Published: December 20, 2013


WHEN the Guggenheim Museum sold pieces by Kandinsky, Chagall and Modigliani in the early 1990s to help it buy one of the world’s most important collections of Minimalist and Conceptual art, it knew it was paying not only for hundreds of seminal works but also for a mare’s nest of problems.

And many of those problems went straight to the heart of the kinds of questions asked by the challenging work itself, made in the 1960s and ’70s by pioneers like Donald Judd, Dan Flavin and Robert Morris. What was the meaning of authenticity in art? Did artists have to make art themselves? Could copies by the artists or others be as “authentic” as originals?

Could an artist — as Mr. Morris did when angered by the architect Philip Johnson’s delinquency in paying for a sculpture — simply write that he was taking back “all aesthetic quality” from the work, rendering it a worthless hunk of metal and wood? (Both the Morris sculpture and the conceptual dunning letter now reside in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, showing how history sometimes sorts through such questions by itself.)

The issues confronted by the Guggenheim were aesthetic and philosophical but also legal and starkly practical: Would the museum ever be able to show some of these pieces bought from Count Giuseppe Panza di Biumo, a visionary Italian collector of postwar art? Or did Panza, who sometimes saw himself as an artistic collaborator and who fabricated some works from artists’ plans, go too far in substituting his own ideas for those of the exacting artists he collected, creating illegitimate art? Could some works — deemed legitimate but too damaged through time ever to show — be remade by the museum or the artists and replace the older ones?

“The work poses deep philosophical and aesthetic issues that will not soon be resolved,” Michael Govan, then a deputy Guggenheim director, said in 1990. “We won’t do it all in four weeks.”

It has taken, indeed, more than two decades. But since 2010 the Guggenheim has been quietly engaged in one of the most ambitious conservation projects ever to address the deep uncertainties raised by Minimalism and Conceptualism, which brought highly unconventional materials — plywood, hardware, industrial metals — and even more unconventional ideas to art, questioning the importance of objects and of the artist’s hand. Some answers the project is now reaching will be surprising: that, for example, the most responsible act of conservation might be the destruction of a piece of art because, in the final analysis, it is not really a piece of art.

The project’s stakes have been evident in its financing alone: two grants totaling almost $2.5 million from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for an initiative that will continue for more than another year. And its conclusions — being reached after meetings of more than a hundred fellow conservators, curators, scholars, lawyers, and some of the living artists — will undoubtedly reverberate far beyond the Guggenheim’s walls, to other museums, and to galleries and auction houses.

“These questions are being asked by everybody now, by every collector and museum that has work from this pivotal generation,” said Jeffrey Weiss, the Guggenheim’s senior curator in charge of the Panza Collection. “But decisions tend to be made individually. We don’t talk to each other about these things nearly enough. And the terms set out by this work are a frontier only now being explored.”

Over the last year and a half, the museum invited a reporter to observe, as long unseen pieces by Mr. Morris, Bruce Nauman, Lawrence Weiner, Judd (who died in 1994) and Flavin (who died in 1996) were taken from storage and debated — sometimes, in a sense, as defendants on trial for their lives — in spaces at the Brooklyn Navy Yard and at the Guggenheim. In private, Mr. Weiss and Francesca Esmay, the museum’s conservator for the Panza Collection, spent dozens of hours interviewing Mr. Weiner, whose works exist mostly as words painted on walls, and Mr. Morris, a highly private artist who has argued that there are no originals to his works, only ideas that can be refabricated as needed.

Always, in the background, were the words left behind by the artists no longer around to defend their work. In particular there were the words of Judd, who broke angrily and publicly with Panza at the time of the sale to the Guggenheim, in a long essay in which he accused the collector of making his signature boxlike works from Judd’s plans but without his approval, incorrectly and with inferior materials. “Panza doesn’t care,” he wrote. “What I require is too expensive. Consequently, Panza makes mock-ups, fakes.”

Judd was among a wave of postwar artists to introduce the idea of industrial fabrication — the removal of the artist’s hand — to the conception of art. And most of his best-known geometric objects, in plywood, metal and other materials, were made by specialty craftsmen. But this hands-off delegation, far from distancing him from the work, seemed only to deepen his control, one of many facts that Panza, who died in 2010, failed to grasp, Judd said. (Many artists also complained that Panza underpaid for their work.)

“His understanding of my work was simply shady,” Judd wrote, “either genuinely and superficially wrong or conveniently wrong, since his misunderstanding allowed him to build as he pleased.” One recent afternoon in a private gallery at the Guggenheim, Mr. Weiss, Ms. Esmay and Ted Mann, an assistant curator working on the project, examined several examples of Judd works made by Panza and not seen by the public since the collection came to the museum. While the boxlike works closely resembled Judd pieces, the differences — in the look of the plywood, the way the panels were assembled, even in the screws used — made some appear more like nonfunctional furniture than like the highly specific work Judd made.

“If he were alive today to see this,” Ms. Esmay said, looking at one work.

“He would die,” Mr. Weiss said.

Ms. Esmay added, “These stand not only as an incredible demonstration of what not to do but a demonstration of the quality of Judd’s authentic work.”

While the fate of the Panza works has not been fully decided, there is now little likelihood that they will ever be shown at the Guggenheim. “It’s very, very difficult to argue,” Mr. Weiss said later, “that works that an artist disavowed can ever be successfully fought for.” Even the question of whether the works will be kept for their historical value is fraught; many Judd partisans would like to see them destroyed because of fears they might be shown as legitimate at some point.

But Mr. Weiss said they might be saved. “They were shown by Panza, and they were taken to be Judds by a lot of people over many years,” he said. “So I think they have a historical role of some sort in the transmission of Judd’s works.”

The number of contested works by Judd and others in the collection represents a small fraction of the whole, and by any measure — art historical, curatorial, financial — the acquisition, which cost the museum more than $30 million, now stands as a remarkably prescient decision by the Guggenheim. (On the market today, the works would cost the museum many times what it paid then.) But the problems have continued to loom large, in part because they force the museum and others around the world to come to terms with work that questions ideas underpinning the very existence of museums themselves.

“It’s tough,” said Virginia Rutledge, an art lawyer who advised the project. “It is about the very human desire to value something created by someone at a certain point in history but also to honor what that person wants or wanted.”

The conflicts between objects and artists that the Panza Collection provoked were very raw in the early days, said Mr. Govan, now the director of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art: “That’s how I got to know a lot of those artists — under duress, because they were all mad.”

“But as time goes on, that’s no longer going to be the story,” he said and added that Panza’s role as promoter and protector of the work of a crucial era should not be overshadowed by the problems. “It’s hard for us to imagine now how radical this work was, and he was light years ahead.”

For all the drama surrounding the Judd questions, those regarding Mr. Morris, 82, plunge far deeper into the murky territory of their time. One of Mr. Morris’s signature works, “Untitled (Corner Piece)” from 1964, a flat-gray triangular mass that seems to float snug in a corner, was shown in a show at Richard Bellamy’s Green Gallery on West 57th Street in Manhattan. The piece, made of plywood, was subsequently thrown away, a fate met by many Morris works from those days, because he believed the objects could — and should — be remade and were secondary to the ideas they embodied. The piece was later remade by Mr. Morris in gray fiberglass and sold to Panza. But it came to the Guggenheim badly damaged, with cracks, screw holes and discolorations.

The piece — which Mr. Weiss called “a complicated little sucker” — also came loaded with questions of what it was, exactly. An exhibition copy? A historical refabrication? In long, philosophical, often contradictory discussions with Mr. Morris, the questions were: Should the piece be remade? And if so, how? The Robert Morris of the 1960s most likely would have absented himself from any such debate about objects and materials. But Mr. Morris’s view about the physical importance of his works had changed over the years, and he came to favor remaking the corner piece in the original plywood, which the Guggenheim’s fabrication shop has done.

And so the next time the work is seen in an exhibition, it will be the 2013 iteration of a 1964 piece, with — or maybe without — a label telling viewers that it has been remade. The older work will probably be kept for study purposes, but several Morris pieces made by Panza without the artist’s involvement will most likely be destroyed and refabricated.

“People are always asking us, ‘What does the artist want?’ — as if that’s a simple, monolithic thing,” Mr. Weiss said. “It turns out that it’s one of the most complicated parts of the whole process. It’s not just him and us. It’s the changing him and the informed us.”

“And no matter how we try to deny it,” he added, “the tug of history is always very strong.”


http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/22/arts/ ... ature.html
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby areo » Wed Jan 08, 2014 1:11 pm

^ nice! Thierry de Duve wrote a good essay about Kant & Minimalism which used Morris' Corner Piece as it's main example; I can't find the essay online but he seems to have done a lecture with the same title that's available to view here and should be fun to watch -
http://vimeo.com/74882092

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