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Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Wed Jan 08, 2014 7:40 pm
by rublev
Soutine
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Gauguin
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Modigliani
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/// and some more recent things i've snapped at galleries:

Thea Djordjadze
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Elmar Trenkwalder
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There's lots more but i don't want to make everyone wait for my photos to load...

Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Mon Jan 13, 2014 1:52 pm
by rublev
Can we post our own stuff here? Or is there somewhere else for that? Here is some of mine...

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Mix of paint / chalk / other scraps of material etc

Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Mon Jan 13, 2014 4:55 pm
by sknss
Very nice, where do you find flintstone?

Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Mon Jan 13, 2014 6:18 pm
by rublev
Thank you! I find that question quite difficult to answer. I feel like i get it everywhere and nowhere?????

Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Sat Jan 18, 2014 2:52 pm
by parastexis
Thought I'd post some of mine as well, though I think maybe a new thread would be better. More illustration than art

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Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Sat Jan 18, 2014 7:25 pm
by jrisk
Very inspiring stuff parastexis, i'd love to hear more about the first two there.

Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Wed Jan 22, 2014 11:16 am
by rublev
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clay, oil paint, foil

Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2014 2:05 pm
by rublev
The Triumph of Death by Pieter Bruegel the Elder:

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You can view and zoom in on a good quality picture here (it's worth it).

"The painting shows a panorama of an army of skeletons wreaking havoc across a blackened, desolate landscape. Fires burn in the distance, and the sea is littered with shipwrecks. A few leafless trees stud hills otherwise bare of vegetation; fish lie rotting on the shores of a corpse-choked pond. Art historian James Snyder emphasizes the scorched, barren earth, devoid of any life as far as the eye can see. In this setting, legions of skeletons advance on the living, who either flee in terror or try in vain to fight back. In the foreground, skeletons haul a wagon full of skulls; in the upper left corner, others ring the bell that signifies the death knell of the world. A fool plays the lute while a skeleton behind him plays along; a starving dog nibbles at the face of a child; a cross sits in the center of the painting. People are herded into a trap decorated with crosses, while a skeleton on horseback kills people with a scythe. The painting depicts people of different social backgrounds – from peasants and soldiers to nobles as well as a king and a cardinal – being taken by death indiscriminately.

A skeleton parodies human happiness by playing a hurdy-gurdy while the wheels of his cart crush a man. A woman has fallen in the path of the death cart; she holds in her hand a spindle and distaff, classical symbols of the fragility of human life. The slender thread is about to be cut by the scissors in her other hand. Just below her a cardinal is helped towards his fate by a skeleton who mockingly wears the red hat, while a dying king's barrel of gold coins is looted by yet another skeleton. In one detail, a dinner has been broken up and the diners are putting up a futile resistance. They have drawn their swords in order to fight the skeletons dressed in winding-sheets; no less hopelessly, the jester takes refuge beneath the dinner table. The backgammon board and the playing cards have been scattered, while a skeleton thinly disguised with a mask empties away the wine flasks. Above, a woman is being embraced by a skeleton in a hideous parody of after-dinner amorousness. Of the menu of the interrupted meal, all that can be seen are a few pallid rolls of bread and an appetizer apparently consisting of a pared human skull. As the fighting breaks out, a skeleton in a hooded robe mockingly seems to bring another dish, also consisting of human bones, to the table.
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If you pass all the misery and death, right at the back of the painting, past the gallows and near the rising smoke, two skeletons appear to look toward the horizon and wave.

Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Thu Feb 13, 2014 12:47 pm
by ramseames
http://www.momat.go.jp/english/artmuseum/tetsumi_kudo/index.html

Went and saw this today. Had zero prior experience with his body of work so I didn't know what to expect, but even if I had known what I was getting into I think I still would have found it a bit shocking. You look at one of his pieces in a photo and its unpleasant, but there's something much more distinctly uncomfortable about being in a white gallery room full of them. The textural elements in particular just didn't sit well with me at all. But all of this is a good thing, made for a very memorable experience and got some of the intended meanings across, if bluntly, in a way I don't think I've ever experienced before with visual art.

A philosophy of impotence:
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Tue Feb 25, 2014 7:08 pm
by rublev
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Wed Feb 26, 2014 9:03 am
by iamacyborg
Saw the artist (Quayola) who exhibited and talked about this work recently. Really cool stuff.

[vimeo]http://www.vimeo.com/76977227[/vimeo]

Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Sat Mar 01, 2014 8:09 pm
by bels
@rublev Why did Bruegel paint that painting. Was he just trying to bum people out. Also what do you mean "You don't think" ?

Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2014 1:12 am
by sunblam
I saw "The Enclave" (2012-2013) by Richard Mosse today, and it was really just sort of astounding. I would highly recommend seeing it if you can. The following are some stills from the 39-minute film installation.

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Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2014 12:52 pm
by rublev
Well Bela that is an interesting question. Not much is know about Bruegel which is surprising considering how popular he is so his motivation behind that painting is unknown. I do not know if Bruegel was a religious man, but like many other medieval and renaissance painters, death, its inevitability... and i suppose here its creativity, seems to be the first point of call thematically. Indeed, i believe this picture hangs opposite Bosch's the garden of earthly delights in Madrid. If i may digress, i like to think that this painting, while perhaps on first view having religious connotations, is actually one of the futility of religion. A cry of the secular! Arise thy humanist! No redemption, no salvation, no hope! Leave your cross at home! A nihilist claims this brush and palette. Pondering further, perhaps it would be better to view this as an early form of anti war propaganda? The futility of war? After all, it was painted during the Spanish religious crusade / campaign against Protestants throughout Holland and the low countries, where there was little in the way of women and children being spared from the horrors of battle. What are these... horrors of the battle...? Horrors of war? War destroys all, taking the earth and its people into a darkness that is both uncompromising and hollow.

Thank you that concludes art history 1034 next week please remember to read chapters 8 - 10 of my new book entitled 'why i don't paint' available all good bookstores goodbye.

Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2014 12:56 pm
by rublev
:heck:

Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2014 4:08 am
by verilyvert
I recently saw an exhibit of photographs by Edward Burtynsky titled "A Terrible Beauty". The exhibit was a study on human altered landscapes. Having gone to school for resource extraction, and after working in various industrial settings, I found I related closely to the images. The ideas of inhabiting nature, altering it, and finally abandoning it, resonated strongly with me. The photography and printing is beautiful, and the content sobering.

Some of Burtynsky's photographs.
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Here is Burtynsky giving a Ted Talks, and discussing his work much better than I can here.
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Sun Mar 23, 2014 10:00 pm
by paf
Last month, Yola Monakhov, a photographer, showed some of her work in the gallery space at my school, including a few photos from this really cool project she did called "Exposed by Postal Service". For this project, she essentially turned packages into pinhole cameras and mailed them from her local post office to her home, with the film inside being exposed for the entire trip. It had to be such a short distance because the film would get crazy over-exposed, even with ND filters layered on thick, when she tried to send them longer distances.

Here are a few cool ones:
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(You can view the entire project here)

Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Tue Mar 25, 2014 2:41 pm
by iamacyborg
I love Gregory Crewdson's photography.

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Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Tue Mar 25, 2014 4:18 pm
by vgtbls
I really love Cy Twombly's art. I found him in the Philadelphia Museum of Art and he's stuck with me ever since.

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Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Tue Mar 25, 2014 4:52 pm
by hooplah
yes, i love cy

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my favorite painter is david

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Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Tue Mar 25, 2014 7:43 pm
by deadkitty
Assorted things I've been enjoying recently:

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Marina Abramovic - Rest Energy (1980)

Rhythm 0 and Rest Energy were the most difficult pieces in my entire life of performance artist, because in both pieces I was not in charge. In Rest Energy we actually held an arrow on the weight of our bodies, and the arrow is pointed right into my heart. We had two small microphones near our hearts, so we could hear our heartbeats. As our performance was progressing, heartbeats were becoming more and more intense, and though it lasted just four minutes and ten seconds, I’m telling you, for me it was forever. It was a performance about the complete and total trust.


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Walead Beshty - The Phenomenology of Shopping (2001)

Phenomenology of Shopping is my engagement with the mall structures in the dumbest way possible. That is: “Where does my body fit?” And so it does combine with the idea of détournement and dérive, always engaging directly with its object, but in an absurdist way. What the images show is my body inserted into these sets of display architecture, which are almost like pictures themselves in the sense that they ‘re objects meant exclusively to be looked at. One way to deal with a façade is to put weight on it, literally. I always thought of this work as performative, because when considered solely as photographs, they really aren’t all that interesting. It was the act that structured that work.


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Leap into the Void - Yves Klein (1960)

I find this one really interesting because the photograph was meant to represent a leap into this zen-like state of "The Void" that Klein had talked about quite a bit and despite this it was (ironically) created in this super contrived process where he had to combine two negatives - one of him jumping onto a tarp that a bunch of people were holding and one of the background by itself. Also because Klein tried to use it to prove that he could fly and printed a bunch of fake newspapers to commemorate.

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David Hockney - Ian Washing His Hair (1980)

Interesting how Hockney deals with representing passage of time through still photographs. Almost Cubist in a way.

Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Fri Apr 18, 2014 12:33 pm
by rublev
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Fri Apr 18, 2014 2:09 pm
by kraftflag
One of my favorite contemporary painters at the moment:

Kon Trubkovich

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Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2014 7:50 pm
by exprof
eva hesse's work really resonates with me. her rope work is my favourite.

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Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2014 8:21 pm
by oucho
i used to make really lame 'illustrations'
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then i made lame collages
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2014 8:54 pm
by oldtrailmix
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The King walked in any weather.

Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2014 3:24 am
by smrk
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Emil Nolde - Lake Lucerne (c. 1930, watercolor on Japanese vellum, 34o x 470 mm)

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Hiroshi Yoshida - Grand Canyon (1925)

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Gustav Klimt - Pine Forest (1901)

Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2014 6:19 am
by rublev
Can't wait to see this Franz Erhard Walther exhibition at Wiels in Brussels in a couple of weeks

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:woop:

Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2014 1:50 pm
by oucho
andy warhol pixel art lol
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

PostPosted: Fri May 09, 2014 7:07 pm
by exprof
Love Sol Lewitt.

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