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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby rjbman » Sat Jul 26, 2014 11:13 pm

Re: mirrors, I don't think it's a post-selfie thing. The exhibit I went to had plenty of mirrors that were pre-21st century. I don't claim to have a good concept of art but I'd like to think it has to do with the introspective thoughts people tend to have upon seeing themselves. blah blah something about artists trying to show an insight into viewers' inner self, and mirrors being an easy way of accomplishing that.

I want to make an exhibit of polaroids consisting of people seeing candid pictures of them and their reactions, because I think that that first moment of seeing yourself in a new way would be really intriguing.
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby stappard_ » Tue Jul 29, 2014 8:20 am

Roman Opalka

In 1965, in his studio in Warsaw, Opałka began painting numbers from one to infinity. Starting in the top left-hand corner of the canvas and finishing in the bottom right-hand corner, the tiny numbers were painted in horizontal rows. Each new canvas, which the artist called a 'detail', took up counting where the last left off. Each 'detail' is the same size (196 x 135 cm), the dimension of his studio door in Warsaw. All details have the same title, "1965 / 1 – ∞"; the project had no definable end, and the artist pledged his life to its ongoing execution: 'All my work is a single thing, the description from number one to infinity. A single thing, a single life', 'the problem is that we are, and are about not to be'. He had contemplated and tried many different ways to visualize time before settling on this life's work.


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Over the years there were changes to the process. In Opałka's first details he painted white numbers onto a black background. In 1968 he changed to a grey background 'because it's not a symbolic colour, nor an emotional one', and in 1972 he decided he would gradually lighten this grey background by adding 1 per cent more white to the ground with each passing detail. He expected to be painting virtually in white on white by the time he reached 7777777 (He did not use commas or number breaks in the works): 'My objective is to get up to the white on white and still be alive.' As of July 2004, he had reached 5.5 million.


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Opałka lived in Teille, near Le Mans, and Venice. He died at age 79 after falling ill while on holiday in Italy. He was admitted to a hospital near Rome and died there a few days later, on August 6, 2011, three weeks before his 80th birthday. The final number he painted was 5607249.



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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby chadnik » Thu Jul 31, 2014 4:37 pm

Jennifer Crupi makes some incredible wearable art centered around gesture. They've got a strong flavor of masochism and constraint—I can't imagine actually wearing these for any extended length of time. I like how the cyborg aesthetic collides with the gestures the pieces force in her "Ornamental Hands" series—very mannered sorts of positions like you might see in classical Greek sculpture (first three photos). Her "Unguarded Gestures" series (last two photos) does something of the opposite, by taking everyday casual gestures and snapping them into rigid position.

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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby rublev » Fri Aug 01, 2014 1:41 pm

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Born in 1974 in France, Isabelle Cornaro lives and works in Paris and Berlin. Cornaro uses a range of media including drawing, photography, video and, more recently, installation. Her works often reference animated films, iconic landscape design and exhibition views, sourced from historical and cultural archives. Her practice counter-intuitively employs a conceptual approach to investigate the ways in which objects and artworks are propped up, animated and fetishized. Cornaro’s constructed arrangements abstract and schematize familiar objects specifically selected for their sentimental or symbolic value, as a means of triggering a semiotic reading of these objects as opposed to an affected sense of recognition. Informed by the notions of the gaze and the screen, Cornaro’s works recurrently dramatize pictorial systems, such as the classical rules of perspective, to critically reflect upon their involvement in ideological constructions of space.
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby MxmHrpr » Mon Aug 25, 2014 7:42 am

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New work from Olafur Eliasson: he installed a riverbed in the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art in Denmark. (via Kottke)
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby exprof » Mon Aug 25, 2014 5:12 pm

Oh speaking of water installations:

Bridge by Micheal Cross

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In september 2006 Michael Cross showed the first stage prototype of this epic project in Dilston Grove, south-east London. The Bridge is a series of steps which rise up out of the water in front of you as you walk from one to the next, and then disappear back underneath behind you as you go, leaving you stranded with only one step visible in front of you, and one behind. The bridge ends in the middle of the water, where you find yourself totally isolated and cut off from the shore. You return the way you came. The mixed feelings of peace, isolation, relaxation and fear that the piece elicits are powerful. The project is on-going will ultimately lead to a permanent installation in a lake.
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby deadkitty » Mon Aug 25, 2014 5:21 pm

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Spoiler:

Rolf Aamot - Digital Photopaintings

(By Professor Øivind Storm Bjerke)

Rolf Aamot has always been a restless and experimental artist who in particular has

realized the potential of developing his figurative language through the use of technological

innovations. The technological side of his art alone could form the subject

of an entire study. Technique has never been his goal, however; rather it has been

a means of creating images. Rolf Aamot has been an active artist for almost fifty

years. His first major work was a commission to decorate the Museum of Paleontology

in Oslo, which he concluded in 1955, the same year that he graduated from

the Norwegian Academy of Art, Crafts and Design. During his time at the Academy,

which he attended from 1958 until 1960, Rolf Aamot studied under Aage Storstein

and Alexander Schultz - two painters whose roots can be traced to the efforts of

the 1920s to unite figuration and abstraction under the impression of cubism and

neoclassicism. In other words, Aamot had a very traditional academy education.

Aamot began his career as an artist at a time when young innovative pictorial

artists perceived themselves - and were perceived by the general public - as messengers

for abstract painting. That is, abstract painting as it emerged in contemporary

France. These painters paved the way for the evolution of three different

directions: lyrical abstraction in painting, constructivist painting and spontaneous

informalism. Irrespective of the choices made by individual artists, there was general

consensus among them that images were two-dimensional and that everything

in a picture was on one plane. Respect for the fact that an image was flat became

a central issue. A successful picture is initially a decorative pattern on one plane,

before it appears as anything else - e.g. a tree. A successful picture forms a visual

whole consisting of material, color and shape which confirm the image’s two

dimensions. Contemporary paintings were essentially decorative paintings that

sought an ornamental expression. Illusionism was the domain of photography.

Even within the field of photography, the tendency has been that photography in

the 1950s and 1960s that wished to appear as ”artistic” noticeably attempted to

arrange a motif on the surface, so that a picture appears as though it attempts

to represent an arrangement of surface figures. Light and dark are transformed

into abstract patterns and appear as though their intention was to fulfill a compositional

form taken from a recipe book describing good composition in paintings.

It is remarkable in any case how such a great deal of photography that has regarded

itself as ”artistic” has for long periods of time endeavored to capture sections of

motifs and carry out cropping, which results in the picture appearing to be a harmonious

entity where the format of the picture that is perceived of as a surface

is confirmed, whereas amateur photography to a far greater degree perceives the

motif as action in space. We can see this as the result of the fact that throughout

the period during which photographs have been taken the goal of the most prestigious

artistic technique until recently - painting - has been to address the surface.

In his later artistic career, Aamot has moved in the opposite direction of creating

images that are flat. On the contrary, Rolf Aamot has been concerned with creating

space. In particular, this has made it difficult to pigeonhole him in relation to

his contemporaries. Aamot’s imagery emerges in an environment where there

are dominant references to art history, which to some extent can be claimed

to conflict with the content of the ideas that the artist wishes to communicate.

If we use the term ”photography” in its literal sense as ”drawing with

light”, then Rolf Aamot has been a photographer who has seldom or never

been associated with photography. He is an artist who for almost 40 years

has been in the forefront when it comes to experimenting with photo-based

forms of visual expression within fields such as film, video and electronic

art, which he has materialized in the form of individual images produced

as laser paintings and now also as conventional chemical photography.

Aamot’s pictures raise our level of awareness, through their accentuation

of space, that photography is an art form that is linked in equal measure

to performance art such as the theatre as it is to paintings.

In 1969, Rolf Aamot presented his works at the Munch Museum, where he

applied the term ”visual theatre” to his work. On 24 February 1969, in a

full-page spread in VG, the Norwegian national daily, it was announced that

a new theatre had been founded in Oslo: ”The Visual Theatre, instigated by

the ”never-resting graphic artist and painter Rolf Aamot, 34, a campaigner for

the artistic use of our mass media such as film, television and newspapers”.

According to Rolf Aamot, the basis of ”visual theatre” is that our existence is not

linear and that life and art fuse to form one entity. The artist’s task is to ”program

so that the onlooker can be faced with choice, and thus take a creative role”.

Aamot wanted to bring people back to art. Not in the form of figures taken from baroque

paintings, from the romantic period or contemporary modernistic figurative

painting. For Aamot, art is not a means with which to decorate, be it for everyday use

or for festive occasions; rather it is a means of recognition and acknowledgement.

Aamot has chosen to focus on two aspects of recognition: social and political

aspects. In his art, people return in the form of these two dimensions. Art should

be returned to the people and people should be in art. The best way he as an

artist can reach out to the people is through the mass media, since the mass media

is the most effective and decisive system in our time for reaching out to people

- and thus a network that forms a spider’s web that captures unsuspecting visitors.

Of key importance in Rolf Aamot’s world of ideas are knowledge of how the

media exploit images and the visual dramaturgy they use to achieve their goals.

According to Rolf Aamot, good forms of media distinguish between ”I” and ”we”

- they offer a sense of belonging, proximity and intensity, while at the same time

respecting individuality and multiplicity. The ideal is to produce a social space that

allows both individual and collective autonomy using dialogues as the ideal form of

communication. ”Interaction in social space has been the forte of the labor movement

” (Aamot). For Aamot, culture is interaction and the art he seeks to produce

is art that fosters and strengthens interaction. Aamot believes that modern mass

media represent new public spaces and the powers that be seek to gain power over

this public space. Anyone who today seeks power seeks to control the media. In

this perspective, Aamot’s artistic project appears as an attempt to counter power.

Aamot’s pictures contain no mottoes, no figurations that we can identify directly with

political figures, events or current affairs - yet his entire artistic practice is deeply political.

In 1966, Rolf Aamot recorded the first ”music video” on Norwegian television -

using music composed by Arne Nordheim. At the time of its broadcast one year later,

it was the first time television had been used as an independent artistic medium.

Art needs to be included in the task of creating our total environment. The places

people meet and are attracted to each other and repelled from one another appear

as stages where the visual theatre unfolds. It is a dialogue theatre, where the dialogue

can be read not in the form of verbal statements, but in the form of

visually available shapes and colors. In this theatre what is most important

is vision and what one senses through vision. It’s not that strange that Rolf

Aamot has never received a central position in contemporary art, considering

that the dominant trend right from the 1960s has been to deconstruct and

to give less priority to vision in deference to words and their power.

Rolf Aamot’s own contribution to this genre was his visual music. His visual music

consisted of visual tones formed through the mechanical and electronic processing

of light. Aamot has experimented with light and movement and

how the interaction of these two components can be crystallized in the

form of an image. Aamot’s pictures in the form of laser painting, film and photographs

can best be perceived as presentations of an electronic foundation

that forms scores that can be presented in several different ways.

Rolf Aamot’s pictures have an expression that is enticingly beautiful. The reason

why we perceive Aamot’s images as being beautiful in the conventional sense has

to do with the fact that his artistic style can be related to a generational style

which we associate with the abstract paintings of the 1950s and 1960s. If one

gets bogged down in these references as a background for understanding the

pictures, however, one will often miss out on the fact that behind this visual

expression Aamot has quite another frame of reference, one that breaks radically

with many ideals on which the Parisian school of abstract painting was based.

Øivind Storm Bjerke
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby rublev » Wed Aug 27, 2014 4:41 pm

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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby rublev » Sat Sep 06, 2014 2:20 pm

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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby Syeknom » Fri Sep 19, 2014 7:22 pm

Art Market | Big in Belgium

With cheap spaces, a friendly scene and a thoughtful audience, the once sleepy Brussels arts scene is making some noise.

“It’s really hard to put your finger on it,” Katerina Gregos told me. We were sitting in a coffee shop in a residential neighborhood on the south side of Brussels; it was an overcast Sunday afternoon. Gregos, a Greek woman with a British education, is the new artistic director of Art Brussels, the city’s contemporary art fair, and she was struggling to explain the specific appeal of her adoptive city. Outside, the streets were empty. On my way to meet her I had passed blocks that looked like a two-thirds scale model of Paris, and others that looked as Dutch as Amsterdam. “You can’t really describe what Brussels is, because Brussels doesn’t announce itself with an image,” she said. “It’s a place where things are quite hidden. It’s a city that’s in a perpetual state of becoming.”

Still, what the place is becoming, and especially what its art world is becoming, is, as she pointed out, curiously difficult to say. It is not becoming New York or London or Paris or Berlin. Brussels exists in defiance of the hype and gaudiness of those cities, not to mention the cost; Paris, several people told me, with evident satisfaction, is three times as expensive to live in. The art fair that Gregos guides is changing (she wants it to be less of a yard sale and more coherent), but it isn’t growing. The collectors are buying, but mostly work by younger, more difficult artists. It’s not a celebrity scene: a Jeff Koons show at Almine Rech Gallery last year (his first solo exhibition in town since 1992) was met with amusement and slight puzzlement, not because the work wasn’t good, but because the market ambition of such an extravaganza was so out of keeping with the spirit of the city. Young people are moving in, but more, it seems, to avoid a scene than to make one. The kids have their bars and parties, but for anyone who’s reached the age where work starts to solidify, Brussels offers the very opposite: cheap space, solitude and a thoughtful audience. I asked Jan Mot, who’s had a small gallery in town since 1996, if a community of artists had started to come together. “No. No. No,” he said, cheerfully. “The atmosphere is very amicable, but it’s still a group of a lot of individuals.”

Just so: It’s a mostly French city (technically, Walloon) within a Dutch region (technically, Flemish); proud of its eccentricities but unsure of its own identity, which is so undefined that there’s no single word for “someone who lives in Brussels.” It is a private place, resistant and rather matter-of-fact in its demeanor, perfectly happy to get along with whatever might come along, and to do without whatever doesn’t — a Bartleby of a city. It’s also home to a brainy, theoretical art scene with little matching press to express the artists’ thoughts, or critics to evaluate the results. There are galleries and exhibition spaces, and family collections open to the public, but a paucity of first-rate museums.

At the same time, the place is gaining cultural power. As the center of German art moved east, from Cologne and Düsseldorf to Berlin and Leipzig, a kind of vacuum appeared in the region. Low rent, wealthy collectors and accessibility to the rest of the continent has induced Brussels to fill it, though more or less by default: it’s a city in the middle of everything and at the center of nothing. Almine Rech-Picasso (she’s married to one of the artist’s grandsons) moved from Paris in 2006, bringing with her a branch of her deluxe and well-established gallery. A couple of years later, Barbara Gladstone, one of the most formidable of New York dealers, opened up a space in a converted town house. Both have used their spaces to showcase lesser-known artists — Matthias Bitzer, R. H. Quaytman — as well as established figures like Franz West and Marisa Merz. Both seem to have been brought to Brussels as much by convenience as by the possibility of staking a claim in a new land. “The Belgium system is more flexible than the French,” Rech-Picasso told me. “It’s a more easygoing city than many cities in Europe.” But there was a sense of slowing down and gathering in, too. “If you had asked me 15 years ago if I would move to Brussels, I would have said you were crazy,” she said. “It’s a very strange time. Europe is psychoanalyzing itself: What should we do? Which way should we go?” In fact, a number of wealthy French families are going to Brussels, where taxes on investment income are very low — and nonexistent on profits made from flipping artworks.

Rech-Picasso and Gladstone arrived in a city with a pack of established galleries, some large and some small: Jan Mot, Catherine Bastide, Xavier Hufkens, Rodolphe Janssen, each of which shows an easy mix of American and European artists. At the same time, a collection of younger, more experimental spaces has opened. Rodolphe’s younger brother, Sébastien, opened a storefront installation space — essentially a window-display-size cube with a tiny gallery behind it — called Sorry We’re Closed, with a program as eccentric as its name. Galerie VidalCuglietta opened in the trendy Dansaert district, featuring emerging international artists like Emily Sundblad and Amy Granat; the Brooklyn gallery Clearing added a satellite on Brussels’s grand boulevard, Avenue Louise. Why? For one thing, Paris, London and Berlin are only an hour or two away: during the five days I spent in Brussels, half the people I wanted to speak to were either leaving for or arriving from one or the other. For another, Belgian collectors are exceptionally well regarded. “They stay interested from a really young age to an end of an artist’s career,” Clearing’s co-director Barthélémy Schöller told me. “You have good conversation with them, they know their history, and they know their art. They aren’t just interested in Belgian art. They’re really international — they’ll buy Fred Sandback alongside Luc Tuymans and Michael Borremans. They’ll go for Thai artists, French ones.” Moreover, it’s an unusually convivial scene. One morning I met Sébastien Janssen at his brother’s gallery, and we spent the day together, chatting over lunch, driving around to a few other galleries, then to his own, and then to Gladstone’s. It was only when we were midway through the afternoon that I noticed how relaxed and amiable things were.

Even the collectors, it turned out, have their own collective, a large, airy space called Maison Particulière. It was established by the couple Myriam and Amaury de Solages, wealthy Parisians who moved to Brussels five years ago, and wanted to create a more social context in which to show their art. Three times a year, they establish a theme — when I visited, it was “Sex, Money and Power” — and invite a pool of five or six fellow collectors to contribute whatever art they think might fit. “There’s no pressure,” Myriam told me. “You’re among friends, people who share the same passion. You’re not interested in their business, what is interesting is what you love.” And her husband said, “We don’t think of ourselves as collectors. We’re more like amateurs, lovers of art.”

A few days later I stopped in at Wiels, the city’s first contemporary art center, which opened in 2007 in a converted brewery on the western, industrial side of town. It is, by most accounts, the most important thing to happen in town in some time, and its program — artists residencies, community outreach, talks, screenings and the like — is ambitious and altruistic: it is currently presenting a survey of work by Thomas Bayrle, an overlooked German Pop artist. It’s the kind of scrappy, multiform institution that every city needs; the surprise is that it took so long for Brussels to get one.

These are striking signs of life, but they’re forming around a glaringly empty space. Everyone in the Brussels art world mentions it almost immediately, with slightly embarrassed resignation: the city, alone among similarly cultured European capitals, has no museum of contemporary or even 20th-century art. In fact, and somewhat scandalously, Brussels’s Museum of Modern Art closed its doors in early 2011, in order to make way for a new museum focused on the turn of the century; it hasn’t been heard from since.

Brussels is home to fantastic collections in private hands, many drawn from Belgium’s traditions of intellectual, contrary and difficult art: James Ensor and Magritte, along with lesser-known movements like Les XX and Cobra, and prominent conceptualists like Marcel Broodthaers. But there’s no permanent collection in town to take them, no way for the city to inherit its own riches.

A few years ago, when the great local collector Herman Daled decided it was time to show the main body of the works he and his wife

had accumulated during the 1960s and 1970s, the exhibition was mounted in Munich and eventually acquired by the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and a significant portion of Brussels’s artistic patrimony was shipped overseas.

Maybe this is tragic, and maybe it isn’t. An artistic heritage is a fine thing, but art itself chafes at borders. There’s a certain deliberate neglect at work in Brussels, a disinclination to promote, brand, gentrify, boast. “It’s not a patriotic country,” Jan Mot said. “A national museum would be an outdated sign of something nostalgic, in the eyes of many.” That attitude is both the city’s strong suit and its weak point; it makes the place worldly but keeps it from being world-class.

“Brussels is a little bit awkward,” Katerina Gregos said, a little bit awkwardly. “Sometimes the lack of ambition pisses me off, but it’s also keeping the place sane.”
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby rublev » Sat Sep 20, 2014 8:09 am

Brussels has a really good art scene. When i was there last i spent most of my time just visiting as many galleries as possible.

A few more articles if anyone is interested are here and here

A few things i've been into lately;

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Jessica Stockholder. These are like my dream sculptures... wish i could see them irl

also really into Rachel Whiteread...

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love the resin colour tinted doors

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and this piece... all this colour is in pretty stark contrast to what she's known for (negative space casting in concrete and plaster etc)

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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby smiles » Sun Sep 21, 2014 5:47 am

Walid Raad

File Title: SECRETS IN THE OPEN SEA

Secrets in the Open Sea consists of 6 large photographic prints that were found buried 32 meters under the rubble during the 1992 demolition of Beirut's war-ravaged commercial districts. The prints were different shades of blue and each measured 110x183cm. The Lebanese government entrusted the prints to The Atlas Group in early 1994 for preservation and analysis.

In late 1994, The Atlas Group sent the prints to laboratories in France and the United States for technical analysis. Remarkably, the laboratories recovered small black and white latent images from the prints, and the small images represent group portraits of men and women. The Atlas Group was able to identify all of the individuals represented in the small black and white prints, and it turned out they were all individuals who had been found dead in the Mediterranean between 1975 and 1990.

The Atlas Group publicized its findings in December 1996. In the report, no determination was made about the size of the large prints nor about their color.


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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby exprof » Mon Sep 22, 2014 11:48 pm

Obsessed with Francis Bacon rugs

@_@

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warning extra large pictures after spoiler

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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby smiles » Tue Sep 23, 2014 11:23 am

Scratching on Things I Could Disavow
A History of Art in the Arab World

WALID RAAD

Section 139: The Atlas Group (1989-2004)

Between 1989 and 2004, I worked on a project titled The Atlas Group. It consisted of artworks made possible by the Lebanese wars of the past few decades.

In 2005, I was asked to exhibit this project for the first time in Lebanon, in Beirut’s first-of-its-kind white cube art gallery. For some reason, this offer perturbed me and I refused.

In 2006, I was asked again. I refused again.

In 2007, I was asked again. I refused again.

In 2008, I was asked again. I agreed.

Weeks later, when I went to the gallery to inspect my exhibition before its opening, I was startled to find that all my artworks had shrunk to 1/100th of their original size.

I subsequently decided to build a smaller white cube befitting my works’ new dimensions, and to display them there.


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2012
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby rublev » Fri Sep 26, 2014 5:10 pm

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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby blanket » Sat Sep 27, 2014 11:24 am

El Lissitzky makes a children's book - russian avant garde for kids. The Tate publishes an english translation.

About Two Squares / El Lissitzky
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I love this page
Do not read / take / paper --- fold / columns --- colour / blocks --- build
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rest in spoiler
Spoiler:
To all / to all / children
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El Lissitzky/ A Suprematist Story / about 2 Squares / in 6 constructions
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Here are / two squares
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They fly towards Earth / from far away
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And they see / a black chaos
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Crash / all is scattered
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On the black / established / the red / clearly
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Here / it ends / and then...
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UNOVIS / constructed 1920, Vitebsk
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Source
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby smiles » Wed Oct 01, 2014 4:54 am

Is art history global? edited by James Elkins is blowing my mind right now.
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby smiles » Wed Oct 01, 2014 9:30 am

@stappard_ well there's not really a main thesis. It's more of an investigation about how/if art history can be made into a global discipline and what it would look like. Right now, art history is essentially a western idea that requires scholars in non-western places to conform to specific methodological approaches if they want to be considered art historians. Obviously not as true as it once was the the fundamentals are still there. The discipline has gotten more expansive but also more intensive on a specific canon. To make Art history global (assuming it can be) some people want to take a theoretical/phenomenological approach to talking about 'art' as it can apply to any context with ideas like 'space' or 'idol' or 'ritual' or 'planar' and some want to take an essentially postcolonial context driven approach w/r/t methodologies and how 'art' is understood. Others think art history may be absorbed by visual studies.

some stats i found interesting

most frequently cited artists in bibliography of history of art (1957-2007)
1. Picasso - 757
2. Durer - 616
3. Rubens 600
4. Michelangelo 537
5. Leonardo 526
6. Raphael - 460
7. Rembrandt - 442
8. Titian - 418
9. Goya - 391
10. Palladio 377

Or the other way:
Artists who were cited once : c. 10,000
cited twice c. 5,000
cited three times c 1,400
cited four times 1,105
cited five times 715

One of the main things I've come to understand is the essential factor of access to sources and information. Where I'm working now arguably has the largest collection of books/ephemera on Asian art in the world and the books we have now simply aren't accessible in other places. Some people come all the way from America just for a document we have. Also sources not in English can really impede research. The spread of google books and other online resources will certainly change how people write about art.

Personally, In terms of me being smart about my learning, I should get on global modernisms and learn arabic in addition to french and chinese, which is what I'm planning on doing. The field is heading that way.
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby smiles » Wed Oct 01, 2014 9:51 am

Walid Raad


VIEWS FROM INNER TO OUTER COMPARTMENTS

At the opening of a new museum of modern and/or contemporary art in an Arab city, a proud local resident rushes the entrance only to find that he is unable to proceed.

Was it his casual wear at an event announced as a black-tie affair? No.

Was it the thugs that shielded the ruling dynasty attending the event en masse to showcase their benevolence and refined sensibilities, pubescent-future-rulers in tow that prevent his access? No.

He simply feels that were he to walk in he will certainly ‘hit a wall.’

On the spot, he turns to face the rushing crowd and screams: ‘Stop. Don’t go in. Be careful.’

Within seconds, he is removed from the site, severely beaten and sent to a psychiatric facility.

These events will take place sometime between 2014 and 2024. We will certainly read in newspapers the following day the headline: Demented Man Disturbs Opening - Claims World Is Flat.


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With regard to the surpassing disaster, art acts like the mirror in vampire films: it reveals the withdrawal of what we think is still there. ‘You have seen nothing in Hiroshima’ [Hiroshima mon amour]. Does this entail that one should not record? No. One should record this ‘nothing,’ which only after the resurrection can be available.
- jalal toufic
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby BIGBEE » Thu Oct 02, 2014 1:25 am

I should stop arguing with people on facebook about abstract expressionism. I don't know that much about art, but I do hate when people mock Mark Rothko for "just painting rectangles" or people complaining about Rothko paintings auctioning for 80 million plus. I think people don't understand that a painting doesn't gain value based on how great or complex it is. Paintings gain value based on their significance and importance to the era of painting they were in. This is just my (probably naive) opinion though

But back on topic, I want to see a Rothko painting in person so much. I think me and my bro, who's really into art and knows way more than I do, are gonna go to the Rothko Chapel eventually.

http://i.imgur.com/OZjkV61.jpg (didn't use bbc code because I wanted you guys to see the highest res pic possible)
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby ramseames » Thu Oct 02, 2014 1:45 am

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Francisco Goya
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby smiles » Thu Oct 02, 2014 1:53 am

rothko is worth $80 million mostly because of speculation but also because of his intrinsic value. aside from a lucky few most artists will be 'hot' for about 18 months while the prices get speculated up so some people can flip them. If an artist is good they'll probably get collected and their value will stabilize. not so good artists will start to lose value again.

that's basically what i understand. I'm not that informed about the market though.
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby rublev » Fri Oct 03, 2014 5:09 pm

.
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby pirxthepilot » Tue Oct 07, 2014 6:31 pm

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my friend, at work in her studio
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby sknss » Wed Oct 08, 2014 6:21 am

What is your friend doing
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby schiaparelli » Wed Oct 15, 2014 4:57 pm

rothko.me. wait and watch for a while, it's very enjoyable.

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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby rublev » Fri Oct 17, 2014 4:55 pm

.
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby station » Mon Nov 03, 2014 1:39 am

I've had a soft spot for ceramics ever since I took a class in high school of it.

Ito Sekisui V
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Sakai Hiroshi
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Kato Tsubusa
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby rublev » Mon Nov 03, 2014 12:53 pm

boy i love ceramics! this is one of my fave books. i got it last christmas and still look at it a lot... big heavy hardback with good paper, lovely photos and information on each pot... i would love to go to some classes

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what could be better than a reference book of pots

maybe someone to share it with :(
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Re: (capital) A – R – T

Postby sknss » Mon Nov 03, 2014 2:04 pm

raf simons sold his personal porcelain collection last december viewtopic.php?f=2&t=61&p=10430&hilit=piasa#p10430
and i went to the auction. sadly raf wasn't there but i got this book
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roger capron, pol chambost, george jouve, jacques blin...
Spoiler:
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